Citizens Assembly 2 Glasgow Nov – Day 1

Citizens Assembly 2 Glasgow Nov – Day 1


lovely thank you very much thank you
very much yeah it’s fantastic to hear the buzz in the room I think it just
shows how connected you are to each other and to this process I hope you
enjoyed Friday evening and the evidence given to us from Phil and Kayla and that
it was helpful some building blocks in taking us forward today and tomorrow and
I believe some of you had a very good sleep can I just passed all my apologies
to others who made did who did not and they there was a Christmas party and
here yesterday our wedding and we’re both Christmas wedding party and so
apologies to anybody who was disturbed by that you will be very pleased to hear
that for the rest of the weekend on for the rest of our oh he can’t hear sorry
is that better okay so I was just apologizing to anybody who didn’t get a
good night’s sleep last night there was a party in this room that maybe was
slightly noisy in the hotel that will not happen this evening or the weekends
ahead of us because we we kind of my own this room so unless we decide to have a
party you shouldn’t be disturbed there’s an idea for the last weekend okay so in
a few minutes what I’m going to do is I’m going to hand over to Kelly who will
be the lead facilitator today to explain in detail how the day will run but I
just wanted to go through a little bit of housekeeping and some reflections on
weekend 1m and a few few words about this weekend before we do that so so
this is our room and this is going to be our home for the next weekend for the
rest this weekend and all of our weekends so please genuinely make
yourself feel at home those exits on either side of the room
there’s toilets back out in the atrium and just kind of come and go and get in
the flow and make yourselves as comfortable as you can be we have got a
photographer joining us this afternoon but again as I mentioned yesterday
unless you’ve given your consent to being photographed you won’t be in those
photographs so let’s cast our minds back five weekends ago M to our first weekend
Edinburgh and and reflect and remember the work that you did at at that time
you looked at your hopes and your fears about what is special about Scotland and
we built a kind of word cloud if you recall about the country that you are
seeking to build and we heard evidence on the Constitution and we heard quite a
lot of evidence about the country in the way it is today the facts and the
figures about about our Scotland today and then of course we went to the castle
which I think was quite a momentous occasion certainly for me and I and I
hope for yourselves as well officially Mike Russell MSP handed the task over to
us and we were joined by Louise Caldwell from the Irish assembly who spoke again
about her experiences and I think the evening was ruined it off you know in a
very fitting fashion by Jackie Kay our Scottish what’s the mocker who shared
two poems and with us and all of the outputs and all of the work that you did
during that first weekend and our on the website I don’t know if you’ve had an
opportunity to have a look at that but all of the work is listed there along
with the glossary of terms and we’ve managed to answer 2/3 of the questions
on the Constitution and that you brought to – our expert at that time and so if
you if you want to refresh your memory on those on the website but there’s also
copies paper copies out in the reception desk and of course the the word clothes
about how we felt our country was nigh and how we what felt our country could
be in the future and we’ll we’ll be coming back to those and during the day so a lot has happened out with the room
in those five weeks and there is the general election that we touched on
yesterday and it’s been very hard to miss but I think it’s important as I
mentioned last night that the assembly is not caught up in that and so we’re
not doing the media and we’re not doing the live streaming this this weekend
because as I said last night I think this process is too important to be
caught up in that and it’d be interesting maybe just to reflect on how
you’re feeling about the election how things are how you feel about the
campaign and to really remember the difference between the conduct of the
campaign and how we discuss things in the assembly and we’ll get the
opportunity to refresh our memory on our conversational guidelines that we drew
up last week and in those five weeks between the first weekend and I David
and I have been out and we’ve been talking to quite a number of the
politicians whose voices will be very important in responding to our report in
April and moving that forwards and we’ve also had the chance to speak to the
Children’s Commissioner and Bruce Adamson I want to give my thanks to the
research team and for the data briefing on last weekend I think this is one of
the really interesting points of this process is that we’ve got a research
team who are able to feedback live information to us each weekend so we’re
learning as we go as well as learning at the end and there’s always things to
learn I mean you know continual improvement is is what we’re striving
for but overall 96% of you agreed or strongly agreed that the citizens
assembly is something that you wanted to you wanted to continue as and I think
it’s obvious in the room I think you know that the turnout is phenomenal
again and I think that’s a testament to yourselves and also to the team for
putting they the assembly together so well and all of the data that was
gathered and will is on the website as well so you can kind of look out at
there and in your leisure and reflect on it and there’s also some copies at the
assembly desk as well so as for this weekend a lot of work and thinking has
gone into the agenda and you’ve got the email as I said yesterday from David and
I kind of explaining the the building blocks through the days and you’ve also
got an agenda in your packs and again there’s some spare copies of the
secretary of desk so most of this weekend will be you assembly mayor
members sharing your thoughts listening to each other and coming to some
conclusions and we’ve got three evidence sessions
today this morning we’re hearing from George Bonham from the resolution
foundation M two presentations from George what makes a good life focusing
on evidence around happiness and well-being and how wider quality of life
informs decision making and how we measure what makes a good country and by
coincidence today at the Scottish Parliament the the young people’s
festival of politics is going on and they’re having a session chaired by the
Scottish Youth Parliament considering happiness as well and it’ll be quite
interesting to maybe reflect on their opinions about happiness and our
opinions about happiness and it seems to be clearly a secret that everyone knows
the answer to and so maybe we’ll be able to help with that so after lunch Elka
Hynes from the Edinburgh University is going to be looking at values what makes
a good country and elko we’ll talk about what values are and what rule they play
in determining how people live their lives and how organizations act and the
type of policies our government puts in place so I hope you can see that there’s
a thread going from the personal to the community to the government to the
country and we’ll be working through that today so the evidence that Elka
will be giving us is different to usual facts and figures and it should give you
a different perspective to how we talk about the country and about political
issues and maybe bring in some challenging ideas and it will complement
the evidence that you covered in weekend one and also yesterday evening about how
we are we receive evidence so there’ll be lots of time to think and talk about
these presentations and reflect on what you’ve learnt what surprises you and
what is so it’s very important to you in what you hear and then the rest of the
weekend will be for deliberation and decision-making and upper tables with
the facilitators so you’ll reflect on the weekend one outputs you’ll create
individual statements about the Scotland we are seeking to build
which are important to you in the vision for the country’s future so over the
weekend you’ll agree a vision representing the breadth and diversity
of the views in the assembly and it’s it’ll be important at that stage I think
to remember that it’s not about agreeing with everything and but it’s about
capturing the different views in the room as we’ve reflected on many times
this is a unique opportunity for the breadth and depth of the country to come
together to think about these things so we want to capture that that diversity
but on Sunday morning you’ll get some deeper discussion you’ll be able to get
into some deeper discussion of this vision and walk through the statements
to find a shorter set that that you can all agree on are important to the future
of the country so we’ll be finding also we’ll be
working with that breadth and diversity of ideas and then finding some common
ground and that’s the shared vision of the kind of Scotland that we’re seeking
to build and as you can imagine this will be extremely important and I can’t
reiterate enough how unique this is it’s the first time in Scotland but citizens
you the Assembly members have had the opportunity to have your voices clearly
heard through an intensive and citizen-led
process and finally but really importantly on some day you’ll work
together to decide the priorities that you want to discuss in the future
weekends so a final word before I hand over to Kelly and some of you will have
read the members Diaries on the website and I want to thank the people who have
contributed to that so far I think it really enlivens and the the whole
process particularly for people with the room and would be very pleased if other
assembly members would want to contribute to that as well so if you
feel that you’d like to perhaps make some reflections on your experience so
far please speak to me or to the secretary out and we can allow that to
happen so that’s all I wanted to say this morning thank you again as
sincerely and thanks for listening and here is to a very active
and dynamic week of discussions thank you discussions cuz I’m sure your
continued conversations outside this room I would hope but we certainly have
a very exciting I think impact agenda of learning and discussion and deliberation
this weekend so I really hope that you can get stuck in and that you really
really enjoy it so the first thing I want to do is just to introduce a few
other people that are in the room and then I’m gonna remind everyone of the
conversation guidelines that you generated last time and you should have
access to a printed copy of that on your tables but yes I’m just gonna do some
introductions I’m gonna ask the people to wave when I mention who they are so
in the room with us today there are of course all our wonderful members and you
are the most important part of this process absolutely and we have our team
of table facilitators that are here too and the wonderful support seen that we
have supporting them could I get the support team for this facilitation team
to just give us a wave they’re over there in the corner
you may remember Anthony for sure who was up there last time we also of course
have our Secretariat in the room I see a lot of them over there would you mind
giving a wave there’s quite a few of them all over the place and we also as
we will have every weekend have some observers in the room so they are people
that are coming just to watch the process they’re not here to take part in
it but they will be hanging around and you can have some conversations with
them in the break but they are here to listen and observe could you give us a
wave please observers in the room I believe you’re over there but I can’t
see through the pillar unfortunately and we will also have throughout the process
a few members of the media joining us and we’ll also have the people that are
recording the sessions or live-streaming the sessions of course this this session
is being recorded but the remainder assuming there aren’t any other general
elections will be live streamed so can I please get the media team and also the
sound team to give a wave there we are brilliant and we will of course this
weekend also have two other speakers that will be joining us
I won’t ask them to wave just now because they will be introducing them
themselves to you which will be Elka and George and then finally we also have a
research team are the research team in the room right now there they are just
over there and you’re going to hear from a member of the research team in just a
moment the room okay so I’m now just going to recap the conversation
guidelines that you generated last time I haven’t put them on a slide because
there are 21 of them and it looks like a bit of a mess but you do have access to
some printed copies at your table and I’m just gonna take a moment this might
be for you just a moment to listen and reflect on what I’m saying but I’m going
to read out the 21 conversation guidelines which are quite short just
for the next three or four minutes so good time to reflect then hopefully this
will set us up well for the dialogue and deliberation that’s going to come
through the rest of the weekend okay so the conversation guidelines that were
generated and they have been published now as well I should say on the citizens
of went assembly websites are as follows one person speaking at a time actively
listen to each other give everyone time to talk be open to changing your mind
share airtime don’t grandstand respects the privacy of other members and their
stories and keep things confidential avoid jargon and explain if needed ask
questions there’s no such thing as a stupid question don’t judge others or
make assumptions about their views be mindful of your language and body
language during the discussions use plain language and be aware that English
might not be everyone’s first language respect and value different opinions
take risks in the conversations even if it is scary be honest and this should be
a safe space to share honest opinions that we can agree to work well together
even if we don’t agree get to the point don’t just talk for too long for the
sake of it be kind and supportive of each other be open to learning and maybe
changing your mind keep the topic and trust the process and the facilitators
so they are the conversation guidelines that will guide us as we do this weekend
but also move through the process for all of the future weekends – okay so as
I mentioned we’ve built in lots of opportunity for discussion and
deliberation about the kind of country that we’re seeking to build this weekend
and I’ll tell you a little bit more about that in a short while but before
we do that and just a flag to the research team that I’m going to call up
Oliver in a second we’re going to complete a research task and I’m aware
that you did the research task last weekend this is something we’ll be
continuing throughout the process but Oliver Escobar who is a member of the
research team it’s just going to tell you for a few minutes a little bit more
about that research and then we’re going to move into an icebreaker at our tables
but I’ll let Oliver talk and then when Oliver is finished we’ll be turning into
our tables to complete the research and then undertake a short icebreaker and
I’ll be back soon thank you Thanks hello everybody how are you great
I won I want to start with a massive thanks for all the effort and thought
that you put into filling in the questionnaires last time the material
that we got from that is really extremely useful and we already produced
a small evaluation report but that’s just a tiny part of what we are gonna do
with the material I just want to take the opportunity to remind you very
quickly because lots of things were happening in the first weekend and we
want to make sure that we explain very clearly why we’re doing the research and
also some of the ethical issues around the research but first I just want to
remind you of the research team we are independent from the assembly from the
organizers of the assembly we are five researchers Evelyn who is there in the
corner Evelyn give us a wave great steven is also here today then we have
Nick also that in the corner Elsa Henderson is not here today but she
will be joining us as well and she’s helping with the research as well and
I’m Oliver so that’s the team and we are from two different universities and also
from the Social Research Unit of the Scottish government so it’s a
collaborative process and I just want to tell you very quickly about what we are
doing with the research what type of research we are doing and what is it
that is going to come out of it so as you know we do have these questionnaires
which we hope you see as an opportunity to reflect on what’s going on and to
take a little bit of time to make sure we understand how you are experienced in
the assembly and how you’re thinking about things but we are also making
notes you will see us making observation notes about the dynamics what’s going on
in the room the mood are you are you falling asleep are you enthusiastic are
you that kind of stuff just taking the temperature of what’s going on some
tables just a couple of tables in a couple of sessions throughout the
weekend will be all your recorded your facilitators will explain that these are
randomly selected so most tables are now recorded and when we record it they will
be anonymized so your name’s won’t come I’ll come back to that in a second we
are also gathering materials all the cards and all the lists the statements
you’re going to produce this week and all of that will also be part of the
data set but we are also looking at what’s going on outside the assembly so
we’re going to keep an eye on the media social media as well as traditional
media see how people are telling the story of the Assembly telling the story
of what’s happening throughout the process and we are also going to be
conducting a population survey to see how the rest of the Scottish public
feels about the assembly and relates to the assembly the issues discussed at the
Assembly and to what extent they trust this process and and they how they
relate to it and at some point we will also contact a number of interviews with
organizers but also with other key figures that are going to help us to
understand how the impact of the assembly began the assembly itself so
journalists politicians perhaps now in terms of what we are creating out of
this there are three elements to it one is a data set which means essentially
all the stuff that I just mentioned will be compiling all the material and
creating a data set that then can be accessed by other researchers by people
anywhere in the world because as I said last time there have been a bunch of
these processes elsewhere in other countries and we have learned a lot from
those and now we want to make sure that we learn from this process and we share
that with the world as well and then we’ll have a bunch of publications the
evaluation reports which we are feeding into the organizers between the weekends
so that that learning can feed into the next session but also as you could
expect there will be a final report a research report as well as a bunch of
academic publications and finally I just want to remind you that you have been
very generous but if for whatever reason you don’t want to participate in the
research anymore just let us know some people already let us know and we will
of course respect those wishes this is voluntary it’s based on informed consent
you might remember you filled in that informed consent form last time but if
you want to revisit it or chat to us please come to the research corner the
front corner right there at the front of the room and and finally
as I said before your identity will remain anonymous on anything that we
produced so you might be wondering okay if I’m gonna be anonymous how come there
is an ID code that I need to fill in when I write the questionnaire that’s
for the very simple reason we want to track how your experience involves
throughout the process and this is the only way we can know whether you are
going in thinking and filling a particular way and a particular time and
how those feelings and thoughts evolve over time that’s why there is an ID but
the list of names is in a separate kind of file and you will be destroyed so
eventually the data set will not have your names in it just anonymous
identifiers I hope that’s clear enough but if you got some concerns about
anonymity please do ask us and so I just want to thank you again for what you did
and I really hope that you will help us again we are not going to give you at
least 15 minutes to fill in the first questionnaire of the weekend they’re
going to be – because you fail in a particular way now and you might fail in
a particular way by tomorrow night tomorrow afternoon so there will be two
questionnaires to track that your facilitators got the copies of the
questionnaires please make sure you give each other a little bit of elbow room no
cheating there is no right or wrong answer so
don’t look around there is no point and please do answer I honestly be
brutally honest about every single question and thank you for helping us Veridian thank you please turn to your
tables now the facilitators will guide you through the tasks Thanks why could I bring everyone back to
plenary please something hi everyone so I’m going to
move on to talking about what we’re doing this weekend so you should have
received in advance over the event a copy of an outline agenda and you may
have noted from that that we are planning building lots of opportunity as
I mentioned previously for some discussion and deliberation over the
course of the weekends so really what this weekend is all about it’s just up
here it’s how to engage with evidence by exploring the different kinds of
evidence available and how to think critically about these sources and you
remember some of the presentations that we heard last night that’s very much
connected to that point too we’re also going to hear presentations on what
leads to a good life and a good society and how values influence the kind of
nation we wish to be and that’s where George and Elka will come and speak to
you for a little while today we’re also going to be preparing an answer to the
first question in the assembly remit if you remember there are three questions
there but the first question is what kind of country are we seeking to build
so that’s very much the focus of this weekend and we’re also going to be
agreeing topics for exploration in future meetings of the assembly here so
what we’re doing here we’re really setting the course for what it is that
comes next and we’re doing that in order to start answer it or begin to
answer the questions that are also in the remit so that’s vaguely what we’re
doing this weekend but in a little more detail we are here of course both today
and tomorrow we’ve already been warmly welcomed by the convener and had a brief
introduction there and you’ve just done some reflection on what came out of
weekend one and in a moment we are going to revisit some of the word clouds that
you produced in the first weekend and have a discussion around them so that’s
to come in a moment after I finish speaking and then we’re moving in to the
evidence and discussion sessions and as I mentioned today they’re on what makes
for a good life and what makes for a good country and how can values shape
the country our and the country we want to be and then after that we’re moving
into that deliberation and decision-making around what kind of
country we’re seeking to build and you may remember that Kate in the opening
remarks mentioned something about the creation of statements and when we get
to that point I’ll tell you in a little more detail about how that process is
going to work and then tomorrow so that process will run into more into tomorrow
we’ll be continuing deliberation will be continuing talking about the kind of
country we’re seeking to builds and then we’ll be moving on to setting those
priorities for future work over the rest of the weekends and of course very
importantly we’ll be closing and for those that are heading to lunch there
will be lunch available otherwise we’ll be departing until next time so the
agenda for today and tomorrow we’ll go through the agenda for tomorrow is well
we started we were hopefully or here at nine o’clock and we’ve kicked off you’ve
completed your research questionnaire and just started that process of
reflection and we’ve revisited the conversation guidelines next we’ll be
moving into evidence and discussion so that includes review of some of the word
clouds that came out and then those two sessions with our presenters today there
will be breaks built both into the morning and the afternoon of today so
you will be getting a break and of course be able to go out and get some
teas and coffees or some air if you need that and we’re aiming to break for lunch
at 12:45 and then when we come back from lunch we’re going to continue some of
that evidence and discussion but we’ll be moving on to the session around
values and how they shape the country we are and the country we want to be and
then we’re moving into the really substantive task of the weekend which is
around creating a series of statements of the kind of country we’re seeking to
build and then going through a process to come up with some priorities for
discussion at future weekends which will run into tomorrow so it won’t be
completed today it will run in to tomorrow and then we’re aiming to finish
at half 5:00 today so 5:30 well we just have three
thanks and closing comments from the conveners and then you have some free
time until dinner at 7 o’clock tonight but there are no particular facilitated
facilitated activities this evening so will be a case of just having dinner and
hopefully a really lovely time okay so that is briefly what we’re doing this
weekend and to begin the process now of finding some common ground on the kind
of country that we’re seeking to build we’re going to reconnect and reflect on
one of the outputs from the first weekend which was those word clouds that
we have so this session really is about reflection and it’s about remembering
what it was that we did last time so on your tables and your table facilitators
will probably get these out now you’re going to find a copy of the word clouds
that you created last time so hopefully you remember that process that created a
word cloud and you have a copy of the original version that came up on the
screen and your table facilitator will let you know what some of the words that
came up in that word cloud are as you’re discussing but you’re also going to find
something new but it’s not entirely new because what that other word cloud is
there’s two were clouds is actually just a consolidated version of what it was
you created the first time so you may have noticed that actually in that first
word cloud that you created that a few very well basically the same kinds of
words and comments came out it but word is slightly differently all that
consolidated word cloud is is bringing together those comments that were the
same but it’s quite interesting to see how it may have changed the way that the
things that you came up with look when they’re posted up in a word cloud form
so it basically just presents the information in a slightly different way
and it’s just interesting to see how a process of grouping so grouping things
that are the same or incredibly similar presents information in a different way
and again you might want to reflect on some of the presentations that you heard
last night as you’re just thinking about the content there and yeah so I just
basically like you to spend a few minutes on your table and your table
facilitators can guide this just reflecting on the content of those word
clouds and then we’ll just move into a brief discussion on our tables about
that so yeah take it away and I’ll be back in a moment
okay everyone I hope you found that a really interesting discussion so just so
you know how we’re kind of dealing with some outfits from this assembly process
so the word clouds that you created in the first weekend we have actually only
shown you one of them you did create two word clouds the other one if you
remember was what’s special about Scotland so that hasn’t come back today
but all of those word clouds that you produce those two word clouds they have
been included in the event report which will be which has been published and is
accessible for both everyone in this room but others out with the room to
refer to so they have that reflection of what came out of each weekend and we
introduced a new thing just there which was that consolidated word cloud so just
to clarify it was interesting hearing some of the questions that came up it’s
not a case that we took the word cloud that you produced and added new words
what happened there was a process that we call consolidation where we took the
words that you produced if we looked for words that were basically the same or
similar or making the same point and we put them together to basically just
produce one statement and that’s why they look quite different and we thought
it’d be interesting to bring both versions of that back especially given
the presentations and the conversations we had last night where we heard about
how we kind of look at information in different ways the different ways
information can be presented so we thought it’d be interesting to explore
that in a discussion but with something tangible on the table that also
connected to something that you’d brought out so thank you very much for
that and thank you for for capturing some of the key points that came out of
your discussion again when we capture points that come out of your discussion
that all feeds in to the event report too so we capture that learning
and we make sure that that’s reflected for you to remember what you’ve done
every weekend but also others out with the room to know what’s being discussed
and what you all think so thank you for that so I’m just going to introduce the
next session in a short while Kate the convener is going to come over and
introduce the first of two speakers for the weekends and they’ll be talking to
us about happiness and what makes for the good life I also wanted to introduce
a new and empty chair that you may have noticed at each of your tables or will
be coming soon for one of the tables I see that hasn’t got one yet we’ve
introduced this just to test it out for this weekend it wasn’t something we had
last weekend the purpose of the listening chair is for the conveners to
come around and sit at your table and listen to the discussion that you’re
having they’re not coming around to take part in the discussion they’re simply
there to listen and that helps them reflect on some of the discussions
you’re having as we go along the way when we have a speaker this weekend that
chair will be used for the speaker to join your table when you’re reflecting
on the things that they’ve talked about in their presentations if you have any
questions you’d like to ask them so the speakers are allowed to talk when they
come to your table but otherwise for any other purpose it is just a listening
chair and whoever sits in it is just there to listen so we’ll be starting
that process just after this session that we’re about to complete now but
first of all before we get into any presentations anything like that we’re
going to talk about happiness and there is a reason that we’re asking you to
think and talk about happiness and I hope that will become clearer as we move
through the day so to begin this I would just like you to spend five or so
minutes just having a personal reflection about what makes you happy
you’re welcome to use materials if you would like on your table to capture that
but you could just also sit there and think about what makes you happy and
then we’re going to have a lovely table discussion I hope about happiness
and that will set off Auto hopefully a joyful course for the rest of the day so
off we go okay can I bring everyone back together now please seems like there’s
loads to talk about about happiness which is lovely really good stuff thank
you thank you very much thank you so I hope you enjoyed that discussion and as
I said before hopefully I’ll become clearer why we’ve had that discussion as
we move throughout the week ends in a moment I’m gonna welcome Kate over to
introduce our first speaker of the weekend
both today I should say but first I just wanted to touch on a couple of process
points so as all of our presenters are talking you’re very welcome to make
notes in whatever way you like making notes and to you know bear in mind any
questions that emerging and things like that we’re gonna use the red and yellow
card system again so just to remind you what that system is if you raise a
yellow card during any of the presentations that means that you’re
asking the presenter to slow down there may be talking a little bit too quickly
and I also don’t mind if you do it for me either so please to if I do that
throughout the weekend you also have a red card and that red card means that
you want the speaker to repeat or to clarify something that they’ve just said
and they might be mindful that actually maybe they need to explain it in a
slightly different way to how they originally explained it to so that’s how
the card system worked oh I did oh I see I’m glad I saw it I will say it is a
little bit difficult for one of the tables at the back to have the view of
the speaker card but we have informed table facilitators in advance that some
of the sight lines aren’t entirely perfect so they have been instructed to
to hold up a card on the tables behalf as well if it’s clear that you want to
flag someone so if you are sitting at one of those tables and you would like
the table facilitator just to get up and maybe peep around one
of the columns in the room just maybe show the card to them and they have been
instructed to do that on your behalf so I would like to just welcome Kate now to
give the introduction and then Anthony is going to emerge from behind this
banner and just switch to the presentation because we have it in PDF
okay and Thank You Kelly and can I just say again that I hope the listening
chairs are working I found it quite useful and I’m really quite taken with
the passion and the humor with which you’re engaging with these tasks and so
I hope we don’t tear you out too much during during today and tomorrow and I’m
delighted to introduce George bang um who is a policy analyst at the
resolution foundation and that is a leading independent economic think tank
working to improve the living standards of families on low and middle income
George’s research looks at wealth inequality labor markets and well-being
and he’s discussed these topics on BBC TV and radio and he previously worked as
a policy and public affairs officer at osebo which is the charity sector trade
body and he also studied history and economics at university so I think an
ideal person to lead us through this next session his presentation will be in
two parts first what makes for a good life building on our discussions this
morning and that’s going to focus on the statistical evidence on individual
happiness and well-being so I think you’ll find a lot of statistical
information that will you’ll be able to reflect upon your own thoughts on your
personal happiness and second the discussion will be about good life
beyond happiness and into other aspects of well-being and the two are obviously
inextricably linked but but are quite different and it’s considering how wider
quality of life informs decision decision-making and in and the
importance and how we measure and what makes a good country so I’m sure you’ll
find this informative and it will also be flesh out some of the
the emotional aspects that you’ve been thinking about this morning so George
thanks very much brilliant good morning everyone
it’s lovely to be up here I’ve traveled over night on the Caledonian sleeper and
I’m glad that it arrived and I’ve come from London where I work at the
resolution foundation so as Kate explained we’re a think-tank that works
on economic policy so we work on things like trying to raise pay trying to
improve job quality and some of the high-profile things that we’re involved
with also things like calculating the real living wage so that the higher one
that’s higher than what the government calls a living wage so some of you might
have come across that but I’m here today to talk about well-being and happiness
and I guess what I’m going to start with is just an explanation to say that some
of what I’m talking about might seem quite obvious you might think why do you
need someone to travel over to tell us all of this but my kind of plea to you
is bear with me and just trust I suppose to start with that this is based on
quite a lot of statistical analysis we basically what I’m presenting in this
first session is based on a household survey which is done by the Office for
National Statistics every year and they ask 320,000 people across the country
about a whole range of things including well-being so that’s what these might be
pretty pictures but there is some kind of actual analysis underlying them so
just to reassure you anyway let’s get going so what I’m talking
about in this first talk is just personal well-being so individual people
I’m calling it happiness but let’s just say well-being in general for the time
being and we’re talking about some of the individual characteristics about
individual people which are associated with them having higher personal
well-being so that’s kind of the way into this topic and then in the second
talk after we’ve had time for some discussion will will will sort of
broaden out and look at more societal well-being so what happens when we
also come together but first of all let’s think about some individual
characteristics associated with personal hire personal well-being the first group
so first our question the question mark and first group of characteristics are
things which are not typically things that policymakers can have too much
influence over so these are just individual characteristics which are
associated with people’s well-being in the statistics so let’s take them one by
one I promise you’re not going to be very many charts but this is one of them
so this is looking at the influence of age so the basic story here in this
chart is that as you move from left to right that’s over the course of
someone’s adult lifetime and you can see that the line is high on the left hand
side so that tells you that teenagers tend to have quite high life
satisfaction and then life satisfaction slowly goes down basically during
people’s early working lives I don’t be too pessimistic you can guess maybe
where I am on this chart and then it reaches a low point in people’s early
50s and then at that point it sort of turns a corner and people’s life
satisfaction on average starts going up and as they get closer to retirement age
and then reaches a lifetime peak in around the age of 70 the way that the
Sun newspaper wrote this up for some research that I did earlier in the year
was to pick out some people who were at the age at the low point in their early
50s so their headline was if you want to be happy don’t be two men off the aid at
that age and they chose David Cameron and Gordon Ramsay so that was that’s a
bit of life advice here okay on to the next so that’s a summary here teenagers
and seventy year olds tend to have higher personal well-being people in
their early 50s the lowest on to sex this one might surprise you but even
after you take into account lots of other personal characteristics women
tend to report higher personal well-being than men do next
relationships this is probably into the realms of the obvious but might surprise
you the statistics show that accounting for
lots of other things people who are in who report themselves
as being married or in a civil partnership tends to have higher
personal well-being than people who say that they are single and then lastly a
bit about geography again this is not something that policy can immediately
affect but there is quite a lot of variation around the UK and within
Scotland about yeah with people’s personal well-being so if you just
compare this by region Northern Ireland is consistently
not only the highest but also the highest improving region for personal
well-being but of course you will want to I guess maybe look at how this varies
around Scotland itself so this I really apologize this is quite small because
there’s quite a lot of local authorities in Scotland but this is average life
satisfaction in the most recent data in each local authority in Scotland I’ll
just pick out some quick patterns and oh I’m sorry yes and I’m gonna read this
out I don’t expect that it’s it’s it’s very clear to read so I will explain so
the the highest life satisfaction on average tends to be in the highlands and
islands so the Orkney Islands are way ahead up
at the top in on my Scottish geography is not as good at yours so I’m not going
to go through every single one of these but maybe if we just look down and
towards the bottom the lowest average well-being life satisfaction is in
Glasgow City so not too far from here and other local authorities towards the
lower end are the West Lothian West Dunbartonshire five and Stirling so
we’ll just stick to those five for the time being but the key thing here is
that perhaps surprisingly people’s self-reported life satisfaction does
vary quite significantly significantly depending on where they live and bear in
mind that this is true even after you control for things like average age or
average income in different local authorities okay so those are the
individual characteristics that policymakers can’t necessarily affect
the ones which is a as an economic analyst think about more are the ones
that policy can do something to impact so here we go we’re going to take
four of those in turn so the first factor this is actually the single most
significant predictor of an individual’s personal well-being and it’s how they
report their health as being so someone who reports higher health individually
is very very likely to have quite high personal well-being as well maybe not
that surprising but this is true even after you control them or take into
account lots of other factors now the next one is income perhaps even more
obvious you might say higher household income we’re talking about here is
associated with individuals having higher personal well-being but it’s not
as simple as just a straight-line relationship it turns out that the the
returns from higher income diminish as someone’s income goes up so if you so
we’re going to get onto this in more detail later on but if you just had a
thousand pounds and you were going to give that to somebody it would do more
to raise the well-being of somebody with a household income of say 10,000 pounds
then it would to raise the well-being of someone with a high household income of
say 50,000 pounds so we’ll get onto the implications of that later but I hope
that that is clear for the time being one more thing
work status is quite significantly associated with personal well-being
again so the the economics work status that reports highest well-being is
people who are retired that’s followed by people who are self-employed followed
by people who are employed followed by people who are unemployed so that might
be what you expected I don’t know but and this is true even if you take into
account people’s incomes so self-employed people may be value value
autonomy or other things it’s also worth noting that job quality matters quite a
lot so people say that they’re unhappy say with their working hours or
something like that that tends to be associated with lower personal
well-being as well last of these economic factors is housing tenure so
that’s the type of whether people are owners or renters so the basic story is
that owners tend to be happier than renters
or have higher life satisfaction and that’s true even if you take into
account the different characteristics on average of someone who owns a home
versus someone who rents and this is also true when you take into account
income so that kind of suggests that you know it people that report higher
personal well-being if they’re homeowners not just because home owning
is lower cost than renting on average and but also because there’s some other
more kind of qualitative things that have an impact so maybe the fact that
homeowners have more security of housing tenure is important here although of
course Scotland is ahead of the rest of the UK on this and that private renters
have more security than private renters elsewhere in the UK but anyway this this
suggests that you know for a policymaker that making sure people feel that you
know that they’re not going to be you know moved out of their home by a
landlord or something is a really important really important for their
personal well-being as well so that’s it to introduce the first session I’ve
tried to be quite brief but I think I’m going to hand back over to the
facilitators and look forward to just continuing the conversation in a moment
thank you wonderful thank you so much George so
we’re now gonna turn back into our tables for a brief reflection on what
you heard don’t forget that you can flag George to come to your table if you have
any questions that have come up you’re very welcome to ask those questions
please do be mindful that there are 14 tables and one George
so please do share him as evenly as possible but just to flag George you can
raise the blue card on your table that the table facilitator has and we’ll be
back in a little while Thanks finally I’ve got my own glass on
my own pin and so welcome back everybody I think that little break oh it was very
useful do recognize that it is a beautiful day outside in Glasgow so do
take the advantage of getting some fresh air during the breaks and thank you
again for the kind of rich tapestry of discussion that you’re having before the
break I am it’s really such an honor to be able to wander about and hear
people’s and very considered contributions and so please recognize
that we are absolutely on top of the value of what of what you’re putting
into this process so I’m gonna welcome George back to give his second
presentation and but before I do that I wanted to have a little thing about
people who aren’t in the room with us and children and young people as I said
earlier on David and I were lucky enough to meet with the Children’s Commissioner
Bruce Adamson and we mentioned the Scottish Youth Parliament they’re having
a session today at at the Parliament in Edinburgh so at the Assembly Secretariat
desk you you’ll see that we’ve got a summary of copies of work that children
have already prepared and on their vision for the kind of Scotland that
they want to live in and that’s from a report produced by the children’s
Parliament in 2017 so again I think it could be very
interesting for you to reflect on their thoughts and to maybe have a look at
what they’ve come up with and if you want to see the full report it can be
accessed via the members area on the citizens assembly website and also
there’s a beautiful display I don’t know if you saw it out in the atrium of a
kind of a pie chart of the key issues that children hold important and dear to
themselves and it’s also beautiful drawings and pictures which is always a
joy for me as an arts worker and so in George’s talk he’ll also reference this
and but you may not be aware that Scotland is widely recognized as a world
leader in well being government and this is demonstrated through the national
performance framework so the framework that the government have set out to
track their activity and achievements it puts well-being em at the very center
of policymaking across government and wider public sector and partnerships
working with also the third sector that charitable sector and private sectors
and for those interested in learning more about this we’ve also put a link on
them on the website in the members area and to that framework and it may just be
interesting for you to reflect on that as our discussions move forwards and
there’s also a range of other resources that you might find interesting
but for an eye I know you find George’s fresh talk very informative very useful
in in these building blocks as where as we’re moving through the weekend so I’m
delighted to be able to ask him to take a stand again and tell us more about
well-being and why it’s important for a good country thank you Thank You Kate hello again everyone and
so I really enjoyed the discussions that we had on the tables and after the first
talk and those were all obviously about personal well-being so that’s one side
of this but the idea of the second part of this session is just take a step back
a little from personal well-being and ask more about the well-being of a whole
society how do we start to define that and if we do define it how do we try and
measure it and this fits into a just a broader approach to kind of quality of
life as being something that government ought to be directly trying to and the
countries ought to be directly trying to improve and I guess the underlying
argument that I’m assuming is that if we are trying to improve something like
that we want a way to try and measure it so obviously that’s key to all of this
so I’m going to start actually with some history just on how policymakers in the
last 100 years roughly have measured the quality of life for society’s well-being
and the short answer is that they’ve tended to do it using money so many of
you will probably have heard of the word GDP gross domestic product and my
picture to illustrate that is a bit unexpected maybe it’s a battleship from
the Second World War the reason for using that is that gross domestic
product was invented in the 1930s and what this concept is it’s a measure of
the value in money terms of all the goods and services produced in one year
in an economy so when people talk about the size of the British economy or the
size of the Scottish economy what they mean is defined with this now quite you
know it’s been going for a long time since the 30s this measure of GDP but
we’ve always known for a long time that when GDP goes up when your national
income goes up that doesn’t necessarily translate into any meaningful change in
quality of life for individual people so in a sense the idea of this the second
part of this session is to think about how can we build a framework which does
take into account when we’re trying to define quality of life both the
individual personal well that we thought about in the first
session and some kind of more national level measures that bring in things like
inequality you know what how is how are things distributed across a society
because it might be the average well-being was going up even if many
people were not seeing any improvement in their individual circumstances so the
most poetic description of the shortcomings with a money approach to
well-being for me at least was given in 1968 by Bobby Kennedy the younger
brother of John F Kennedy for the US president so in this year Bobby Kennedy
was running for president and he memorably described GDP as measuring
everything in short except that which makes life worthwhile so we know that
money can’t buy happiness it can’t buy love or any other things but it’s this
is a nice way to you know think about the shortcomings basically so we do have
a different form of money measure now I apologize this I love charts so I
couldn’t resist having another one but this is a graph which each bar
represents a year and the old the more recent years are towards the right-hand
side and the main message to take away what this chart is telling you is how
much typical household incomes across the whole UK grew each year in the last
25 years so tall bars which are mainly on the left-hand side tells you that in
the 1990s household incomes in Britain were growing quite quickly and then you
see them slowed down and in the ten years since the financial crisis in 2008
you can see that average household incomes have either fallen or grown not
very much so this is what economists like my colleagues tend to use normally
when we’re talking about living standards this isn’t just an alternative
source of money measure and it is quite informative it does correlate it sorry
it is linked household incomes do link with some other meaningful things that
we think link to quality of life but there is a more radical alternative that
we’ve already started talking about now this is only designed to try and scare
you I’m not going to try and explain a production function like this so I’m
cross it out and say the simple alternative is not using much money at
all if we want to know people’s well-being as individuals we just ask
them so now we’re coming back to where we were just talking what we’re talking
about in the first presentation so an example of one of the questions that is
asked in the surveys that I was talking about in the first presentation is this
one which is asking about life satisfaction
so in those 320,000 people who get surveyed each year by the government one
of the four questions about their personal well-being that they get asked
is this one overall how satisfied are you with your life nowadays and when
they answer that the people who are surveyed pick a number between zero and
ten where zero is very low well-being and ten is very high personal well-being
and this might seem quite simplistic but it is surprisingly powerful as an
insight into personal well-being and it is also meaningfully linked with money
measures of well-being so this is a promise the last chart so please bear
with me this is telling us how two measures of
personal well-being the life satisfaction measure and the happiness
measure our links with household incomes so along the horizontal axis of this
chart you have household incomes running from 0 up to a hundred thousand pounds a
year and on the vertical axis you have average personal well-being of people at
that level of household income and so the basic take-home message is you can
see as you move from the bottom left up towards the top right well-being gets
higher as household incomes get higher so there is a link so money is not
completely unrelated to to personal well-being but it’s not just a straight
forward relationship that money will buy you all of the good things in life in
life we all know that in a sense but it’s good to kind of see the stats as
well and the well-being data that we were talking about before
when we are trying to fit it into this broader framework about quality of life
also tells us some things that we didn’t necessarily know when we were just
looking at money money money measures of well-being so these are just some quite
details examples maybe but we’ve already seen that in an increase in income is
worth more for people on low incomes than it is for people on high incomes if
you just want to raise well-being by as much as you can we also know from
personal well-being measures that unemployment is bad for people’s
well-being not just because their income goes down but but also because of you
know the other the other aspects of quality of life that might get affected
if you if you’re out of work we also know that homeownership is good not
because not only because it tends to be lower cost but also because it gives
people a broader psychological sense of security and lastly one just about
economic downturns recessions surprisingly those don’t make any impact
on personal well-being on average across the whole population but we can see in
the data that I’ve been talking about individual people who lose their jobs or
lose income they are quite badly affected by recessions so maybe this is
a good this is an alternative case for doing our best to you know to prevent
economic crises which will kind of know anyway but this is a new viewpoint on it
okay so we’ve we’ve kind of now had a look at the problems with money measures
of well-being and then we’ve also seen some of the new personal well-being
measures which have been developed and so the kind of where where we where I’d
like to finish this discussion is basically trying to bring all of that
together in some sort of broader frameworks of how do we define quality
of life across a whole society in a way that takes into account money but also
takes into account asking people directly because we’ve seen that these
different measures of well-being are all quite powerful in themselves and so for
the rest of the presentation I’ve basically got two frameworks which have
been developed by by governments and others to bring together all of these
different measures of quality of life and
then I’m gonna conclude just by asking you some questions in a sense as to what
what things should you be considering if you’re trying if you were trying to
develop your own idea of what what what what’s a good life and how could how
could Scotland change the way that it measures that in the future
I’m also as Kate said in her introduction it’s worth saying Scotland
is is one of the world leaders in this so I’m conscious that I work you know I
know much less than many people in Edinburgh around this and around this
country about this so I’m just doing a sort of edited highlights of work which
is done by many other hundreds of people so one of the two frameworks which I’m
going to introduce just briefly is one done by the OECD so just to say what
that organization is it’s an association of 40 governments in the richest
industrialized countries so the British government is a member of it and what
the OEC does is it basically it does research on how governments can work
better and so the government’s pull their resources and then they produce
publications which can then inform how those government’s work and the OECD has
been a real pioneer in these kind of Broad’s frameworks for how you define
and measure quality of life and then how you use those frameworks to try and
improve the way the governments work so this is the OECD’s there’s a this is
like my picture version of the OECD’s framework and so you’ll see you’ll see
this better in your own sheets I suppose there’s 11 different measures that they
use to define what means quality of life in the round and some of these are to do
with money so some of them are just income some of them have to do with work
but then there’s some other more kind of totally non money based things like
health and you’ll see on the left hand side life satisfaction reappears so
that’s where this the personal well-being that we were talking about
earlier that kind of fits in as one small part of this much broader
framework that defines quality of life so I’m just going to pick out quickly
two of those things one is civic engagement because this is what we’re
doing here today at the Assembly so the OECD has four different
indicators by which measures civic engagement voter turnout a measure of
gender inequality social inequality and then citizens in gate engagement with
lawmaking in a particular country and then moving through a bit quickly the
sec the other part of the framework i’ll pick out is just to do with housing
quality so the the aspects of housing quality that the oecd framework says is
important are the number of rooms per person that the average person has in a
country in their house the num the proportion of dwellings in that country
which have only basic facilities thankfully very low in the UK and then a
measure of housing costs so you will see here that Britain or the UK comes 39 out
of 40 countries in this sample of rich industrial countries for housing costs
so that says that housing is pretty expensive here by any international
standard now the other framework to conclude is
an even prettier picture and this summarizes the Scottish Government’s own
national performance framework some of you might have heard of it’s been around
it was first thought up in 2007 so it’s been going for 12 years so far and it’s
been through a few iterations as it’s been developed and this used to be
something that the Scottish government just used internally to evaluate its own
performance it’s now become a much more kind of public focused way to
communicate how the government thinks about what it’s aiming to do to improve
people’s lives and then how it measures that so along with Iceland and New
Zealand Scotland is now one of the few countries which has kind of has really
seriously thought about how do we define our kind of purpose as a government as a
devolved administration and then how do we kind of turn that into a number of
measurable outcomes that we can hold ourselves accountable to maybe there is
a case to be said now that this framework is summarizing 81 separate
indicator and that so there is a case to say that
you know this is now getting really very complex and there is research going on
by people in this room in fact not me to try and turn those 81 indicators back
into a kind of simpler you know clearly understandable single number because
that is what the money measure like GDP that is what the advantage is that it’s
this single very clear measure and even if it doesn’t really tell us much about
well-being it is something that a whole government can kind of move towards but
just to kind of conclude please don’t look too much of a slide because I think
the language here is not very clear but these are just four of my own questions
to ask if you’re looking at these frameworks for society’s well-being and
thinking about what what would be your own version that you as an assembly
would propose for Scotland and I’m going to suggest one is just to think about
this is not an either/or the first one but subjective or objective maybe I’ll
call this societal well-being personal well-being or societal well-being
there’s these two approaches that we’ve been discussing how do you balance those
two together my personal view and maybe this is just the research I’ve done is
biased a bit more towards the personal well-being measures because those are
those are very simple and you can summarize them in one or two numbers
rather than having 81 separate indicators but then there are strengths
and weaknesses of both so the second question is just how many measures
should should we be using it’s much easier for a government to be
accountable if it says we are going to try and improve this one target and then
you know we know at the end of the year whether or not they’ve done that now of
course as soon as you cut as soon as you start targeting something like that
arguably other priorities get you know become less important so it has a it
causes problems but something to think about the third one is a bit more of a
subtle point I suppose just to say if you as a government set out to improve
well-being do you then say you’re going to do that by just trying to maximise
your particular measure of well-being or do you say you’re going to just try and
improve the the underlying factors that you know
will raise people’s well-being so for example we saw that better quality
housing is associated with higher personal well-being now your target as a
government or as an assembly might be to say we just want higher well-being or
you might think it’s more productive to say we want better quality housing in
the knowledge that that will probably lead to higher well-being so those are
two different things and hopefully that’s clear but we’d be good to come
back to discuss it and then the last one is a question that actually was first
raised for me talking to people in the New Zealand government about how their
well-being framework is working and that one is essentially what priority do you
give to the personal well-being measures compared to the traditional money
well-being measures because when push comes to shove when difficult decisions
get made in a government I don’t think any government that uses well-being at
the moment as an indicator it has got to a stage where trying to maximize a
particular well-being measure is going to override a policy that’s aimed
improving GDP or national income so at the moment the if it becomes a contest
between a policy that will improve personal well-being and one that will
just improve money measures the money measures will probably win out so I
guess that’s something to decide basically and I don’t have an answer for
you so that’s it from me but look forward to continuing the conversation
around your tables thank you wonderful thank you very much for that
George so just like last time we are gonna turn into our tables now and
reflect on that we’re gonna reflect on what what makes for the good life and
for a good country you can use the blue card again to get George to come over to
your table and then after this we are going to do a little bit of room
feedback from key points of your discussion so please turn to your tables
now with the back soon thank you okay everyone can I please
bring everyone back to the room back to the room please
I have nothing to ding this time thank you thank you dinging crew okay
so we’re gonna do a little bit of sharing in the room just now
so what’s about to happen is myself I have a mic and Kayla over there also
with a mic we’re going to come to each of the tables in turn and we are going
to ask you to share with the room using this microphone one thing that you
thought was important from your discussion a little twist you can’t say
the same thing that another table has said I know I know I hope you’ve got
backups I hope you’ve got backups and we’d like you to do that because we’d
like to hear as many different views coming out in the room so I’m gonna
start if that’s all right I hope the mic is on sound desk all good table 8
coming to you affordable housing socializing okay I’m
not sure everyone heard that one either but affordable housing and social
housing definitely came out there as being important so now I’m going to come
to this table hope is okay to see my table mental health okay that actually
treat mental health was important for a good country table number nine so that
was not having working poor in society thank you so I felt that M there’s a lot sharper
short-termism so it’s a bit investing for the long term and long term thinking
across different governments and having some continuity and okay so very clearly that idea of
long-term thinking and long-term investments with the social
responsibility so again some people didn’t quite hear
that one so yeah there is say with my microphone it’s no one else so Kelly
could do one we repeat any effect so this was social responsibility for
environment for our own well-being enable this ok table 13 we kept coming
back to you need to reflect a more compassionate quality driven agenda and
stop punishing the less-advantaged okay so that key point about compassion is
really important there came across guitar as we move through the tables
Table four you’re up okay Table four and people in Peyer need to be real people
in touch with real issues is that microphone working a little bit better
for people we just switched mics can you hear this one yeah
excellent table 11 we talked quite a lot about training and
education opportunities but the main thing that came out about table as more
opportunities to learn well um so that siblings and get to the income I should yep so that idea of learning while you
learn and move career progression and things like that as well thank you okay
so table 2 and it was all about economic wealth distribution and the cost of
being sure so the end the unjustice of that table sex and we talked with many
of those issues for the unique one we talked about it was transport as a rate
because people need to be able to access transport to go to access the services
they need for quality of life too take place and that amongst other
services had implications for public explained each other and that transfer
ID being quite particular in sort of areas of Scotland I would imagine that
came out so over here at Table one well we talked about a lot of issues that
been raised already but maybe drawing them all together we talked about how
they’re all interconnected and it’s really hard to separate them so the
table was quite positive but the idea of looking at well-being as a whole and
some of the frameworks that were presented so we like the idea of you
know recognising the interconnection of everything in TiVo 7 we talked about the
importance of education jobs and housing and how their length and particularly
how we don’t have equal and fair access to education which dogs or need jobs
which dogs are into housing so we really need to break the cycle of unfairness
thank you okay well yeah I think most of the things that have been mentioned we
talked about as well going to draw attention I guess to just cohesive
communities and caring communities with a focus on the well-being of everyone in
the communities particularly children and young people and their being
employment for for youth for young people youth employment Table five I
think is our last one so you can see what we’ve got left so we had a similar
theme around and porty and inequality so we wanted to develop a measure around
reducing inequality among different groups in society and also and a focus
on early intervention and investment and public services so that we can help to
reduce that really and pervasive inequality in our society thank you
brilliant thank you so much everyone um can we just pause and give each other a
round of applause for completing their morning thank you everyone excellent stuff so some of you may have
noticed so I have just put lunch up on the next slide so we are heading into
our lunch break just now where we need to head for lunch again is the main
plaza so that’s that area by the reception and we would like you back in
the room please by 1:45 and we’ll continue the afternoon thank you so much
everyone hello again oh I think we’ve solved some of the microphone issues can
I just get a notification from the back of the room this is clear and load
enough yes good okay and so welcome back everybody and thank you very much for
getting back into the room on time I hope you had a bit of maybe fresh air I
stretched the legs a bit of chart and M we are ready for the afternoon so it’s
my pleasure now to introduce our second speaker for the day
dr. Elka Heinz she is a senior lecturer in social policy at the University of
Edinburgh and Elka’s research and teaching focuses on comparative welfare
state policies and in particular around the labor market labor market policy as
well as the politics of welfare and well-being so you can see reflecting
back on our statements that we brought from the tables just before lunch that
Elka’s specialism and expertise links very closely to that so Elka is going to
be providing evidence on values and what makes a good country and and you’ll hear
what values are and what role they play in determining how people live their
lives and now for me that I can’t quite understand how that all fits together
yet what values and what role they play in determining how people live their
lives so I’m really looking forward to this talk to kind of unpack that
sentence m and it also looks at how organisations act and what type of
policies are governme puts in place so it’s taking that I hope
that golden thread from the personal to the group to the community to the
government to the country and the purpose of hearing this from Elka is to
help you consider how values shape the country we are and the country we want
to be so I feel this will be another incredibly useful building block in our
learning Elka thank you very much thank you very much and so I’ll talk about
venues as what’s described so to start with well what are various actually so
various are very basic fundamental beliefs we heard about the word they
shape our attitudes and they motivate us so if we follow our values that should
make it really easy to make decisions so they should determine what we deem as
important and should somehow express what we deem is good worthwhile
desirable and and they really should help us on a personal level to kind of
guide our decisions and and give us some kind of structure for for conduct and
now various are not really just anything very abstract values is also something
that can be measured and in lots of philosophers social psychologists and so
on have have tried to to theorize and have tried to measure values this is
just one example a very famous example of of a theory of human values so this
is a model that has been tested around the world in many different countries
and cultures and it’s by somebody called Shalom Schwartz the theory of basic
human various and it’s it’s not a coincidence that this model is in this
sort of circular shape so the argument is and that is also what has been found
that there are ten different domains of values and neighbouring domains are
related to each other so people who would
that they are very highly valuing things like tradition and conformity would also
probably highly value security and and the logic is so that that means domains
which are represented next to each other they they are related to each other and
and the one that is sort of opposite it’s probably then something that you
don’t value if you if you rather value something like security very highly it’s
quite unlikely that you also like self-direction and you can see how there
is potentially some kind of conflict between these or for example power and
benevolence they don’t really go that much together so when I said this has
been tested it has been validated across many colleges what they’ve done is that
they’ve given questionnaires to people with something like you know nearly 60
questions people were then making statements how much they agree or
disagree with a statement and and then it was indeed found that these values
are basically universal they can be found in every society and in every
society people would say that you know these ways which are related next to
each other are really shared by by people and and if they are sharing
certain ways they are they are basically opposing other values and I’m saying
later something about how now the kind of dominance of certain values is spread
over cultures that is something else so this model is just to show you that if
something Universal about values ways are recognized basically across the word
now I mainly toxify about personal values and as I said this really gives
us a sort of guideline this kind of idea of what is right what is wrong what we
should keep in mind it’s the sort of last point here my slide that values may
or may not be considered moral so if we if I just go back for a second again to
this this picture here so there is this domain that is called self enhancement
something like power is it’s a sub-domain in here and some people might
think you know that is not very moral to kind of basically see dominance
some people might really object to this now this doesn’t mean that it’s it’s
wrong it’s still a right value if this is what gives you direction for your
action so yeah we can certainly have lots of discussions and I guess you will
have these discussions about what are we somehow considering legitimate or not so
legitimate but if somebody really lives their life according to the value of
seeking power then that’s fine that’s not there’s nothing wrong with that
now I just want to give you a brief moment of reflection now this is a list
which is totally random it’s just poured from the internet there is no theory
nothing nope psychosocial testing behind this it’s a list of this is just a
snapshot ultimately it’s the ultimate 400-person of values but it really is a
list of nouns but just to give you an idea of you know what we could consider
a value or not now we’ll just take a moment just for yourself don’t talk to
your neighbor anybody just think about you know what are your values if you
want you can take note write something down you can come up with a whole long
list of values you can just come up with one value that’s fine just for yourself
to reflect and maybe think about where do your values come from it’s just some
kind of past experience is it the way you were brought up things you were
taught when you were little the context you grew up in certain country maybe not
everybody might have been born in Scotland and that might influence your
various maybe there’s an old school motto that still rings in your head so
just take kind of so okay you have lots of time nature
want you to discuss and reflect on this so we stop here really just to emphasize
because I really want to make sure that we’re not judging judgmental about this
at all today so it’s totally fine some people are being driven by values which
some others might not deem their positive so you know some people might
be driven by things like self-interest or meat but as long as they are driving
somebody and motivating somebody and giving some guidance or conduct that’s
that’s fine it’s a value you might disagree with it just shut up so they
use this one instead so um so if I talked about personal values but various
is also something that is shared by organizations by businesses and actually
by whole countries and cultures so I’m now moving on to corporate values and
maybe you actually worked in yourself for company or have worked for a company
that had one of these mission statements and mission statements are exactly doing
that expressing a very you a value that gives this company direction this sort
of goal they want to strive for and and I know we had lunch and some people
might fall a bit asleep and in order to prevent this from I have a little quiz
for you so I have three value statements here three mission statements and I give
you a selection of four different companies organizations
what do you think the first one which company does this correspond to to
refresh the world in mind body and spirit to inspire moments of optimism
and happiness through our brands and actions coca-cola okay I guess the
Refresh giving it away now the next one together we built a diverse inclusive
open and honest work environment and are always looking for people who share our
positive attitude and values we are guided by the vision to create a better
everyday life for the many people here you’re very well informed that’s right
and then the last one it’s not a statement it’s just a list of five
things safety respect excellent excellence courage and one team are the
five VP yeah so I was kind of hoping that you thought that maybe my own
organization the University of Edinburgh would talk about happiness and optimism
and just for the kind of completeness of the record they don’t I mean it starts
quite well so the mission of our university is the creation dissemination
and curation of knowledge I think so far so good did you know this some Oliver
are you here so I think that’s quite fine and then it gets really worthy and
I guess it’s getting more into kind of selling ourself and rather stating a a
various statement so the the term were leading features twice and this idea to
measure our performance against the highest international standards so that
is the University of Edinburgh for you but I guess what these examples show is
that that value statements can really just be a list of things you know like
the BP thing five values or you can have something very wordy and complicated and
clearly coca-cola is doing this much better than the University of Edinburgh
but I suppose I have a bigger PR budge and her budget as well but now moving on
to the sort of next level college surveys now a lot of cultural values are
really related to religious belief religious values so typically you know
beliefs of based into the existence or
non-existence of God some religions some microphone again I don’t know it is that
bad is that better do I need to hold it closer is that
better one time okay I think I’m back to the
first microphone is that better can you hear me and yeah okay I tried to
hold it close to my mouth so I’m yes so cultural values have a
very close connection to two religious values so and was over okay is this better yeah okay and so
there was the last point on that right no it wasn’t em so yeah you can see how
how really there’s a close connection to kind of religious beliefs and and
culture values and and the kind of tradition that comes with it as well and yeah and I thought oh yeah a good
example for something might be the Ten Commandments if you think about that
these are in some way value statements as well in some very old-fashioned form
probably now as I said values are universally accepted and the relation
between different value domains and how they motivate our behavior that it’s
related and that has been found across many cultures you know in the world now
this is a map which is based on on on a longitudinal study which which runs
across many many countries again that again across the world and which is
called the world value survey and and and one of the authors behind this the
director actually of the world value survey if somebody could run it in your
heart who’s probably the most famous kind of political values researcher in
the world and so they took they measured basically values across the world in
different you know really everywhere bet on very onto very simplistic schemes
basically two dimensions they say there is one dimension which is this one here
which distinguishes between so called survival values and same expression
values if you’re low on if you’re somewhere in this corner you are valuing
survival more than something that we call self expression there is now
another exit II the second dimension which has two Poulos and one is
traditional views traditional values where the so-called secular rational
values now you can see that that certain countries and these are then the country
averages of what people are saying in response to this very survey
can be grouped across along these two lines and then we can somehow try to you
know somehow group them by giving them a label you find up here so along the axis
here we find quite many northern European countries so these are
countries who who value self-expression highly and also more secular rational
values on the other end of the spectrum is more you know could say traditional
societies and also those where survivor still plays a role and the theory behind
this is that it really has to do with the economic development so we are kind
of coming back now to what George actually said about our sort of
obsession with measuring something like GDP something like economic growth and
why this is so so important why it’s related to to well-being and and how
this is related to values the argument here is that something has happened in
advanced industrial societies after the Second World War we have so much
Economic Security now and that really led to a transformation of our politics
of our social life and and also then it expressed a new values so it goes to be
together with some kind of hierarchies of need you might have heard about mass
loss kind of pyramid the idea is as soon as you are sort of basic you no need for
food shelter and so on once that’s covered then you kind of can
think about sort of more more abstract higher aims of you know something like
self transcendence transcendence so he distinguishes between material value on
the one hand so that’s really it’s about economic growth things you need to
survive people who live in these kind of situations countries who face you know
high economic insecurity they will usually express these more material
values and politically this then goes together with some kind of what they
call sort of authoritarian reaction so these are then countries which really
value strong law and order policy is clearly very strong
protective economic policies you know basically everything that sort of makes
them make you know make sure that that survival will be will be secured and and
in general they will express more traditional values also when it comes to
you know family life things like you know your attitudes towards abortion
divorce homosexuality and so on very conservative whereas once sort of the
the basic things such as food shelter and so on once that’s covered and and
the argument really is that post-world war two many countries in in Western
Europe for example these countries here they now really take Economic Security
for granted and that leads to this transformation of various towards more
post materialist based so the idea of caring for the environment valuing human
rights and so on so really going beyond your own personal needs and this very
fundamental needs but actually from some much more societal values much more
abstract values in a way and so this has been criticized because you could say
well this is very much Western bias and perhaps we could also say that there is
a certain assumption that you know the more economic development you know the
more progressive our values will become but I’ll come back to that whether
that’s really the case in the meantime just again to get you bit thinking and
getting again just to show you some examples how values are also expressed
at country level and you will have probably all heard about the kind of
ideas of the French Revolution and this is still these are still the three key
values that France really puts up you know on it’s like more or less so
liberty equality and and solidarity also in Scotland and we saw and we saw a
wonderful picture of the national performance framework which I could have
just replicated here which George has shown so if you think again of this
flower of the national performance framework there was a purpose and then
there was a value and the values of Scotland according to the National
performance framework are things like dignity kindness compassion rule of law
and some of these terms have also been replicated when it comes to the kind of
principles that guide Social Security Scotland so this is now something that
is devolved to the Scottish level away from Westminster and I think you heard
something about that at your last weekend so Social Security is now a
Scottish responsibility and they repeat these sort of three phrases like the
whole time dignity fairness respect now that tells you a little bit again about
where where might this come from and this kind of comes from probably a
strong desire to be different to you know from it another system which might
not play so much dignity and fairness actually on benefit claimants for
example so these are now the guiding principles in Scotland of of how Social
Security’s organised and you can then think about what does this mean for you
know how policies are designed how benefit claimants and so on are treated another example human dignity shall be
inviolable to respect and protect it shall be the duty of all state authority
what do you think which country has this actually as its first article in its
constitution you were very good with your coca-cola and IKEA and corporations it’s not the UK no the UK definitely the
Constitution’s Germany yes so again it tells you quite
a lot you know why do you need to emphasize dignity who put it as your
first article in your constitution this of course has to do with the history so
they should see the Constitution of 1949 so this is an thing that that can’t be
changed there are other articles in the Constitution which you could change
overrule with a 2/3 majority but this one is is the principle of on which the
German Federal Republic is based another one which can’t be changed and that is
sort of enough 20 which is quite interesting just to give you another you
know it’s a totally different flavor so the Federal Republic of Germany is a
democratic and social federal-state Sony democracy
again we we get I think social state in in German in the German context means
it’s a welfare state so again this is an article which you can’t change so you
can’t abolish the welfare state in Germany and unless there’s a proper
revolutionary overthrow and you get rid of the whole Constitution and then the
federal element of it again has something to do with German
particularities so that it’s just one one example how you could express values
and make them really kind of up front and you know you’re all you’re doing
basically and I think this one you know which country this is that’s the United
States and yeah and that is an interesting one so Liberty is in here as
well if you think about France Frances Liberty but it also has equality and
fraternity if you think of certain policies now again in the US you know
things around gun control and so on if you only have Liberty or not only but
you know if you played Liberty give it such a very dominant status again this
is something that will translate into the way how people behave how policies
are designed what’s possible what’s not this one is an interesting one and and
follows on from again what George has said about gross domestic product
an alternative concept is gross national income so there is a country which now
plays with these terms and says well we are striving for gross national
happiness do you know which country this is it’s Bhutan it’s a British kingdom of
Bhutan and yeah deliberately playing with the kind of obsession again with
GDP kind of saying we want to do differently don’t please don’t mix it up
that doesn’t mean that Bhutan is the happiest country in the world it isn’t
the happiest countries in the world are again the Nordic countries Denmark
Sweden Finland and so on if you believe kind of worldwide happiness surveys but
they they are striving for this happiness is sort of again the guiding
model of a country now to come back to Englehart some cultural
values map and and sort of how political values are shaped by this this is a is a
schema diagram which basically helps us to place political parties again in
different countries along a kind of to two-way spectrum here so the argument is
here on the one hand we can distinguish between classical economic left and
economic rights we can look at things like you know how how much emphasis is
put on on nationalization economic redistribution the welfare state on the
one hand that’s the left and and then the right would much more favored small
State deregulation and so on and very much individual principles now the
argument is in order to really make sense of our party systems these days
that’s not enough left and right is too simple we also need a kind of cultural
axis here and there he decides and not doesn’t decide so argues basically that
on the one end of the pool our spectrum is something called populism which very
much goes together with more traditional values and then on the other hand we
have cosmopolitan liberalism which goes together with more progressive values as
I said more probably post materials values such as being fine with you know
tolerance for foreigners tolerance of abortion and these kind of things and the finding is that in recent years
where although our GDP is still high but economic insecurity has really grown a
lot and especially economic inequality has grown a lot it’s not this sort of
you know one way kind of trend towards more progressive values and and more
democracy and everything but actually there is now a backlash and and if we
have economic insecurity then that will give rise to populist parties so one
explanation why we see this sort of social populism might well be that the
sort of security element is it’s sort of under threat these days and
yeah I think that that might give you quite a lot to think about as well in
these days and I want to finish with a final thought and these are just really
just words made up by me don’t put too much thought into it and making a link
again to what George has said about happiness and well-being so if we are
following our lives according to our own values we should get if we should get
the kind of sense and feeling of well-being if we are not doing this
let’s say if we are if we’re really valuing let’s say honesty but we are
lying and cheating that will cause something that
psychologists call cognitive dissonance we don’t like this it was making feeling
now we could think about some of all of our politicians and even the fact how
often they lie maybe they are just not valuing honesty so it’s not a problem
for them now if we kind of translate this to to the national level again to
the country level there is something you need to learn if we have very clear
values and principles we want to follow as a country then we know what kind of
policies we need and if we follow these policies if these policies are in line
with our values then that children increased we’re being of a country and
yeah I finished with this and sorry for the mix-up with a with the microphones
and I’m very much looking forward to going around and answer any questions thank you very much for that okay
I’m just finding a way to come to the front if you just give me a moment it
takes a while to weave yeah thank you very much for that and so I just wanted
to say before we go into discussions at our tables and just like George came
around Elka will be available around to come around to is that after we do this
short discussion we’re going to be moving on to the really substantive
tasks of the weekend which is creating statements on the kind of country we’re
seeking to build now this is a really important moment for the process of the
assembly because this is where you really start putting into your own words
the kind of Scotland that we’re seeking to build and where we start exploring
the breadth of no diversity of views within the room so there will be a task
that comes after this short discussion but the reason that we’ve had some of
the presentations that we’ve had today is that they’ve all been building up to
what we’re going to be doing next that substantive task that I’m talking about
and through the discussions that we’ve had over the course the morning and the
the short one we’re about to have now what we’ve been trying to do I hope is
to enrich the information for you for when you turn to do that task and you
turn your mind to the kind of Scotland that we’re seeking to build so you might
want to make connections with other information or discussions that have
come over the course of today when you’re just taking a moment here to
reflect on values but yeah Elka will be available to come around the room please
stick up the card in the air if you’d like Elka to join your table but I’d ask
you to now turn in and have a discussion and a reflection on what you’ve just
heard thank you right thank you everyone I hope you found that an interesting
discussion as well and as I mentioned before we started it all these
discussions we’ve been having today have been building up to what we’re about to
do now so what we’re doing now is we’re moving on to the first big main task of
this weekend which is creating statements about what kind of country we
are seeking to build and this is the start of a process that will take us
through two Morrow and that’s really gonna set the
course for future weekends so as you know we are trying to find some common
ground through everything we’re doing in this assembly but to do that we need to
start by understanding the views of everyone in the room and there are
nearly a hundred and twenty of you in this room bringing all your different
knowledge experience values and we need some kind of process to be able to share
all of that but get to a point where we are identifying the common grounds that
we have so the process that we’re going to go through today and tomorrow is
designed to take as broad a picture as possible of the views in the room then
to narrow them down but slowly through a series of steps and through very
importantly a process of deliberation until we have a group of statements that
we can collectively say so collectively as a room say reflect the Assemblies of
common ground so this isn’t something that we’re going to do quickly it will
go through seven different rounds that will take place over several sessions
both for the rest of today and also into tomorrow and I’ll explain
as thoroughly as I can what we’re going to do at every stage but your table
facilitators can also guide you along the way so they’re very much there to
guide you too the first task is to get that broad picture of opinions in the
room and as I’ve mentioned everyone here there’s lots of us but what this room is
designed to be is what we call a mini public and that’s essentially a
representation of Scotland to some extent so naturally you will have a
range of views on the sort of Scotland you want to see and we absolutely do
expect that so what this exercise is designed to do is to let you express
yourself as an individual on what you think is most important the Scotland you
want to build is but that’s just the first step so expressing yourself as an
individual by the end of tomorrow you will have
collectively after going through the steps which will be taking you through
Stony slowly and have created that vision that captures the breadth and
diversity of the views in this room and finds the common ground that you share
and we know that it’s sometimes quite hard to say what you really think
especially when you’re with a group of people that perhaps you don’t know so
well so the exercise that we’re about to go into now is really designed to allow
you to express your views freely so that we get an accurate picture of what
people in the room are thinking without kind of forcing you to have to say out
loud and share it immediately when perhaps you may still be kind of waiting
for the right time to say something and you know you don’t feel like you want to
say it’s your table just yet but in this process you’ll be able to say it so
here’s how it works on your tables in front of you there are some slips of
paper with the table facilitators mind just pointing them out to the people in
there in their tables just now they’re there because we would like you to write
some short sentences about the kind of Scotland that you want to build and I’ll
come back to exactly what kind of sentences we’re looking for just in a
moment then on your tables we have envelopes that are marked with a letter
and that’s so the facilitation team know which table
all of your different statements have come from other participants won’t
necessarily know that but will be able to track your ideas and how they flowed
through the process for that openness and your ideas will also not be shared
within your own table so we’re not expecting you to read out the statements
that you’re writing but they’ll be shared with another table to go through
so I hope that part is clear so white asked you to do right now as part of
this task is to start thinking about the Scotland you would like to build and to
come up with up to three short statements about what you would like it
to be and those statements you don’t need to capture this when you’re
recording your state so you don’t have to put this on your
slip but bear in mind that all of your statements will all be starting with the
sentence here that says the Scotland we are seeking to build will so you’re
filling in the gap after where it says will but we’re starting your statements
with the Scotland we are seeking to build will there are a few guidelines
around this that we’d like you to bear in mind we want you to focus on Scotland
as a whole and not on a particular place we want you to focus on broad goals and
not individual services and we want you to focus on the positive so we’re
looking at what sort of Scotland you want to build what you want for the
future and not the negatives and in your statement so as I mentioned you can have
up to three each it’d be great if you could ensure that you only have one kind
of substantial point in there because you’ll see as we move through the
process that if you put too many points in one statement things will get a lot
trickier so please keep to one substantial point in each of those
statements so please do take a moment to speak to your neighbor if you would like
and then we’d like you to individually and that supporting the table of needed
and to come up to three statements that set out one thing about the kind of
Scotland you want to build so as I said please ensure that you write one idea on
each slips so that really really helps us move through the process and helps us
with sorting later on and you have around 12 to 15 minutes to do this and
then I’ll let you know what we’re doing next see you soon hi so we just had a question which I’d
like to answer in the open so some people wondering they were meant to
write one word we’re not looking for you to write one word it’s just one thing
one key thing per statement and a statement you would expect maybe a
sentence so we purposefully haven’t given you an example because we don’t
want to lead what you want to lead what you’re right but you could imagine that
the Scotland we are seeking to build will do something so yeah we’re looking
for a sense it’s not necessarily a word and this that’s really what you mean to
do and so that yeah so elaborate maybe a little bit we have a couple of more
minutes so please do take your time just to complete your statements and when
everyone is happy they’re complete statements on a table please put them in
the envelopes and table facilitators put it in the air so that Anthony and Holly
can collect them up and will tell you what happens next okay everybody thank you so much for
doing that that was I would step one really so good stuff just gonna briefly
tell you what will happen in the next step so the next stage is for each table
to receive another groups set of statements so bear in mind
everyone creating their statements was doing that from your own perspective as
an individual but there are bound to be potentially some duplicated statements
or some statements that are very very similar so what we’re going to do is
we’re going to go through all those statements in the envelopes that came
out of each table so that envelopes that you’ve just received and as we read
through them it’d be great if you start thinking about which one’s actually
maybe they’re quite similar and if you see something you think they are they
are the same thing your table facilitator will take you through a
process and you’re just cluster them and clustering means that you just take
think statements that say the same thing and kind of bundle them together but not
everything will be a cluster there’ll be a lot of statements I’m sure that stand
on their own and they will be kept as statements in their own right what
you’re going to be asked to do by the end of this process and we do have quite
a bit of time to get through this bit is that you’re going to be asked to choose
ten of the statements in that envelope and bear in mind that you’ll certainly
have more than ten when you open that envelope to begin with and the ten
statements you’re be selecting are not just statements you agree with it’s not
about selecting statements that you agree with at this stage but we will get
to that but it’s about ones that you think represent the range of diversity
of views of the statements in front of you so when you’re looking at those
statements and bearing in mind this process we’re going through is about
common ground what we want you to be thinking about the forefront of your
mind is which of these statements in front of me represent the breadth and
diversity of views and you’ll be able to select the ones that you kind of agree
with later in the process but that’s coming so what we’re looking for now is
statements that represent a breadth and diversity of views so I’ll take you hand
you back now to your table for sale tatta they will take you through this
process and then after that will tell you what happens next thank you hey everyone the last table has sealed
and handed in their envelopes I believe can I just check is anyone just sorting
out their envelope are they all handed in amazing honesty it’s amazing it that
was incredible to watch you do that and you got through it in a really good time
I have to say I’m just gonna let you happy
let you know what’s happening next and then we’ll be moving into a break so
what’s happening now you may note your envelope has travelled across the room
to this table over here and basically what’s happening at that table is a
process of clustering what’s come up across the room so what you just did on
your table essentially that is now happening over there but across the room
so as you can imagine there’s quite a few statements however they will all be
coming back to you absolutely nothing is being removed from the process those
clusters will be coming back to you after the break and what we’re basically
just doing is another process of refinement of those clusters that come
up across the room and we’re just filtering down basically and the reason
we’re doing that is because we’re trying to get to a manageable set of statements
for the process that will be going through tomorrow so everything over
there is going to be coming back to the members and you’ll just be doing some
further refinement and the statements that you’ve put over there are
statements that you have thought reflect the breadth and diversity of views
across the Assembly of the kind of country that we’re trying to build and
during that process you’ve probably noticed that you may have set aside some
statements I just want to let you know those statements that weren’t put in
that envelope and have been taken to that table
they are statements that will still be captured in the event report so what you
wrote in there that will still be captured and people will know that that
came out of the room but it won’t be continuing through this process and we
are going to move into a break now but you might want to go and watch this
process and the reason we’re doing it in this room is that you could say that you
can do that if you want to watch how this clustering is playing
you can do that but I just want to emphasize that everything you put in
your envelope is absolutely coming back here after the break so is that a good
point to have a break I suppose I think you really deserve it fantastic we’ll be
back here at 20 past 4:20 past 4:00 and please you’re very welcome to go and
watch the clustering as it happens one – just one – shiny new Mike good stuff can
you all hear me now right and so thank you so much for what you did before the
break as I said I think you caught through that tasks fantastically well
and what we’re gonna do next I’m just gonna briefly explained so you may have
seen the break and it was great that some of you came to watch a little bit
of the process is what we’ve done is we take took all those clusters and those
statements that you put in that envelope we took them to that table and what
we’ve done now is we’ve clustered across the room so we’ve kind of reduced a
little bit by clustering in that process the piles of cards where there was a
pile that you had and you put that summary statement on top that you felt
captured everything in that pile we’ll bring back the summary card to use the
summary card comes back in but we have actually kept a record of all the cards
that you put in that cluster to produce that summary cards so that we can report
on that – so you can see how your ideas have flowed so what you’ve produced is
now coming back to the tables in the room cluster and you’re going through
that process again of looking at that cluster and seeing if you agree first of
all I think it’s very important that you agree that that is a cluster and then
producing a single statement that you feel summarizes that cluster you have
the power if actually as you’re looking through that cluster looking at the
single statements and you think actually I’m not quite
sure that should be in this class I actually think that might be a different
point you have the power to remove it from the cluster and to treat it again
as that single statement and I think that’s quite important that you are able
to do that so again your table facilitators will guide you through the
process you’ll be able to put up the the card if you want anyone to come around
and explain the process again and you’ll be getting essentially to the end of
this exercise with another further refined list of statements so
essentially what we’re doing here is we’re just finalizing statements on the
kind of country that we’re seeking to build and just kind of reviewing what
we’ve generated over the course of the afternoon and then all of those refined
statements are going to come back tomorrow to continue the process to
continue setting the priorities for discussion at future weekends they’ll be
coming from your statements so that’s what we’ll be doing but of course I’ll
explain more when we get through these steps so you know what’s going on and
what’s gonna happen so clusters will be coming around to your tables imminently
Kayla is somewhere over there just preparing the customers to bring rounds
so yeah if we just get going and then we’ll reconvene in a short little while
happy clustering refining I should say refining or clustering okay hey can I
bring the room black together please brilliant thank you so much for doing
that I was wandering around the tables and kind of watching and it was
incredible to see the process that you went through I’m quite impressed by how
all the timing what she did it actually you never know how long these things are
going to take but what we have now essentially between us is an unordered
so we haven’t ranked them we haven’t done anything like that but what we have
is an unordered but refined list of statements that reflect the breadth and
diversity of views in the room about the Scotland we’re seeking to
build and tomorrow we’re gonna start from that list that we’ve ended up with
today so that list as I mentioned earlier will be coming back to the room
for the next step in the process but I just wanted to take a little bit of time
to reflect on your work today and that was no easy task that you have just been
through but you’ve done it and you seem to have done it quite successfully and I
think we’ve come some way today to showing what some of the common ground
is across the assembly and thinking about the kind of Scotland that we’re
trying to build so what we’re gonna do now because I think it’s nice that we
hear some feedback from tables we hear some of the things that have come up
across the room is that myself and Kaler again I’m here in the back hello Kayla
and we’re just going to go around tables for the next probably 15 minutes or so
and what we’re going to do is we’re going to ask you to read out a couple of
the statements that you have so that’s just to read out two of the statements
that you have from your table if people want to volunteer to share a statement I
heartily encourage you to do so but we go to each table and just take two and
that’s just so you hear what’s come out of today you won’t hear everything but
everything will be reflected in that list that comes back to you tomorrow to
move through the process so I’m gonna start over here Kayla if that’s all
right with you coming to you okay and this was really everyone hello
hello this is the feedback from Table four and so we had a good discussion
about the clusters and two of the statements we have the first one is
invest in and provide a thriving and fit for purpose health service so that was
our first statement and then another statement was to provide housing for
everyone yeah celebratory moment and so this was a
famous statement from table 14 sorry from table 14 and this was in the
Scotland Scotland Scotland we were seeking to build well encourage and
support all citizens to reach their full potential throughout their lives that
was our main one the second point I guess if we wanted to choose one was
about having a more accessible public transport to everyone over the full
country or the whole country okay at this table we had firstly that Scotland
will include the diversity of its citizens in making policy and the second
one is that Scotland will be the envy of the world
in other words it’ll be your brilliant okay I’m gonna hand over to Michael here
from table 13 to read a couple of theirs thank you the scotland we are seeking to
build will have equal opportunities for all as we sorted that i we realized
there was a deference everybody in the group had said there were equal
opportunities some choose to add activity which is about how they were
going to do that so we’ve kind of separated away a bit and the other thing
we had was a scotland we’re seeking to build well be breaks it free
thank you and remembering these are not ones we all agree with but they’re ones
that come across as the range and her second one is the scotland we are
seeking to build will welcome nurture and support freedom self determination
was independence it was taken on independence hello table 12
was to provide a free world-class education for all and to have a country
of high moral values okay Table three we have here the
Scotland we are seeking to build will deliver on its promises with integrity
and the contras collet we are seeking to build will be a safe country at table 11
the Scotland we are seeking to build will be free of poverty and the Scotland
we are seeking to build will have a football team that can reach the Weddell
Cullen’s gonna take us a minute to get back to this room isn’t it aye at Table
seven we chose the Scotland we are seeking to
build will be a thriving nation and will be safe for all who live here and our
second of three was that the Scotland we are seeking to build will have
appropriate income for everyone okay so wherever here at Table ten now the one
we’ve got here it says the Scotland’s we are seeking to build is a sustainable
society where we balance our environmental economic and social impact
for the good of the country and citizens and the next one is the Scotland’s we
are seeking to build will nationalize key industries and services such as real
energy and broadband and run them for the benefit of our people and not for
profit say okay the Scotland we’re seeking to
build will be critical of its nationalism and the Scotland we are
seeking to build will be a prosperous and financially secure country so I’ve
got feedback from Table five so for the first statement is the Scotland we are
seeking to build will be respect respectful welcoming and inclusive the
next one is Scotland we are speaking to us as seeking to build will be a place
where citizens take personal responsibility about their community and
environment okay I’m gonna hand over to Jamie from table 9 to read a couple of
there’s the Scotland we are seeking to build will be a society the stage for
equality regardless of race Roger financial security also the Scot we are
seeking to vote will be a fear of progressive country the Scotland we are
seeking to build will be at least three degrees warmer the affair and social
just society for all the Scotland we are seeking to build being socially
responsible by taking care of the most vulnerable in society to alleviate
poverty walking towards a dedication well I think that’s that’s everyone just
to check that that was every table right excellent good stuff okay that’s pretty
much our day so yeah so I just wanted to tell you what happens next before I hand
over to Kate for some reflections so what’s going to happen is we’re gonna
take these statements that you now have on your table which you’ve gone through
a process to refine and we are going to not remove them from the process we’re
going to type them up and bring those final refined statements back into the
room tomorrow and we’re going to basically move through a process where
you’ll be discussing things like your priorities and priorities for basically
the future weekends and what we’re gonna discuss so really from tomorrow you’re
kind of deciding where this assembly is going and that decision is in your hands
and it’s based on the work that you’ve done today so I hope that’s quite
exciting and I’m very excited to see what comes out of tomorrow but we’re
explained a couple of steps that we go through just over the remainder of the
weekend when we come back tomorrow morning with that list and you’ll be
able to have a little bit of time to review that list on your tables and to
have some more discussion of course I think that discussion is very important
so I think it’s over to you yeah brilliant thank you I think now for the first time I can
truly say the citizens Assembly of Scotland you have forged yourselves
across the last couple of hours through a tremendous amount of work you’ve
trusted each other you’ve listened to each other and I think now we can see
how we move forward together so please sincerely give yourselves a tremendous
round of applause because I’m amazed I’m amazed but I’m not surprised so that is
good the Sun rose this morning the Sun has set I made a mistake with moss this
morning saying that we were going to be discussing for a week I think at points
in the day it felt like that actually was happening but I think you have
covered so much ground that I hope each individual member and collectively you
feel that the process has been worth it the ideas have flowed and as we’ve
stated at the very beginning we may not agree about everything that has been put
forward but we can sign up to the process and I think I hope I truly
believe that you have signed up to that process and that you trust that process
so this morning if you cast your mind way back then we were looking at
happiness what makes for a good life and for a good country we were looking at
values and how they ship the country we are and the country will we want to be
and we’ve captured all of that and that everything that we have done today all
that a tremendous amount of work will be captured and put into the report of the
weekend the flip charts the notes what makes a good life what makes a quality
of life values how they shape the country ha and the country we want to be
all that will be gathered but it feels now that we have aged almost to the
point of our first aim what kind of country do we want to have you’ve had
your wide range of individual statements they’ve come together and you’ve shipped
a vision that you can agree broadly captures the breadth and diversity of
use across the assembly of Scotland and this really is an important moment
remember this is Scotland’s first-ever citizens assembly and it is the first
ever vision of the breadth and diversity of your views created directly by
citizens in this way not only have we been working together all afternoon we
have been at the very cutting edge of democratic innovation so thank you a
hundred times over it’s exhausting it’s tiring but all of this learning is being
captured and all of the information that we’ve gathered up will be published on
the website so that other countries other people other nations will see what
we are doing and also I just wanted to remind you at this point
that on the website the names your names and your regions as Assembly members
will be published over this weekend as well and I hope that M that you will
feel incredibly proud to be connected to this process so tomorrow morning you’ll
have time to review and discussions discuss the vision before moving on to
an even more challenging task which is narrowing down that narrowing that down
to a vision M that you all share the common ground between you and your
fellow citizen and then we want to then refine that further to come to the
conclusion about the areas that we want to explore in greeter at greater detail
across the coming weekends you know setting our vision is one thing but then
working how we affect change to address that vision is the next step so well
done it’s been incredibly hard work but you’ll be very pleased to hear we are
now finishing for the evening we’ve finished a little bit early thank you
please go and relax enjoy yourselves and we’ll try and deal with some of the
little glitchy things that may be made the day slightly more difficult but
relax reflect enjoy enjoy your dinner and then we’ll all come back into the
room tomorrow morning refreshed thank you so much

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *