Authentication and Citizenship | Reality Check

Authentication and Citizenship | Reality Check


The internet is like a giant library that
catalogues millions of new publications every second. But how do you know if what you’re reading
is fiction or non-fiction? During an election campaign, information and
content online about the election can range from reliable, to biased, to entirely misleading. Make sure that you ask the right questions
about what you see online, and are well-informed before you vote or share information with
friends. Here are three key tips to getting good information
about important issues: First, find more than one source on the topic.
Everyone has an opinion and a point of view. Responsible news media try to keep coverage
objective, but all sources can be biased in what they include – or what they leave out. Bias doesn’t necessarily make something
unreliable, but you need to do some digging to get the whole story. If you look at several reliable sources, the
bias should even out. Information online should always be scrutinized
for bias and reliability. Don’t just read news stories that your friends
are recommending on social media. Strive for a balanced news diet: look at sources
with different perspectives. Make a habit of using news aggregators that
feature summaries and stories from across the spectrum. Challenge your thinking by following diverse
sources on social media. Finally, for more information about the positions
of political candidates and political parties, it’s always best to go to their official
websites and social media accounts. And of course you can always take it offline,
and talk to the candidate directly. Elections are important. Make sure you’re
getting – and sharing – good information.

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