Citizen Science + Zero-Point Challenge Answer | Space Time

Citizen Science + Zero-Point Challenge Answer | Space Time


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    Tristan Frodelius

    What would a universe without relativity look like? If there were a "universal clock"? How would diagrams and scenarios you've shown us so far be different?

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    b1aflatoxin

    The Flat Earthers hate citizen science. -Much like their antiscience counterparts in the Taliban and Boko Haram. 😛 BOOSH!

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    Andrew Miroshnikov

    HEY THUMBS UP PLEASE. I recently read about a new explanation of dark matter called SIMPs. PBS, may you please lead my curiosity? Love your videos <4

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    Tomas Mood

    20 geckos? Really plausibel that they could do that. This is absurd. Math is not an accurate description of the world and what we see in it, it is just what you see when your fov is set to 1 and tries to play games on your computer. Accurate but not very true.

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    Dave Berendhuysen

    @PBS Space Time: I wasn't sure how to reach you so I'll just put this here. I was wondering if my logic was sound..

    The moment of expansion of the Big Bang. When the entire mass encapsulated it's own cosmic horizon. Everything was extremely hot at first. All the mass was fighting against each other, in a soup of creation, claiming their territory. Until some mass its territory got stretched too far. That's when gaps started showing. Anti-matter. Vacuum. Never trusted vacuum to begin with. When vacuum took over, like stretching molasses too thin in zero gravity, chunks started forming. The bigger the chunks were the heavier, so they could fly all over the place, like grease in water.. These sub-atomic particles of mass claimed more territory and the small ones became stuck in the leftovers. Much like marbles of different sizes, ad infinitum, stacked on top of each other. Now we're in a state in which there's so much vacuum, there's an entire universe of it. With a few exceptions. Notably, us and our small friends.

    We live in an ever increasing existence, welcome: Time.

    Of course everyone is welcome to pitch in.

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    Elsie Hannam

    I have been going on Galaxy Zoo, and Gravity Spy for a long time; so addictive, and educational. Galaxy Zoo even has an app you can use on your phone. Just an excellent time-filler!! These are my favourites, but I also liked the Mars terrain spotter (Planet Four) (that's TERRain, not train ha ha)

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    porgy29

    I should have asked this on the first zero point energy video but I didn't. I remembered learning that Geckos use Van der Waals forces to stick to things. Is that wrong or are Van der Waals forces the same thing as the Kassmir Effect?

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    Archisman Chakrabarty

    I had a question, dare to answer it, my friend : I often wonder from where did the universe come from? And from where it came, where did that come from? And the questions would never end. So my question is, what could be the reason for the birth of anything in the universe?

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    common sense

    Brilliant brain of mine? That's what you think? No. I'm stupid to you high standing pedestal guys. But I have eyes to help you sort data for your brains, your all mighty brains, that only you have, so says your very fat egos. Waste of my brains don't you think and everyone else participating. News flash, we're not dumb. Some of us, actually, are smarter than you are.

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    bormisha

    Why do you say that geckos utilize the Casimir effect, whereas they could just as well utilize molecular attraction (van der Waals forces) which are purely electromagnetic?

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    Kevin Toppins

    Question: why are they called virtual particles if they are said to definitely exist ?

    Can you clarify the meaning of what a virtual particle actually is ?

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    Pasted

    Im gonna build a vacum chamber and do some experimentation. At home and everyone think im going mad . This is the story of every scientist

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    Jacob Held

    I've been running BOINC for a while now, offsetting the electrical cost with the Gridcoin I have earned in doing so.
    I am really excited to see this receive a bit more attention!

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    bizo237

    The government was offering grants to develop image recognition software to sweep the skies. It could be a great filter, praise Jupiter.
    Developing New commercial and research telescopes capable of beating Rayleigh scattering is now possible.https://m.phys.org/news/2016-10-physicists-dispel-rayleigh-curse.html
    Unless we already solved the gravitational many body problem, these opportunities may remain open.

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    Lone Wolf

    OK OK, i watch this show regularly, i know this question is not very scientific, but i had to ask, what's the soundtrack ?!

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    A A

    CERN has a similar citizen science initiative where you can look at collision data to spot photon pairs (if i remember correctly).

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    TheReaverOfDarkness

    It's not astronomy, but Eve Online is doing Project Discovery in which you get in-game prizes for doing real cellular microbiology.

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    Felipe Lorenzzon

    In my early trigonometry classes, I thought I would one day come up with a function to approximate sin and cos. Last year, I was introduced to Taylor series. Some one had already done that

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    Branden Reinert

    I am on zooverse and I do Galaxy Zoo and and I new one I just got emailed about looking for star clusters. I too have had aperture fever… It's an expensive but rewarding fever to have!

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    NeverTalkToCops1

    Geckos are using Casimir effect to stick to surfaces? Could be a good example of quantum effects in everyday, macroscale objects. The last bit on Zero point, that was not trivial. This number with 120 zeros (an error magnitude) comes up often, not enough physicists lose sleep over it, IMO. Thanks.

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    John

    why dont you make a challange where you ask a question like these, then ask a question that scientists havent got an answer for, but you dont say this?

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    Alejandro Bravo

    7:43 actually the energy density estimated by QED is 10^114, not 10^112.
    It's just 2 orders of magnitud bigger, but come on.

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    Craig Flowers

    Yeah I got your "citizen science" right here. I've got the world's first "first terms" theory of everything, which also happens to be the world's first theory of everything which reconciles quantum mechanics with reltivistic physics. Isn't <–that the "holy grail"? Funny, because NOBODY wants to even so much as listen, let alone consider, the theory despite its value SIMPLY for those two unique and highly-sought-after attributes. First Terms dammit. You know, like E=mc^2, but where it ALSO works for quantum mechanics. Yeah, I DID IT. And it dies with a whimper . . . oh well, lemmings.

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    Matt M

    Been doing SETI and BOINC for nearly 15 years now. If only I had time to gaze at the stars, but also using BOINC for cancer research

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    Celt Gunn

    I put in months & months into Galaxy Zoo. I absolutely loved finding the galaxies, the "bubbles" star clusters, nebulae too. It was a great program!

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    Tyee Cambrón

    I remember running some kind of mass science exe on my 486 computer long time ago. Not sure if it helped any with like a 1.6KBps upload rate.

    Now that I have some kind of 2.8GHZ and 4GB RAM laptop with fiber. Well, I probably am still useless %0.0001 hahaha…. Just now got the Citizen Science project going if I am idle for 3 minutes from my laptop. And ya, I am quite idle a lot, and probably would have a game running idle for the whole night.

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    zxyqu

    Had to have been one of the first [email protected] users waaaayyyyyy back in high school. Was a great idea and used it continuously through more than 10 years. Haven’t done it in awhile though once the power bill became mine.

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