ARE FRENCH PEOPLE RUDE?! Exploring the stereotype in depth

ARE FRENCH PEOPLE RUDE?! Exploring the stereotype in depth

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    Not Even French

    VIDEO GUIDE:
    1. Where is this stereotype coming from? "00:57"
    2. The four major cultural misunderstandings "02:42"
    – French people are coconuts "02:56"
    – French service is slower "05:26"
    – The customer is not the king "07:02"
    – Parisians and the tourist hangover "08:32"
    3. Tips and tricks for avoiding any "rudeness" "11:13"
    4. Conclusion/final thoughts "14:05"

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    Léa Forslund

    I am glad you mentioned cultural differences. I've been living in France for twelve years and have yet to experience rudeness. My observations from life and travel is that people respond to how we treat them.

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    Théo Bruncher

    The golden rule to absolutely know is saying BONJOUR. You can't start talking to anybody if you don't say it. Period !

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    UNION WORLD

    Is not rude, not talking to you is a sign of polite in France… For example, in China if you look at a person to their eyes, it’s a sign of provocation… While in France, look a person to their eyes it’s a sign that you listen to him and you are attentif to what he said…

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    anastasia46

    american restaurants take it to another extreme. I was asked for my drink order before I even sat down. I have been handed a menu before I even took my coat off. My plate is whisked away before I finish chewing. The bill is presented without me asking for it and the restaurant is half empty.

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    Bateau Ivre

    Je suis assez épaté par ta connaissance des Français. Tu as une grande ouverture d'esprit, et on sent que tu as fait l'effort de t'intégrer. Félicitations, vraiment !

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    82465amen

    I just got done chatting with a French woman who did nothing but trash talk my country. This was the first thing she brought up.

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    Arthur Rimbaud

    As a French born and bred in Paris and coming from a very Parisian family: THE FRENCH ARE RUDE. In Paris especially. And it's not because they are tired or too busy. No, they are rude, and the more I travel abroad, the more I realise that. And be sure that they are also rude to the French people, it's not a question of being a tourist or not. If I may say so – and I dont want to say your video is inadequate because you made a few very subtle observations – the problem with the French is much deeper than you want to believe. To summarize the problem: the French are not nice. They are snobbish, formal, sexist, they complain a lot, they are grumpy, miserable, and rude by principle. Of course, I am not talking about private relationships with friends and family, I am talking about the interactions in society in general, with people you dont know and whom you have just met, or at work etc. Also you may not realise the extent to which French society is conflictual (between classes, the rich and the poor..), which is also a cultural trait coming from the French Revolution, a trauma which I think still marks the generations of today. However, you are right to say the French ppl have to be "seduced" and then they can become super nice, but only if she / he, likes you. Traveling through the US, Canada, Japan, Western Europe (the UK typically), Africa, I have never met such rude people as the French. Well… apart from that, the French are intelligent and have plenty of qualities…And of course you will also meet lots of very nice people, but mainly, the level of rudeness is high. We really need to learn what customer service means. I hope I was not too rude with my comment on your video 🙂 Take care and enjoy the French people – by making friends with them in the private circle ! Apart from that, rudeness from waitresses or employees of the public service, etc, should not be tolerated.

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    bartcolen

    Being from the midwestern United States and anyway being decidedly old-fashioned about certain things, good manners are very important to me. Though I had spent several weeks in Brittany in the mid-1990s and had had nothing but good experiences, it had been over twenty years since I had last been in France when I went back in 2017 for the summer. I must say that when it came to French rudeness, I was in for a real shock!

    Now, this may come down to my own expectations when dealing with people (I always assume politeness and decency to be the norm), apart from a very busy man at one of the main train stations in Paris who was understandably a TINY bit short with a confused non-native speaker like me, I must say that I found the French to be EXCEPTIONALLY polite, welcoming, helpful, encouraging, hospitable and agreeable (yes, even in Paris!). The closest anyone ever really came to rudeness was the one person in twenty who could tell that I was a foreigner and would respond to my French in English. And even that was never done with an air of impatience or rudeness, just expediency. And indeed, though I was learning on the fly, a number of people went out of their way to help me with my French and would even compliment me on my efforts (one woman in a bakery complimenting me on my "syntax", which delighted me no end!).

    In short, if you are cool, polite and have a go at their language (however haltingly), you would have to have either really bad luck or really bad karma to be treated rudely in France.

    Absolutely lovely people, the French.

    (Go to German-speaking Switzerland if you are looking for baseless rudeness! They're the TRUE Jedi knights of bad manners!)

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    Carl Spartacus

    Your beauty and kind manners entertain me. Thank you. I hope to live in Paris one day, I keep learning from you. <3

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    Steve Steele

    I had a waiter change my plate order cause I ate the wrong plate first. Fork in hand heading toward the plate, then swap.

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    Carole Moreo

    I’m an American coconut, no wonder why I feel at home in France. Politeness and formality go a long way in my book.

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    Oh Canada

    I'm of French descent and have lived abroad. I must say that in large cities anywhere, folks are in a hurry. Those are business districts and rushing about is the order of the day. The suburban or country area outside areas outside the cities is more relaxed and more chattier, everywhere! Seriously. However, good to know the different languages in the country one visits.

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    Sohay

    I searched "french people" to understand my french homemates in Japan. But idk… after watching video I get that French are all good if I respect their individuality, but they don't seem to respect me and my opinion. I know "freedom" is very important thing but what I saw is judging people(I do not understand French, but I could get it by some english worlds and the context), ignore the person in front of them, and breaking so many rules. It is really hard to tell them 'be quiet at midnight', 'tidy up things after use'. I'm pretty sure I was very careful to tell this messages, but they get all offensive about it and start attacking me with something I didn't do, and the sudden attack happens at midnight, knocking on my door ….my god..Is there a concept of personal spaces??
    I did visit Paris for travel, had horrible human experience there, and incredibly rude homemates. I was unlucky to have only bad experiences but man.. Now it is traumatizing. 🙁

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    HUGO VICTOR

    Trop de clients n'ont-ils pas tendance à confondre "serveur" et "serviteur" ?
    C'est de mauvais goût d'imposer sa présence et, parfois, ses caprices "de star", sous prétexte que l'on vient dépenser de l'argent.

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    Arianna M.

    I think I would like France. I hate making chit-chat with strangers unless I actually like have something meaningful to say or bring up. I prefer people who are genuine versus people who are just warm and friendly on the outside but really don't care either way. I agree that the customer is not king and that the customer isn't always right. Some customers can be entitled a**holes.

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    Bruce Marsico

    GET OUT OF PARIS!Do you think all USA people are polite?  Do you?Do you think all Brits are polite?  Do you?Not all Italians are glad to see tourists.  Some Italiansin Rome are total bastards.  Same with Viennese.  Some people in Brasil are total shits.  They're not all welcoming.Be polite, not syrupy but genuine.  I've never had a problem in France.  I found Strasbourg one of the mostwonderful of places.  I never had a problem in the Netherlands….though I'm sure they've gotasses there too.

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    monos lulius

    After 15 minutes yes I learned how rude and they are, really I just couldn't imagine how small they feel about themselves to force people to pay that much attention and reverence

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    Jay P

    I traveled all over france including paris. The rudest people I met were American Tourists. French people are actually very nice people. But they don't put up with crap. If you act arrogant and demanding toward them, they're not gonna hesitate to snap back. I think Americans especially are too used to being catered to and they're often shocked when they go to other countries where people don't put up with it.

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    Kalel Vigil

    I really do relate to that coconut parable. A lot of what you said could be paralleled in the American Midwest to me a, cause a lot of the people out here can seem really standoffish and incredibly rude. But once you become friends with them, they would drive out to the middle of nowhere for you just to help you with a flat tire. People like that are often very tough to get behind for a lot of extroverts like myself, but growing up in the Midwest I had a little bit more of an advantage.

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    Victoria Omar

    I know not all French are rude and I'm not a tourist but when I went to Disney (in Paris) I was watching the fire works two girls pushed in saying something I did not understand so my lil bro could not see they were speaking French to me and I could not say anything but they never gave up on me, they kept trying to talk to me now I think of it I should of said "English" in a French accent but I did not and they were obi practising English for me! Bless them! I could tell because they were saying English words that did not make sense together and they were saying it very poorly,but they were making and effort. But the second time I saw them their were two patches of grass they were raised and had railing around them with flowers inside and it was just one of them things that you knew you weren't allowed to go in whilst I was seeing the fire works French people climed over the railing and so we could not see so that ruined our night..

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    Nancy JonesFrancis

    Not sure if this is the video but on one of them you talked about how French people can be impatient and will cut in front of you in line and huff and sigh as well. My very first hour in France, specifically while waiting in line to go through customs, the guy behind did all of that. He wasn’t successful in cutting in front of me because I was on to him and subtlety wouldn’t let him. He eventually gave up but continued to huff and sigh. In his defense (not really) we had already been in line about half an hour and still had what turned out to be more than an hour in line total. This is by far the longest line I’ve had to wait in to get through customs. Even Tokyo was way faster. I do understand this guy’s frustration. I’m not patient either, but we all were suffering. This encounter made me smile because of your video. ☺️

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    أعلنت عليك لعنة الكارما عليك لعنة الكارما

    I am an Arab. I’ve been to France 🇫🇷 and I’ve never been experienced redness. I think 🤔 it depends on u , as well, Cheri!😜

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    Swordfishzz Swordfishzz

    I'm a Kiwi too. We've been on a few big 2-3 week self-drive road trips through France over the last 25 years. Ordinary French people are among the warmest & nicest people you could meet in our experience. I'm talking about shopkeepers, cafe wrkrs, motorway services people & so on. Always smiling, friendly & upbeat. More so than in most other Euro countries. We were very impressed.

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    Jacky Guerrero

    Thanks for this video. I've been in France for 10 days now and while most interactions I've had have been fine there have been a bad few that have left a sour taste in my mouth. This a good reminder to not let it get to me!

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    La tartine au chocolat

    Non les parisiens sont impolis les parisiens sont des trous du cul répétez après moi les parisiens sont des trous du cul. 😀

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    SplatM4n Science

    AHH Merci Boucoup! Les parents en France sont trés stricts parce qu'ils veulent que les enfants soient polis. Un exemple est la façon dont nous gardons toujours le dos droit, demandes de sortire la table, positionez nous argenterie de manière à signaler si nous avon fini ou si nous voulon plus, attendez de commencer à manger quand tout le monde est à la table, et caetera. Hmmm, Maintenant nous sommes meilleurs que les Américains. Les américains ne font aucune de ces truc (mais pas tout les Américains parce que ils y a les Américains qui sont vraiment polis). Et Beaucoup d'Américains sont obéses et et ça n'a pas l'air joli.

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    Haunie Rymbuii

    Here's my experience, Im Indian but from North Eastern region, we are culturally different, we look different (Asian), and our accent is also different. Last month me and my parents visited Paris. We arrived by train from Interlaken, Switzerland. The taxi driver who was supposed to pick us up was late by 45mins. The worst thing.. He didnt even dropped us at the hotel! He dropped us across the street of the hotel!!! He is definitely not French, he is dark, somewhat Bangladeshi/Pakistan. Spoke little english and blamed the traffic cause he had to take a long U-turn. But seriously left us with our heavy luggage opposite to the hotel. That's just the first part.
    On day 3, we were to go and visit The Versailles Palace. The tourist van leaves at 8:20am. We were supposed to reached at 8am to where the Van awaits. As for the past 2 days, I was familiar with the metro routes, we took the metro early morning, but due to my bad calculation of stops, we got down 15mins walk away from where the Van was waiting. It was near Tour Eiffel. This is what the tourist guide said to us, " Ahh Indians huh? Always late! Its in your culture"!!! I was like WTH, we reached at 8:15am the Van was supposed to leave at 8:20am, yes we didnt reached before 8am, it was our fault but still we managed to make it before @! I was so off mood with the racial criticism from the guide I slept off on the way to the palace. When we arrived at the palace, the guide told us, " Please dont take any food items inside the palace, like most Indians do and mess up the whole place"!! Seriously?? Why all this abuse? What have we done to her that makes her speak such stuffs??? And yes when explaining stuffs at the palace, she didnt even bother to look at us, she looked only at the americans when explaining all the historic details in the palace. Later on when she saw that we aren't like the Indians she had met, she started treating us with a smile. But in my head im still like "Screw you, you racist B"!!!
    I met a friend there in Paris, she was so polite and humble, but are others treating other people so badly just because they dont know them??? What's the point of Bonjouring when you still have racism and hatred in your heart???

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    cynthia davis

    When we went to Paris several years ago, we had absolutely NO problems. Why? Because I didn’t expect any, and because we were blown away by the beauty of the country—and made no secret of our appreciation for the French. We said hello, please and thank you. I’ll say it again, thank you for being such a warm, welcoming country.

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    Nuttymeemps

    I’ve been all over Europe and all I can say is that the Parisians are the rudest people I have ever met. They go out of their way to be awful. And if you speak English, their fangs come out. That’s not a stereotype, it’s just my personal experience.

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    Enusama

    I was in Strassbourg once. And they were really polite. As I always like to say: Strassbourg is just a german city speaking French.

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    Blair Calvin

    I don’t generally find them rude even though Paris for example is overrun by tourists like myself.
    And one of the MANY things I admire about the French is their ability to throw a bloody good riot!
    Aussies are so damn apolitical and lazy.

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    Kaisa Watson

    In the US, the more friendly and open to a newcomer, the more polite. In France the more formal, and distant, the more polite. I think you summed it all up 🙂

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    V ML

    C’est quoi le problème des gens qui vivent en dehors de Paris avec Paris 😂 vous y avez mis les pieds au moins ?

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    Philippe CERDAN

    Merci beaucoup pour cette analyse ! merci pour l'intelligence du cœur ! Merci de chercher à comprendre ce qui est différent chez l'autre ….. c'est une démarche rare qui me touche beaucoup et qui révèle un grand cœur ! Bonne continuation !

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    HELMUT ALTO

    I always appreciate this "Rude French' crap coming from Anglo US douches. Above all considering the non stop flood of bullshits vomited by these turds against the French on the web. lt's a misperception based on cultural differences. Anglo US douches think that they own the world and that their model is the only one on this planet.. Above all when you know that USians are the most ignorant fucks in the world. 80 % have no passports and never travel outside US. They think that the whole world is based on US model, while they don't even realize that it's the total opposite, in fact. US are not even 5 % of world population. A little bit more than 300 million, while world population is around 8 billion. There are probably more rude, insane and mean people in US than in France. I've experienced it myself. All these piles of bullshits are nothing more than hidden jealousy coming from frustrated cunts, who should try to fix their problem with France in mental clinics. And if they don't like France no one force them to come here. They are free to go where they want, and fuck themselves elsewhere. In North Korea or Iran, for instance.

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    Jay Kilborn

    I am an American, who lives in France, and that is one of the big différences I have noticed between the French and Americans.  One time my wife, who is French, and I were at Universal Studio City in Los Angeles someone overheard us talking and they mentioned that they had visited Paris.  While I have lived in France, for 15 years, only 2 times has a stranger talked to me.  Once, we were in the metro and a stranger was looking at me, so I said bonjour, her response was "do I know you?"  Now, I don't talk to strangers unless they talk to me first.

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    Isa Huot

    Les français sont rudes avec les français qui trouvent les français rudent et les français en ont marre de ces français

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    Isa Huot

    Le service ds la restauration surtout et dans Paris particulièrement c'est scandaleux… On est là pour leur rapporter du fric et ils nous le font bien sentir je précise je suis française

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    Nicolas Coquin

    Hey, good video!
    I shall just add two more things :
    If you get to live in the south part of France, people will be warmer, you just need to know one friend, and everybody who you'll be introduced to will be chill and friendly with you (from my experience in Marseille compared to Lyon, Grenoble and Paris)
    Also, when you're a french expat in a foreign country, it's quite boring to see that french people are even cold between them, they don't want to make friends or have a conversation just because you're french too

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    Beké Downes

    I know this is a bit of an older vid but wanted to say that as an Australian the things you explain about etiquette etc, is just everyday living for me. I may say a little hello to someone in a small space but I don't need to go in my life story and actually get really uncomfortable with small talk. Saying hello and thank you etc and treating people in the service industry with respect should happen everywhere. I don't see a waiter or a barrister (even in my smaller beach town) as me being right and they should do everything I want etc, but as an equal, and often more that I am very grateful they are making my coffee or making my food etc (even though i am paying for it) etc. It's just manners and being a good person i think. I have not been to France (i would love to one day) but I think your advice should be common sense all over the world 🙂

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    illuminatutos

    From my french point of view, someone who doesn't speak french but tries with a few words to get some for exemple is showing that he is interested in the country, and respectful to the culture. I'm always willing to help someone if they try to speak french, in my eyes they are showing me respect. Even if he can't speak french, he tries, and that's the most important part. "C'est l'intention qui compte", as we say. As you stated very well, in France you are not talking to a waiter as an employee trying to earn some money, but to a person who's trying to offer you a nice moment, in the most human way possible. I think that is why it's super easy to talk to people in Italy. The culture is almost the same, plus (especially in northern Italy) people speak french and love french people. The opposite is also true( I live in Savoy).

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    Bionity

    I am not sure if it's true, but I tend to think like you : french are not good in faking warm attitude. They are as warm as a human can be in this world, but the fake first warm impression isn't a thing here. So less smiles, more real smiles.
    It's hard for tourist, but when you live here, it's high rewarded. If a french finally smiles at you, you feel it warmer.

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    Mateusz Szczerba

    Thank you for sharing this!
    I moved from Europe to the US and gained like 25 kg in a few years. The culture here is: the more you eat, the better. Food is extremely salty and sweet in restaurants to a degree that I couldn't eat out for the first month because everything was so salty! Plus, I still get shocked when in a supermarket I see some products that are sold as food, but all they contain is sugar, artificial colors, and chemicals. It's really sad.
    Also, sometimes my friends get shocked when I suggest walking somewhere. "It's too far to walk", whereas I'm like "Seriously?" Lol. It's a sad world here when it comes to food.
    I've been losing weight now, mostly by returning to eating European-size food portions and avoiding the American-style processed foods. Efforts that I never had to take in Europe.

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    HELMUT ALTO

    I think that a lot of Anglo US cunts should try to fix their problem with France in mental clinics. Boring, after a while.

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    Ana K

    Do love France and I respect as the way French people are ,to me it’s just different experience nothing wrong with that 🌺🌺🌺

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    Panji Agustian

    you know coconut is a racist slur in the US, for those latinos or mexican americans who doesnt speak spanish.

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    ericmarseille2

    Your bit on France being a very hierarchical society still, which explains why low-ranked professionals like waiters or else can remind you from time to time that they're human beings with a dignity, is the best description of the "French bad service" complex I've ever heard…Goes straight to my heart, you're so smart.

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    SMD 014

    Stereotypes exist for a reason…there is truth to them. This video was interesting but has only solidified how rude Parisians are….they don't want to chat with strangers b/c they're self-absorbed; their whole way of life is about fulfilling inner desires and living for self, living in the moment… yada yada…It is a very SELFISH way to think and live. I bet I am driving some french person crazy right now with this…. Let's be honest here, French people don't like speaking to strangers because they don't give a damn about them, nor their interests, their opinions, thoughts, etc..; they're closed off and cold bc their self-absorbed…I find it odd how they expect you to say hello and look down on you if you don't say Bonjour; yet, they shutter at the thought of having a small conversation with a stranger. How sad that French people don't like little chats with strangers…. Who knows what that small conversation could lead to… Maybe something interesting or good perhaps? And for French people to complain about having to give an American, directions after they have worked an 8 hour day and have an hour commute…Really?… That is pretty much every American already…we're all overworked; have long commutes, and just want to go home, and most of us can still give a foreigner directions without an attitude. Try being a bit more SELFLESS FRENCH people!…And wow…so many rules…"If a conversation ensues with a french person, don't be too loud or giggly; don't use hyperbole too much…these are marks of simpletons." Excuse me while I roll my eyes. So, okay, I will just pretend to be a droid if I happen to bump into a Parisian….Oh French people—GET OVER YOURSELVES, btw, please stand up already and save your country; it looks like Islamabad. Aside from my rant, I appreciated the video.

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    Erick Johnson

    Too funny. I am living in Brissy, Au. I find Kiwis a nicer, British version of Australia. This is a long to how Canadians are a nicer version of American.

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    Trav L

    I don’t know French in France but all the French people I’ve met in Australia are so fucking rude. Saw a French dude in convention store and he’s told his card transaction has declined, then he kept asking the stuff why, the stuff told him to call the bank, and that French dude was like “you’re full of bullshit”, and there was a long queue behind him.

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    Dany Varius

    De la part d'un peuple qui dit Fuck You or Fuck Off à longueur de temps, i took a LOUD American' lesson 🙂 Well, well Frenchies are the CORE of the PEACH but empty after the core 🙂 hahahaha

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    GodGunsGutsandNRA

    I’m an American, but I was born a “coconut.” After doing an Ancestry DNA test I know why…..high % French/Italy DNA. Sooooo…. shut up, I am trying to enjoy my cheese & drink my wine.

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    Julien

    Les Parigots et les citadins (pas ceux qui y sont pas nés, et pas tous non plus) sont arrogants, orgueilleux, imbu de leur personne, matérialistes et des sombres connards qui génèrent les stéréotypes. Combien de ces citadins font leurs loi en campagne pour arrêter le chant du coq ou le gong des cloches de l'église ?? Aller donc vous faire… Et après les attentats dans le 11ème, les serveurs étaient très gentils pour y avoir été, comme quoi c'est de la mauvaise foi…

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    Venus77x

    I had to laugh when you mentioned being too loud and over excited was a mark of a 'simpleton' in France 😂….well I happen to agree with that, I'm in the UK and encounter this on a daily basis, especially in certain supermarkets….some rough mother screaming at 'little Jimmy', down the bread aisle. You get to know far too much in a few seconds, I actually try to avoid a certain supermarket for that reason, it draws the oddballs like a magnet 😬….I think I really would fit in well in France, peace and tranquility 💕

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    Yasmina Derid

    Nice video ! I am French, by the way. Being polite (in French) is always a good start, because it shows respect. (I did not came to your Country thinking that you are OBLIGATED to speak my language) + even if you only know the basics :"Bonjour, s'il vous plaît (please), merci (thank you), aurevoir (bye). If you start with Bonjour, most French people, (even those who do not speak English), will try to help you (with gestures if need be) I saw it multiple times, it is funny and nice.❤️🧡💛💚💙💜
    Peace, Love, and Coconut

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    Flow the Wolf

    all person are diferant in france in usa too…I JUST HAVE dis to say bc im not like thas french shy french are sweet or bad not polite is important you have psycho in usa in france you kno what i want say (sowwy for my english im french and rlly young sowwy)

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    Jjibarra23 Ibarra

    I visited France recently. I did not feel welcomed at all lol. My mom was shopping at this ladies store and I was waiting in front of it. She came out and told me not to stand in front of her store. Felt like people were staring at me a lot lol. I can understand them being sick of tourists though. If that was my home overrun by tourist every single day I would be sick of it too.

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    Trung Do

    I have been living in France for decades and agree with your analysis especially on the introduction phrase : " bonjour parlez-vous anglais ". As english is an international communication language , many foreigners take it for granted and don't ask people if they can speak it. That could annoy the french.

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