Citizens Assembly 2 Glasgow Nov – Friday Night

Citizens Assembly 2 Glasgow Nov – Friday Night


good evening and a very warm welcome to
the Golden Jubilee conference hotel I’m pleased to tell you that this hotel is
part of the NHS and as such any of the profits that are made through the
conference center and our being here are put back into this facility so I think
it’s a very fitting venue for us and it’s also the site of Scotland’s
shipbuilding and engineering companies M William Beardmore sank
or should I say invested probably a better word for that invested about a
hundred million Pines in today’s money into the naval construction works on
this site as the yard was called when it opened in 1906 now by the time it closed
25 years later in 1931 the yard had produced a hundred and seven ships 393
locomotives and an amazing 539 aircraft and many of the tenements in the area
around here were built by a beard more for the yards workers and if you’re
interested the meeting rooms are all named after some of the famous vessels
built here and on their short biographies on the plaques attached to
each room so if you’re interested in finding out a little bit more about the
history and have a look at the plaques so I think it is extremely fitting in
this site of industry in this site of well-being and public service that we
are meeting once again as the first citizens Assembly of Scotland now in the
room the most important people in the room of course
are you the Assembly members and I am absolutely delighted it is heartwarming
to see so many of you gathering together at this time of year when I know you
have lots of other pressures and lots of other commitments I think it shows a
trust and connection that is building up amongst yourselves it shows a trust with
the Secretariat and with the wider and assembly team but most importantly for
me it shows the trust and commitment that you have
as assembly members to this process and I am heart warmed and I feel you should
really even at the beginning of the weekend give yourselves a round of
applause for that so it’s great to see so many faces back again and we’ll get
to know each other and Trust will build again across the weekend
now unfortunately my co convener David Martin is unable to be with us this
evening but he will be joining us at the weekend so I am going to be steering the
ship for this evening and I just wanted to reiterate um that David and I were
appointed to make sure that the Assembly delivers on its remit to make sure that
it has the resources needed to allow you to diligently carry out your work and
also that it is run to the highest standards of public administration and
that the resources we have in hand are used to best effect David and myself are
taking this rule incredibly seriously I’m on your behalf and on behalf of the
secretary art and we’re approaching it with seven key principles the assembly
is independent it is transparent its inclusive its accessible it’s balanced
in this approach we are working through a process of cumulative learning and
that we are open minded and I sincerely hope that if you have any comments of
those four seven principles that you share it with the Secretariat or with
ourselves because I cannot stress strongly enough how important and it is
that we see through every action the assembly takes with those seven key
principles in mind this evening um I’d like you to get to know each
other a little bit more and enjoy the evening but I’d also like to introduce
Kelly McBride who will be where’s Kelly Kelly there Kelly is going to be our
lead facilitator this weekend and at all future weekends and we’re also joined
this evening by Antony who you will remember well from our last weekend and
Antony and Kelly will be able assisted by the facilitators in the room who
wearing their bright blue t-shirts this time around the post didn’t laugh Stein
that’s good and I’d also like to reintroduce you to Ian Davidson who’s
sitting right at the back of the room Ian Davidson is the secretary for the
secretary for the Assembly and he is able assisted by the Secretariat who you
love map again on your way in on behalf of from David and myself we would like
to give a very sincere vote of thanks to Ian and the secretary out I think you
will be aware of the volume of work that they have carried out hosting us safely
from first weekend to the second weekend and I know it’s been a huge amount of
work and I think you have done it with grace and commitment so thank you very
much for that um I’d also like to introduce Phil Allen
and Kayla Scott who will be presenting this evening kayla is here and Phil is
here M and also stewarding group members Doreen Grove Allen Rennick is hiding at
the back don’t read anything into that and Alice kinghorn gray Alice she’s not
here yet okay they’ll be joining us across the weekend you’ll see that we
also have the sound and video crew with us again this weekend and we are filming
all the presentations but for this particular weekend we don’t have any
prayers joining us and we’re not live-streaming the events like we did
last time you may be aware that out with this room there is a general election
going on you might have heard so David and I and the Secretariat spoke about
this at length and it became apparent to us that we value the work of the
Assembly with such high importance that we had to make sure that it was kept
completely independent from the general election we think your work in this room
at this moment in time is more important than the general election and we didn’t
want that other event to be to be pulling you off and off course but what
we will be doing is keeping all the films that we’re taking
this weekend and putting them up on the website so the wider public can see what
we’ve been discussing and working on after the 12th of December and I’d like
to just confirm at this point that everybody who has asked not to be
photographed or film and we will be adhering to that request so I’m the only
thing between you and your dinner so I will not stay here long but just to give
you a little bit of housekeeping and the hotel reception is back in the atrium if
you have any issues with the hotel rooms or the general hotel work please and
speak with them and the assembly secretary at have a desk outside where
you picked up your barges and your packs and they’ll be available until the end
of the dinner and a slight apology if anybody had a delay in the expenses
being paid out last time and it was slightly more work than we anticipated
to get everybody paid first time around but neither the process is set up it
should be much quicker and a much more streamlined and process but to assist us
with that if you could make sure that you give your forms to the secretary out
that you sign them and that you’ve checked your bank details and that
you’ve handed in any receipts you will have received an email from us about the
agenda for the weekend I hope you’ve had a chance to look at that if not please
do have a glance over it before the weekend and you’ll know from that that
tonight we’re having a learning didn’t I’ll be telling a little bit more about
Phil and Kayla later on who will be presenting and some evidential pieces
for us so very briefly the running order for this evening is enjoy your starters
and your means at about quarter past 8:00 we’ll have the presentations and
then we’ll be able to metaphorically and physically digest those while we have
our dessert and coffee and we’ll be finishing at nine o’clock so sincerely
thank you so much for joining us I think we’ve got a phenomenal weekend ahead of
us and and I’m very much looking forward to working with you across this weekend
thank you okay so we’ve had some food and now we’re going to have some food
for thought it’s going to tease up into thinking
about the evidence that we’re going to hear over the weekend and
some ideas to kind of chew over and discuss over our pudding and throughout
the rest of the evening and we’re joined whether our first speaker is Phil Allen
Phil is going to talk to us about trusted sources a brief guide to the
press and modern media now Phil is the Account Director with 3×1 who are the
public relations company who provide Public Relation services for the
assembly here and but he also formerly worked as the editor of the Angus County
press and as a journalist on the press and journal so Phil has a huge amount of
experience and information to impart with us and I think maybe slightly
provocative as we move through the through the talk
thank you I’m glad that most of you enjoyed your meal I certainly didn’t cuz
I’m gonna have to speak to you now so forgive me I’ve got 15 minutes so I’m
not going to mess about with much preamble
so as Kate Kate said 20 years experience in news newspapers a little bit of
broadcasting and then moved over to what journalists call the dark side which is
PR so I’ve got experience in the media from both sides of the fence if you like
so with no more ado I’m going to fire through these slides which I hope are
there we go thank God for that okay so I’m going to start just with a quick
show of hands how many people still buy a newspaper on a regular basis so in a
room of 100 for 20 25 maybe okay how many people still read a newspaper
online or rescued okay so that’s much more how many people still see the
newspapers as a trusted source of information illuminating illuminating okay so this
slide is called the part of the press and just a little bit of a history
lesson how many people and this will be depending on your age how many people
recognized or remember those headlines yeah so we can see that you know news is
often described as the first draft of history so it’s the first time you get
take on what’s happening so these were all massively historical cultural events
and these papers well those thirty years ago for the Sun
gotcha twenty odd years ago for Diana 1560
seventeen years 18 years ago since the twin towers small event happened a
couple years ago I think there and Obama as well so very very much part of the
culture and massively massively influential and what I’m just trying to
do is just for you guys tonight just get a little bit thought about where your
news cold from and the prism through which the newspapers and television
actually present that news to you because everybody’s got an influence
everybody’s gotten a prejudice and they tend to get that from the media so we
looked at the power of the press and just a couple of things of what did you
they are powerful but if I told you that in the last 15 years in Britain alone
there is 260 newspapers have closed 260 newspapers that used to employ
journalists shut finished over so where are people getting their news now how
can you tell that you know there there is a there is a you know your events in
your local communities are being reported on in a reliable way
it’s actually very very difficult newspapers are you know circulation has
plummeted over those periods of times millions of last
paper sold as this room demonstrates compared to what there was a few years
back so it’s a challenging time but the influence that newspapers exert it’s
still considerable so we’re not dead yet but they’re faced with considerable
challenges from television and certainly from the internet so the other main
source of news obviously is television and some stats here which I hope you can
read in these slides this is from a recent report from Ofcom just in terms
of saying that TV still remains the most trusted and most watched forum of news
but the fact that social media has actually increased as well and that is
also an age group difference here most all their people still view the TV as as
as their most trusted and reliable source of news whereas younger people
tend to gravitate more to social media and the Internet is news bait certainly
from 16 to 24 and also from different backgrounds as well so TV is influential
but it also takes a lot of of its its agenda from what what happens in the
press so TV is 24/7 its ruling news that’s become a real thing over the last
few years as well but it’s often led by a press agenda so if you watch Andrew
Barr for example on a Sunday morning who are the first gasps he has on the
morning journalists from the Sunday papers what the stories that they are
talking about on a given Sunday it’s what’s happening in the the Sunday
papers so that this sort of symbiotic relationship between press and TV still
exists and whatever whatever the the news agenda is it’s it’s you know
dictated by the press but also by events but that interpretation is always there
and more and more we’re trying to attract see that you know the the the
influences of the people who that are on these programs is actually quite you
know you need to be aware of it you know you need to be aware that if people
journalists are on question time for example they are there perhaps with an
agenda representing the publications that that they work for so it’s just
always to try to have an in to remember that what you’re being told is always
through a specific prism and you know you need to be aware of that and if
you’re not you know just try to get a little bit more understanding about it
it’s always a good thing so TV has now used to be what channels
one BBC Beauty to ITV then channel four came along in the UK and the
subsequently Channel five nowadays we’ve got you know dozens of channels and
dozens and news channels that we that we have as well so you can see there you
know just through your own television you can see what’s happening in the
States are from an American point of view with CNN you can watch Russia today
and then you’ve got Fox News or MSNBC so you know there’s loads of different
places where you can actually see a different interpretation of a specific
story and assembly watch these new stations that is either these are pretty
unfamiliar to you people watch try to get their news from different areas know
yeah a few of you yeah and just it’s not quit but you know what you what you’ll
see is that that they will have a different take on a story so you know if
you want to try and get balance you know do you watch both both Russia Today and
CNN or you know what I’m trying to say is read or watch as many different
sources as you can and try to come up with a balanced view so all of that
really has been completely exploded by social media so you know where once you
know you could you could you know you could define yourself by which newspaper
you’re you know you know you know you were a
times man or you know you were you were a woman who read the Daily Mail and that
can it defined you know how you how you actually lived your life and your
worldview was governed by that but in the social media age that’s been
completely exploded so you can get so much news and so many different
different areas that that people can can actually pick up information from so you
know you you know people asked well what happened last week is good what just
google it you know just gonna have a look on it on the internet and see what
you see what you can find on there so I just I was just looking for some stats
that we’d actually can I explain this and you know how the proportion of news
of social media it’s actually gone through the roof really so do so we
talked about some people who didn’t use mirrors
how many people get their news from Facebook reasonable amount Twitter
people of regular using Twitter users it’s quite a lot that’s quite
interesting and then to a lesser extent Instagram and snapchat which are a
little bit lower but if you’re getting your news from that all right what are
you actually what are you actually getting in it is the boy himself
so Trump has coined the phrase feat news but I don’t think I don’t think it’s
disputed whether it actually existed before he did or not but certainly
become people have become more aware of this as I have become at that 5-minute
saying over there I’m gonna have to wrap up really quickly but you know what what
we’re looking at is that feat news isn’t new you know it used to be called
propaganda it used to be called spin and now feat news is possibly you know just
a different interpretation of what it’s all about so I mean who can you trust
everybody recognize who’s there yeah the guy with the armband Joseph Goebbels
then we’ve got communist propaganda down there and then we’ve got Zucco Berg
they’re from Facebook and just a couple of other
guy from Cambridge Allen analytic as well so who can you trust
and what what I actually want to do is just give you a couple of tips about how
you can actually tackle fate news or do I understand you know what what’s
actually going to be you know means of trying to trying to protect yourself
from from people who are out to kid you so probably the most important thing is
to read critically you know and always question the information that you’re
receiving and you know does it does it kind of accord with you don’t prejudices
or doesn’t actually you know challenge you think about issues in a different
way and you know if you’re gonna look I speak to a couple of the guys down at
the table there so if you only ever read one source of news you’re possibly going
to be influenced in a way that yeah probably not even aware of you know if
you read the daily meal you know you’re going to have a certain worldview if you
read The Guardian you’re gonna have a separate world that’s a different
worldview but what’s really interesting is try to understand both worldviews
because what you might find there’s a middle path there but never actually
take take it at face value and it’s becoming a much much more challenging
thing for people to try understand and interpret when there’s so many
information sources nowadays it’s genuinely literally mind-boggling so
that’s all well and good to talk about trusted sources but what happens when
the sources that you believe are should be trusted like the government they
start becoming questionable in terms of how they actually are promoting things
just a couple of very very quick ones there everyone aware of the the fact
check site did it did everywhere aware of that story
whereas the Conservative Party pretended it was a fact-checking site on the day
that the the Labour Party manifesto was launched you know that becomes a real
blurring of you know what misinformation and disinformation you
recognize that that video there with apps when again and I’m not trying to
put pause a political point but the Conservative Party again edited the
video from pierced armor to make it Luke like stormer was a stuttering fool you
know and you may have your own opinions on that but they were certainly try and
manipulate the message there levy you down there again facing false
information fake facts manipulation which is just amplified by social media
so it becomes a real real chance to try to understand where where the truth lies
so I just all I want to do is really just try it if you were feeling
overwhelmed by Europe it’s something that you feel like that you should be
more aware of so these are some of the sites I think that you can help here if
you if you want to check your facts but I suppose the the underlying message
is that you know trust your sources but it’s it’s very very difficult in this
modern age so when you come to something like the citizens assembly where you’ve
got much more deliberative approach and you’ve got an opportunity to sit down
and listen to evidence sit down talk amongst yourselves about like pretty
significant issues that I know you’re going to be dealing with you know this
kind of deliberative democracy is actually really quite a good thing and
I’m not speaking as a PR person for for the citizens assembly but just my
experience of it so far has been very very encouraging so it’s a great
opportunity it is an innovative approach that they that Scotland is undertaking
here and hopefully in the next couple of might you’ll understand what the media
interest and this is I think perhaps we were the next meeting we’ll start seeing
that that international media interest that we’ve been dealing with in the last
few weeks will be evident as people want to come and see what you guys are up to
so I think I’ve got three seconds left or something like that that was a very
very poor kind of explanation about about how the
media works and if you do want to speak to me I’ll be around later on by all
means come and see you hello so I think and that I’m being told that that’s it
I’m done and John enjoy the rest of your evening
thank you very much em Thank You Phil and of course there are copies all
filled slides available on one of the tables outside I think a bit of a
counter through the history of the press there and and I this last presentation
for this evening before you can have your your suite and coffee and kind of
discuss them to be at the things that you’ve heard we have Kayla Scott she is
going to speak with us about how do we ensure we have informed conversations
and Kayla is head of democratic innovation at involve a public
participation charity involved and is an expert advisor to the assembly secretary
out so Kaylee are divorcing on developing theory and practice around
public engagement and new forms of democratic innovation ok so hello so
most of you will have seen me speaking a bit last weekend and see me around so
I’m part of the Secretariat but very much as Kate said work around this idea
of public participation and deliberation as part of my my permanent job so right
what I’m going to talk to you about is a bit building on what Phil’s just talked
about how do we make sure that the conversations we have here within the
citizens assembly are actually informed and are effectively informed so we can
be used confident in the evidence and things that we’re using so if you think
back to Kate’s initial presentation opening statements on our first Saturday
we were together she talked about the fact that we want to do something
different here we wanted to move away from some of the debates that go on in
Scotland and and the rest of the country about about things that are important
and try and have different types of conversations conversations that were
respectful and mature and based on information and deliberation but what
does that really mean and how do we get there we have a tradition within this
country of really using debate debate is the way that a lot of public important
public discussions about issues that are important to us take place from the
Scottish Parliament and they’re debating chamber there the debates that we see on
TV that’s how we see this sort of people trying to make sense of or make the case
for different types of arguments but this idea of debate is a really
particular one the whole word debate literally means to beat down it’s about
winning it’s about people arguing it out and trying to persuade you that their
view is right and the outcome usually leads to this idea of a win lose it’s a
very two-sided way of having a conversation but when we talk about
deliberation we’re talking about something different we’re talking about
that idea of weighing up looking at different options balancing them up and
trying to bark build consensus find out where we have common ground that we can
build upon so that instead of instead of trying to find a win-lose ideally you’re
aiming for a win-win or at least something that actually everyone goes
yeah I can live with that that’s the type of thing it seems to fit and feel
right for me but to get to that point of deliberation and to get to it in a way
that people are actually able to make those trade-offs and recognize where
those differences are actually the foundation is information the foundation
is that learning and in the case of the citizens assembly that taking of
evidence having people come and speak to you to build up your understanding of
different things we use that through discussion so that we make sure we all
understand and we hear what other people’s perspectives are but then take
it to a deliberation where can look at trade-offs and find where
we’ve got common ground so if we’re talking about evidence and evidence at
the citizens assembly and we’re really going to start moving into a lot of this
tomorrow this idea that evidence can come in a
number of forms and as phil has said you know there’s lots of different ways
people are getting information but actually particular types of information
that we’re likely to be getting as we work forward through the citizens
assembly is this idea of factual information about Scotland and the state
and what we’re doing and where things are at the moment but also evidence that
as the assembly we may choose to Commission to actually bring in this is
what we’re interested in finding out more about and bring evidence in to us
now a lot of that will go through this idea
of witness evidence so the people who are kind of come and talk to you about
different things as we move forward are being called witnesses okay and the
witnesses because they actually have they this is where I do need my notes
they’re considered to be particularly knowledgeable or particularly skillful
in a specific area and that’s why they’re being selected to come and speak
to you now there’s three different types of witnesses that we’re going to be
bringing to you over the next few weekends probably now there’s these
knowledge experts so individuals with that specialist knowledge about a
particular issue or a particular topic and someone like Nicola who came in with
speaking about about the constitutional issues comes in their stake holders now
stake holders are a bit different we call him stake holders because
they’re coming in because they believe in something they’re there to present a
case for one thing or another to you and experiencial witnesses so they are those
members of the public so they’re people who are coming and talking about their
own experience of an issue so there’s three different types of evidence now in
your packs when you arrive today you would have had a paper there about
evidential standards and this sets out in a bit more detail how the Secretariat
and the conveners are going to go about choosing who who it is that comes to
different types of information for you and do it in a way that actually makes
sure that the evidence that the Assembly presents you is balanced is diverse so
looking at different sides of an issue is accessible we need it to make sense
people are coming from a whole lot of different areas of knowledge already so
we need to make sure that everyone across the room actually is able to
engage with this type of information that it’s robust that it’s serious and
that it comes from credible sources but while we can do our bit it’s up to you
how you interpret that and people will give different weights of value to
different types of evidence but we need you to think about this and think about
some of these ideas how you’re approaching the evidence is presented to
you because evidence isn’t self-evident it needs to be interpreted any evidence
is selected from among a whole range of information sources that are out there facts are not neutral and that comes
into that idea of like there are things that affect but if I present to you as a
survey result the fact that 80 percent of people are really happy with waiting
times at their GP surgery might be a fact I can sell this is a great news
story but actually it’s still twenty percent of people which is one in every
five people who aren’t happy about that and if I was coming from a different
perspective I could sell that to you as a really this is a crisis we need to
move so it’s about thinking that facts aren’t necessarily neutral and knowledge
is not all the same we’re talking about these different types of sources some
people you hear from they’re going to be coming from a more theoretical
perspective something they’ve studied they’ve learnt a lot about others we’ll
be doing from that idea of social research they’ve gone out they’ve
surveyed you know 5,000 people across Scotland and come up with certain
results and they’re coming to talk to you and others will be talking about
their own experience things they’ve seen first town these are all different types
of evidence and you individually might give more importance
to one or the other and that’s something individual that we do depending on where
we stand on a whole lot of other moral and ethical issues and also as much as
we can do our bit to bring in robust credible information to you
you’re not empty vessels you all know things you’re all reading news you’re
all seeing all sorts of stuff and over the course of the weekends the things
that you know and the things that you think you know but actually might have
come from a less reliable source you could be sharing them with each other as
well so we need to be thinking about how we take evidence on board and really
that comes down to this idea of critical thinking and critical thinking and Phil
mentioned it as well is not just about being critical it’s not just about
finding the floors finding the gaps finding the fake news it’s also about
that idea of stepping back and looking at the evidence asking questions
thinking about where it comes from and also recognizing your own cognitive
biases now cognitive biases is really just that usually unconscious way that
the information we presented to you is interpreted and understood in your own
mind so when we ask people to sort of step back and think about those
cognitive biases it’s almost like being asked to step back and take a little
walk through your own head to think about well why do I react to some things
in certain ways why do some things seem intuitively like
oh that that makes a lot of sense is it because of the way the person presents
it is it because of the qualifications of the person who presents it or is it
just actually like what they were wearing that day so there are a couple
of specific cognitive biases that I want to talk a little bit more about because
they’re particularly relevant to the types of discussions that we’re going to
be having over the next couple of weekends that we’re together and what we
need to think about is these cognitive biases I’m gonna go back one slide these
cognitive biases I’m not a bad thing they’re normal we
all have them it’s how we you interpret the world around us all the time if we
have to stop and critically think about and deliberately think about every
decision that we make in every opinion that we have all the time we’d never get
anywhere so they’re natural and they’re normal but what’s been discovered is
that actually these aren’t as individual quirks a lot of research has shown that
actually there’s systematic and regular types of cognitive biases that cut
across populations and have some level of impact on most people so that’s where
I want to talk about some of the few specific ones so one of the first ones
and one of the really obvious ones is this idea of confirmation bias and it’s
that tendency to react more favorably and also remember much more easily the
things that confirm what you already know or what you already think you know
or what feels right to you and sometimes we need to step back from that one so
when we’re doing these conversations as we go along try and do that in your head
let’s step back and go and I just remember in the bits that you know made
the most sense to me because actually even though we might be listening to the
same thing we’re not necessarily always all hearing the same thing because we
hear and we remember some of the things that kind of reflect what we already
know in-group bias most of us have a tendency to treat people that we see as
being a bit like ourselves more seriously we take more seriously more
favorably the types of things that they say and we can we can unconsciously give
more weight to the views of people that we go yeah you’re like me so therefore
you’re right because I’m right so we have a really diverse group here and we
need to occasionally step back and go let’s pay attention to what someone’s
actually saying rather than making those some of those assumptions conservatism
bias and again this is not a political point but it is one of those factors
that actually once we’ve put our opinion out there it can be a really natural
thing to keep sticking to it once you’ve put the view out there that this is what
I think about something it’s hard to have to say again publicly actually
you’ve said something really interesting that’s made me change my mind so you
know this that conservative conservatism bias that can get in the way of having
that type of deliberative conversation and dialogue where we understand each
other’s perspectives better and suddenly might get a new insight into something
important identifiable victim bias now this sounds a bit strange because
actually the word victim but it’s the way it gets termed that idea that
actually it’s most of us are more likely to be moved to pay attention to to give
more weight to that personal story of someone when someone’s telling you
something real that’s happened to them it can have a it can feel a lot more
important sometimes and we remember the details then potentially an academic
talking about exactly the same circumstances that this person might
have been one of 5,000 that were affected but actually these large
distant numbers often don’t have the same resonance with us and if we’re
talking about those different types of evidence and different type of witnesses
that will come we might need to keep that in mind and also when we’re talking
to each other someone tells you a really motive story that has actually their
truth experience you know it makes it makes more sense than someone talking
about although theoretically I heard from my mate that somebody else had this
thing happen to them so these are some of the things we need to balance when we
think about what wait do we give to different types of evidence and most of
us like to be liked you know most of us set out to actually get on with the
people we’re spending time with and that’s the idea of social desirability
bias that tendency to respond in ways that you know we think someone wants
wants us to whilst here we want them to like us and in these discussions we are
going to be moving into more more divisive more you know split
opinions and we need to be able to have those conversations without feeling but
people might not like me anymore I won’t fit in and that comes across really
strongly with this idea of groupthink and that’s one of the risks in an
assembly like this is that actually if we all start finding that middle ground
and no one really wants to express an outliar opinion because actually we want
to we want to fit in with the group and we want to have a good time
there actually that doesn’t help us reach consensus it actually just stops
that critical evaluation of different viewpoints and can actually damage the
conversations so this is me finishing and I’m gonna hand you back and you’ll
get your dessert but you’ve heard from me you’ve heard from Phil hopefully
we’ve prompted some thoughts in your head and it’d be good at the tables just
even spend the first little while – your dessert comes just having a bit of a
reflection a bit of a discussion about or what sort of information do we trust
most do you recognize some of these things in
yourself and how could they have an impact on our discussions over the next
few weekends if we don’t step back and think about them so thank you very much wonderful thank you very much to Phil
and Kaela for getting us started on our journey for the weekend I just wanted to
introduce myself briefly and give you a few details for tomorrow so my name is
Kelly McBride I’m gonna be the lead facilitator for the weekend so you’re
going to see me popping up across Saturday and Sunday telling you a little
bit about some of the activities we’re going to be doing and some of the
discussions that we’ll be having and just generally floating around the room
to be a helping hand and guide you on your way so for those of you that may be
feeling a bit tired at this point I just wanted to let you know that it’s
absolutely fine if you want to go away to bed or just spend some time and not
hang around for the dessert and coffee that’s coming so please of you if you
want to go away at this point you’re very very welcome to do so but otherwise
you’re very welcome to all stay for a dessert and coffee and we’ll be in this
room tour just after 9 o’clock tonight and tomorrow we’ll be having breakfast
from 7:30 a.m. and you’ll be welcome to come and register from 8:30 and we’ll be
starting sharply at 9 o’clock in the room so I look forward to seeing you all
there I think we’re gonna have a fantastic weekend of discussion but
please if you’re staying do enjoy your dessert but you’re very welcome to pop
ahead to bed at this point – thank you everyone I see you tomorrow

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