Civil Part eCourtsTraining

Civil Part eCourtsTraining


Braunschweiger: This document, if you didn’t pick up, please pick up at the end and you want to keep this. This is your most important document. That’s the roll out schedule and as you can see it has Civil, eCourts has already begun in
Mercer and Middlesex, Morris and Sussex, taking a little break in June for
feedback to the project directors here and to maybe implement some changes and updates. And then they’re going to continue on pretty much every two weeks rolling out in a different county. You will see that our vicinage is at the very end. That was calculated on my part. But let me share with you a better
understanding about this roll out. As the counties roll out and go
into production, law firms attorneys, you will still be able to file
in hard copy the old-fashion way. But only for a period of sixty days. After a county has been in
production in eCourts, after sixty days, the current understanding is that eCourts will be mandatory. Now don’t hold me to it; there should be approval process soon
and a notice to the Bar is going out. So whatever the notice to the Bar says is what you’ll follow. But so know that statewide people
are on slightly different schedules, so this is kind of important to monitor. And I want to make another mention. If, as a county is rolling out, you for whatever reason, your firm is going to continue to file them in hard copy, the divisions are required for taking your hard copies and getting them scanned into and
uploaded into the electronic environment. So immediately these matters will be placed in eCourt. So when you’re filing, if you’re still filing manually, in a county that’s in production, I just want to give you a little helpful request from all the managers across the state. This will take a long time for the
staff to break apart, like with a crowbar. We have to take the exhibits out; they can’t be scanned. These things are not easy. So save your offices, save the offices a little bit of money. If you’re filing hard copy, we no longer need this, because the original has to be
broken down in order for us to scan, OK. Audience: I’m sorry. So we not bind it? Braunschweiger: Well, I said, the original’s in court. It would be helpful, because all
we’re going to do is break it apart and those things are really hard. We have to take out all the staples,
we have to take out all the exhibits. So we have to set it all up for our scanning purposes. So it would just be helpful. Audience: How would you like it submitted? You want a rubber band around it? Braunschweiger: That’s perfectly fine. Rubber bands and staples are still workable. Some of those bound documents are pretty hard to break apart, if you’ve ever had to try to do it. So it would just be a little bit of a help. Our understanding is that courtesy
copies will be, still be mandatory, despite the sixty days. Courtesy copies in motions will be mandatory for the judge. For the judge to see. And you can bind them and put in the tabs; they like things just as they are. Again, what will be helpful is if
those documents could clearly indicate that they’re courtesy copies, because all across the state we’ve
got people with different schedules. Some attorneys will be electronically filing, some will be taking advantage of the sixty days until they’re getting it electronically filed and we’re going to have all these courtesy copies around. To the extent that you can make that clear for us, the transition through the sixty days will go much smoother. Audience: [Inaudible 0:04:14.4]
Braunschweiger: Then my understanding, and again you’re going to look for
the notice to the Bar as if that county, once the sixty days has elapsed,
that attorneys must file electronically. Audience: Do they still want paper courtesy copies? Braunschweiger: Courtesy copies for motions, I’m just told today would be mandatory. They still want that. Audience: And after the sixty days? Braunschweiger: Yes, yes. It’s just your, you must send your original, your original submissions electronically. Great. And I have a few other things, but I want to keep going, because I know the room is warm and if there’s time at the end I will share that with you. But let me introduce you. Our panel today, they are both
individuals from the Administrative Offices of the Courts, specifically the
Automated Trial Court Services Unit. We have Project Manager Mark Talbot
and Project Manager Beth Ann Strom. This team has been going out to Bar
Association meetings all across the state, providing this Power Point presentation, which is going to be information
for you all, from the front end, what it’s going to look like, what you’re going to need and what
requirements will be needed to set that up. We have worked with this team for over a year now. Our vicinage was a part of the pilot for
eCourts in special civil and foreclosure, so we know how, they know our needs, they know our goals and they help us to get there. It’s been a great experience working
with special Civil Part over the year and I anticipate a great experience in the civil port as well. So with that, I’ll take it over to our presenters. Talbot: Thank you very much. Again, I’m Mark Talbot from the
Automated Trial Court Services Unit. I’m here with Beth Ann Strom and our agenda for today. We’re going to start with an eCourt’s overview, talk a little bit about the
history of eCourts, how we got here. Then we’re going to talk about the implementation status, where we’re going in the future. We’ll actually give you a walkthrough of Civil Part, this is our newest area for eCourts
and we’ll actually show you how it works. And then questions. Throughout this, we’re going to be going back and forth, showing you different pieces of
eCourts and we’ll stop at different points throughout this presentation to
open up the floor for questions. So before I begin, any questions? So overview. So what is eCourts? I’m going to start with Rule
1:32-2A which came out September 1, 2013. And this rule did three things. First it confirmed the judiciary’s intention and authority to develop an e-filing system. Second, confirm that the data and
documents in that system are just as good, just as valid as paper. And the third thing it did was
account for electronic signatures. So we knew everyone’s used to
standard signatures on a piece of paper and scanning them in, that type of technology. We wanted to go to electronic
signatures, so if you submit something, you just need a “/s” at the bottom, you hit “Submit”, that’s your electronic signature. Same with judges approving an
order, that’s their electronic signature. So that rule change really helped us build that foundation, gave us the authority to build out eCourts. So prior to that, it started with
the Supreme Court Special Committee on Information Technology and in 2009 they submitted a report really saying we need to head in this direction, to e-filing. From that, an Advisory Committee on
Information Technology was formed in 2010 to kind of figure out the direction of policies, procedures and the technical direction, where do
we want to go with our e-filing solution. So that Advisory Committee focused
on four core business principles. The first one is re-usability. We don’t want to build something from criminal, then something completely different for Civil, then something completely different for Family. We want to try to simplify the system, keep it consistent as well as the business process. Is there anywhere we can flatten it,
keep it the same for you doing the e-filing, the same for judges, the same for case management; we wanted to do that. The second is leveraging existing technologies. And there’s kind of two sides of this. One is we’re building e-Court on top
of existing mainframe applications, legacy applications we’ll call them as well. For Civil, this was ACMS, you may have heard of. It’s been around for a very long time. We’re not getting rid of that, we’re
building on top of that at this point. So the data you see in e-Courts, same
data we’re seeing in ACMS in case management. We also wanted to look to change rules
as needed to accommodate new technologies. We move into mobile. As technologies change, we may
need rule changes to accommodate that. The next core business principle was
advancing the core business of the courts. We wanted to move away from stamping
documents, data entry into the systems and work more on moving cases along, getting to that decision. So you’ll see that that’s part of our process, is here in e-Courts is to simplify that. The last is transparency. And look at this from a couple angles. One, if something’s happening on a case, all the parties should know about it real-time. If case management knows about it, something’s been scheduled, an order’s been generated, everyone should know about it. So we broadcast that information
out to the attorneys on the case as well as make it available to the public. This is something to keep in
mind, what you do here in e-Courts, is generally available to the public instantly. Same time you file, the public sees it. They would need to come into the courthouse, we’ll talk about that in a few minutes,
but that transparency’s key to e-Courts. So our development approach. How do we actually go about
building all this and the reality is, it’s one piece at a time. So when we focus on standardization
across all the courts, Criminal, Civil, as we roll out, Tax. We wanted to find common components:
e-filing, notifications, judgment entry, signing of orders. So again, it’s consistent across the courts. And what we build on one area, we
then typically move to the other areas. Another key part of our development is including the users. Instead of going away, building something for a couple years and coming back and showing a final product to you, we try to get out as early as possible to
judges, case management staff, attorneys, even coming out to Bar Associations and presenting what we’re
thinking, what we’re looking at doing next. And we’re seeking that feedback. We want to know what you think we
need next, what’s important to you, what doesn’t work and as we get that feedback, we adapt the system, add new features and functions. So again, see thinking one piece
at a time, we’re rolling this out. So you’re not going to see all
the functionality we hope to have in the current version, but it’s coming. So all that said, what does e-Courts actually provide? At its most basic level there’s three pieces. The first is e-filing; that’s attorneys submitting documents, filings to the court. The second is case management processing. That’s internally how we then process those. If I have a motion, I’m going to schedule it, I’m going to have an order come out of that. And the third piece is document management. That’s our electronic case jacket. So all the documents being filed, all the
court generated documents, notifications, etcetera, all being built out into our electronic case jacket. Any questions on the history of e-Courts? No? So next is availability. When can I file in e-Courts? So e-Courts is available typically 24/7. So anytime, day or night, you can e-file. A couple of caveats there. The first is we are down for system maintenance on occasion. We always try to schedule that
off or outside of business hours, so you’re not impacted. Other than that, we do have one
restriction at this point in time and this is part of our dependency on our legacy applications. Whereas normal court filing hours might be 8:30 to 4:30, we were able to expand that from 2:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. So anything filed between 2:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Monday through Friday gets that as
the file date stamp on the document. Once we get past 8:00 p.m. our legacy applications go into sort of a backup mode. We can’t docket those, so that all
those filings are going to be queued, as we’ll call it. So they’ll be held until 2:00 a.m. on the next business day. So if you file a complaint at 9:00
o’clock on a Friday night, 2:00 a.m. Monday morning is when it will get
docketed and it’ll pick up that date. Now I said all of our filings. There are some exceptions. Complaints and motions will get held, some other documents will actually go right through 24/7, but again, just think of it, once you get past that 8:00 p.m., you may not be able to get that as the file date stamp. If there’s an emergency, if you’ve got to file something, a new complaint at 11:00 o’clock at
night, emergent duty judges at your discretion. Same as in the past. If there’s a true statewide emergency, think about our court closures we
had earlier this year due to weather. Think about Super Storm Sandy where we had a significant amount
of time that the courts were closed. All those orders tolling the filing
deadlines apply to e-Courts as well. So if everything’s shut down for a day, that would buy you a day if an order
comes out extending those deadlines. Any question on that? Yes. Audience: Do you get a kickback if it’s,
[inaudible 0:14:27.3] it just accepts it, it doesn’t kick back into some out
of time issue or anything like that? Talbot: Great question. So the question is, if it’s out of time, if it shouldn’t truly be accepted by
the court, will e-Courts stop you upfront and not allow you to file it and the
answer is, as I think you just said, no. The system just accepts the filing. It’ll stamp it and then you would get a deficiency, we’ll talk about a little bit later,
telling you that it was out of time. But at this point there is nothing
in e-Courts to stop you from filing. Yes? Audience: Is there an ability under
e-Courts to file something under seal? Talbot: Great question. So can you file under seal in e-Courts? At this time within Civil, there is no way to file a
confidential document electronically. Anything that’s confidential, under
seal, would have to be filed on paper. In Criminal, they do have
security at the document level in place. We actually have three different
levels of security, so we can do it there. We don’t have that in Civil yet, but we look to work on developing
that in the not too distant future. Audience: Do we need to get then a special order if you’re beyond the 60 days in
the county, after the roll out? Talbot: Typically what we have done is on the, on the notices to the Bar that say this is required, there’s usually an exception in there, I believe, that says all confidential documents will still be filed on paper until we get security in place. Any other questions? So I’m going to switch over to a
little bit more technical stuff. The first is we are browser based, Internet browser based. How many people here use Chrome? Safari? Informable and Internet Explorer? We support those. Go in, use the application. You can use it from an iPad, you
can use it from any device you want that has one of those browsers on it, should work fine. If you have any technical
problems, just call into our Help Desk, you should be good. We do have a 30 minute timeout, which just like almost any e-commerce site, banking site. After a period time, if you’re
not doing anything on our system, we automatically log you out, so just bear that in mind if you’re
in the middle of filing something. In terms of documents to be attached. They need to be in PDF format, so
convert it to PDF and upload it. We’ll take it in. We do have one exception to that, which is proposed forms of order
need to be in Microsoft Word format. And we do that, so the court gets a copy that they can edit and you want to keep that formatting as simple as possible, so it’s easier for the judge to go in and make modifications. So again, that’s Microsoft Word for proposed orders. Audience: Everything else is PDF? Talbot: Yes, everything else is
PDF, except for the proposed orders. Audience: You said something about timing out. If you’re in the middle of something and you time out, do you go back and pick up where you
left off or you have to start all over? Talbot: So the timeout at 30 minutes is if you haven’t done any interaction with the system, so if you use Amazon, something like that, typically if you’re in the middle of buying something, it’ll say, oops, you’ve been away too long. If you’re actively uploading documents and things like that, it should not timeout on you. But if you walk away and get a cup
of coffee for half an hour, then yeah. And Beth Ann’s actually going to talk in a little bit about, there’s some places you can save some documents. You’ll see that in a bit. Right now for each individual
attachment in e-Courts, 7 MB limit. That means we can’t go over that. If you’re creating a PDF and it’s 8
Meg, the system will not allow it. Now you can break up a large document into multiple pieces, so you can have multiple 7 MB documents. A little bit more on kind of a technical rule. This is available to all attorneys. I’ll actually show you how to log in a few minutes, but you’re an attorney, if
you’ve got a Bar ID, you can get in. It’s free access to documents. How many people here use Pacer? All right. Great, great. So you’re familiar with e-filing. You’re also familiar they’ve got
the get one look free, is that it? Right. So there is no first look is free, we change for the rest. It’s just free access. Go in, look at the documents, go in tomorrow, look at the documents again, no issues there. Audience: So when you e-file something, normally like right now we get an
email that has the document number, like number 20 and you click on it and you can see it, OK. Like your pre-book or whatever, OK. Are we going to get an email
confirming that we filed something? Talbot: Yes. The question is do you get a confirmation email? We’ll cover that was well in a few minutes. We’re kind enough and send you two emails. So yes, you will be getting those. Something else to keep in mind. All of documents in the case jacket are in PDF format, so even if you submitted on Word
format for the court to work with, we automatically convert it to PDF, so everything in the case jacket
is PDF, so there’s no worries there. Do keep in mind, though, with the case
jacket, we go live today in a county, all the older documents from a case,
from prior cases, from current cases, aren’t going to be in the case jacket. So you’re just kind of seeing point forward. And all the documents are public for now. We talked a little bit about that document level security. We don’t have that yet in Civil, so everything now is public, so they can get in and see it. Any questions on that. I’m going to turn this over to Beth Ann Strom to talk about the implementation status. Strom: Good afternoon. So going back a little bit to some
historical information about e-Courts, e-Courts began in the Criminal Division in the summer of 2014 and we started e-Courts with motion filing and eventually expanded to other document types in Criminal, most recently criminal justice reform has closed a few more enhancements in that area. e-Courts for the Tax court was implemented in 2015. This began with complaints and now Tax court accepts all documents through e-Courts. Last year we retired the old JEFIS electronic filing system in Special Civil and Foreclosure. And so they were replaced with e-Courts throughout the summer and fall
of last year on a rolling basis. So all of Foreclosure cases and
all of Special Civil cases are now filed in e-Courts and there’s
mandatory e-filing for those case types. For the Civil Part, as Mary said, we’ve already started implementing on a rolling basis. Mercer County went live April 28,
Middlesex County followed early in May. Morris and Sussex went live last week. And so for all four of those counties
you can e-file any courts right now. Vicinages are added on a rolling basis. Mary was kind enough to provide you
with a roll out schedule for that. You can file for cases that have
already begun, as Mark mentioned, so you don’t have to start a new complaint for any filed case. However, if you’re going to e-file
onto an existing case as Mark said, the paper documents are probably not going to be available. The vicinages will be doing some
back-loading of paper case documents as needed, but there’s no particular formal schedule for that, so don’t expect the paper documents
necessarily to be in the e-Courts case jacket, at least for a while. Training sessions are being offered all throughout the state, just as we are here today. We’ve been in most of the counties by now, a few more to go. We also have training sessions available at the Central Office and a few throughout the state that
are a little more detailed than this. It’s more of a live demo than
this is really static screen shots, so those are available. There is a schedule of those courses available on the Judiciary website on the e-Courts’ page, so anyone that wasn’t able to come to this presentation today, either attorneys or their staff,
they can sign up for those courses. We’re also providing training, of course, to the vicinages, the judges and the court staff as we roll out. And so Mary’s staff isn’t going
to be trained for a little while, but they are going to have a few staff that are going to be knowledgeable of e-Courts for Civil Part, even early on. So that was my little snipped and I’m
going to go back to Mark for a minute to talk to you about registration and logging into e-Courts and then I’ll be back and walk you through a complaint. Talbot: OK, so external filings overview. I’m going to start with a very simple flow chart showing the process of filing in e-Courts. First is, you log in. Then you’ll make a decision, you
either want to file, create a new case, new complaint or you want to
file something on an existing case. Then you enter your filing data,
attach any documents, review everything, make sure it’s what you want to submit. Click on “Submit”, at which point
you’ll get that e-filing confirmation and everything will be in the case jacket. That’s it in a nutshell. Pretty straightforward. Audience: When do you assign the docket number? Talbot: When is a docket number assigned? Monday through Friday, 2:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., as soon as you hit “Submit” you’ll get a docket number. Audience: An actual docket number when you file, simultaneous? Talbot: When you hit “Submit”,
you’re going to go hit our servers. We’ll assign a docket number and
then we’ll present it back to you. So logging into e-Courts. I mentioned before, use your Bar ID. Assuming everyone did the online
annual registration, it’s that Bar ID. It’s that same password. Audience: Not the single sign in ID? Talbot: It should be one and the same, if you’re an attorney. It would be your Bar ID and then password. We call it SSO, so I’m assuming that’s
it, unless you’ve ? there’s a few odd ones. Audience: The Bar ID, I think was like the three initials and then your Social Security,
but then there’s single sign in. Is that what we use, the single sign in? Talbot: Last word, it should be the
year that they passed the Bar exam and the first, I forget, is it five digits? Four? That ID number, yeah. So you can get to this through our
website, which actually was just redesigned. Just go there. You’ll see links for e-Courts. This is also where we have all the training materials. Yes? Audience: What if someone other than an
actual attorney is doing the submission? Talbot: So what, let me ? Audience: How do they e-signature? Talbot: Right. So that’s a good question. If somebody else is going to hit
“Submit” other than the attorney, I guess my best response on that
would be the attorney’s responsible for everything submitted with that Bar ID. At this point in time there is no delegation of authority from a technical perspective. We don’t allow an attorney to set up like sub-accounts to allow other people to file on their behalf. So anything that’s submitted under that Bar ID is the same as the attorney submitting it. So the attorney’s responsible for it? Audience: What about a pro se person? Talbot: So pro se filing is not something we currently have. Unfortunately, that would still
be coming in on paper and vicinages have to upload that into the system and
then notifications, etcetera would go out. We’re looking forward to doing that in the future, but right now we do not have pro se electronic filing. Audience: Do you have to put your
client’s street address as part of the filing? It looks like what’s required. Talbot: Great question on getting
into the details of adding a party and I’m going to wait until Beth Ann
covers that in a few if that’s all right. Good that you’re reading ahead, though. That’s good. Yes, I’m sorry. Audience: If you have a pro se
plaintiff that filed a complaint and you would like to file an answer
to that, do you do that online or no? Talbot: Yeah, that’s a great question. So if the case started before
e-Courts came into play in a county, if it was created by someone who did not
electronically file, you can still e-file. The case is there and you can file whatever you need to on it, regardless of its history. Yes? Audience: So a pro se litigant, do
you have to serve them personally or will e-Courts handle the service for you? Talbot: If it’s a pro se litigant and you need to serve them, then you are still responsible for serving them. The court’s not going to go and serve them on your behalf. And there’s really no way to electronically serve someone who’s pro se at this point in time. They don’t have accounts yet in the
system, so until we can work that out, it would still be paper. All right, so again, you log in with your Bar ID and password. We do have a thing called “Step Up”
authentication we did a while ago. If you did your annual registration, you had to ask, or respond to a security question or two. We don’t require those for e-Courts filings, so just something to bear in mind
if someone else is doing e-filing, they still would not access to your online registration. Once you go to our website you click on “e-Courts” link. First time you go in you’ll have to pass through an agreement, where you agree to abide by the terms of electronic filing and agree to receive electronic notifications. Two key pieces. So this is our actual log in page. When we show you pictures of the
system, some of these are mockups, some of these are from out test system, so if something looks a little off, please bear with us. You would type in your user ID
and password here, click on “Log In” or there’s instructions for resetting your password, etcetera. Initial log in to e-Courts. You have to go through our registration and this is where you would read our Participation Agreement. Read through it, scroll down, print it out if you want to. And then you have two check boxes at the bottom of this page. The first again is you agree to abide by our terms and the second is to receive electronic notification. Once you’ve checked off both of those
boxes and click on “Save” and “Continue”, you’re done with this. One and done. You shouldn’t have to see this page again. Audience: You don’t have to do that for
county or ? Talbot: Statewide e-Courts. Audience: Statewide. Once you’re registered, you’re done. Talbot: Yep. If you are currently filing in
Criminal, Special Civil Part, Tax, you’ve already done this, you won’t see this again. First time to e-Courts, you will see it. Yes? Audience: When you agree to accept electronic service, I assume that’s for everything
other than the initial complaint. Right, the initial complaint still
has to be served on the defendant, I guess we know. Talbot: Right. So when you click on “I
agree to receive electronic service”, on an initial complaint, the, no one’s entered in on that case on behalf of the defendant, so that is still paper at this point, yeah. Yes. So again, one and done. I’m here. And this screen, you’ll see every time you log into e-Courts. First thing it does up at the top, see a little Help icon, a little thing way up at the top. And that’s actually the link, click on that. It’ll give you help with the page. It is context sensitive, so if
you’re in the middle of an e-filing, click on “Help”, it’ll give you help on that page. If you’re in case jacket, it’ll
give you help on the case jacket. Next it shows you who you are. This is just kind of throwing
back your attorney ID, your name. Just make sure your log knows the right person. And then underneath that is our Help Desk number. If you have any technical problems,
issues, etcetera, please give us a call; we’ll work with you to get through that. And then we go through our firm information. And this is going to show what firm we’re associated with and if we have multiple firms we’re
associated with, you’ll see them listed out. You’d select the one that you’re
filing on behalf of for that day. If anything’s wrong there, you go
into Attorney Registration, update it. To the right of that are email addresses. This is key. This is the heart of our notification process. We give you up to three email addresses for notification. So the first one’s required. The little red asterisk next to
there, that’s used throughout the system, something that you’re required to fill out has a red asterisk. You must give us at least one good email address and every time you come in through this page, you’re kind of verifying yes,
that’s still a good email address. You have two additional email addresses you can add if you want to have a partner notified, administrative person notified, they would get it as well. Now this is global. I’m sorry, yes? Audience: What if two firms are
filing a pleading as co-counsel? Talbot: So you have two different firms
on the same pleading ? Audience: Correct. Talbot: one firm would, on the same pleading. I’m going to defer to Beth Ann; on this one, I’m not sure. Audience: Two plaintiffs firms
representing the same plaintiff. Strom: Two firms can represent the same plaintiff, but only one can make a filing at a time, so the other firm would still
have to file some kind of appearance to get onto the case. File a document or a Notice of
Appearance in order to get onto the case. Audience: So the initial complaint, when you send it in, it would have two firms on the standing
complaint, but only one firm on the filing? Strom: That’s right. The initial complaint for e-Courts would only have one firm on the filing initially, yes. Audience: Put one of the other firm’s
email as a notification of the filing? Strom: You can certainly put one of
the other firm’s email as a notification, however, because Mark didn’t
finish going through this screen yet, the three emails that you have there
are global for all of your firm’s cases. So I don’t recommend that. Audience: That’s what I wanted to ask, too. Like we have 20 attorneys, but we
can only put three to get notices? Strom: No. A lot of firms will create a generic email address and then they have someone move them around, but you certainly only have a small number of attorneys that need to be notified on an individual case. Audience: Right. Is this per case? Strom: This is per attorney. This is per attorney, so this is an attorney that’s logged in and you’re confirming your firm
address and the email addresses that this attorney wants their notifications to go to. Audience: Like my boss, his name’s
on the case, he’s the filing attorney. He’s going to get everybody’s notifications and then they have to be forwarded to the other people? [Everyone speaking at once] Strom: Any case he files. So if you’re logged in as him, these are the email addresses that he’s going to get. Other attorneys log in as themselves ?
Audience: But globally, not per case. Strom: No. So these three email addresses are per attorney, but they would be for all cases that
that attorney is associated to, OK? Audience: This really limits you
in having only one or two associates get notice on the same file. Strom: It does, yes. It limits you to having no more
than two other persons on that. Audience: Globally. Strom: Globally, yeah, for all your cases, yes. Yes? Audience: In U.S. District Court, a
lot of times if an attorney starts it and then he hands it off to someone else and then we want to get the first attorney off, we file a notice to remove from electronic filing. Do we do something then like that for Civil Court? Strom: So unlike in the Federal system, e-Courts does not have a notice
to remove from electronic filing. But any attorney who files a document
onto the case is going to get notifications, so if you have more than one attorney filing onto the case, they will all get notifications. Audience: So in other words, if you’re filing a complaint by
attorney number one in the firm and then subsequently attorney number two files a motion and put his contact information and
emails, then both attorneys would get notice? Strom: Yes, any attorney that files a document in e-Courts has now entered an appearance, as it were, onto that case and so they’ll all get notices. Audience: Do you say there’s no way to remove an attorney? What if an attorney leaves the firm? Strom: If an attorney leaves a firm, you
can still file a substitution of attorney and that attorney will sub out as normally. Yes? Audience: [inaudible 0:37:04.5]
Strom: Yes, they can substitute out. Audience: But will the first attorney still get the notices? Strom: Once an attorney substitutes
out, they won’t get notices anymore. Talbot: So what she said. So happy scenario. You go on vacation for two weeks, again this global. When we say “global”, criminal filings, Special Civil Part filings, Civil Part filings, Tax filings, all go into these same email addresses for that attorney. So if you go on vacation for two weeks, you come in, log in, change your email addresses, route
them to somebody else in your office and they’ll get all of your notifications while you’re gone. Come on back in, change it again,
you’ll start getting them again. And to elaborate just a little bit on what Beth Ann said, we’ve seen some larger firms, every attorney in that firm has as their email address a generic firm email address. And their IT departments have taken it
upon themselves to route all of those. They can actually parse out the email
notifications, update their systems. There’s a lot of flexibility there. We don’t want to give an unlimited number of email addresses, because it’s quite a load on the mail
servers to be sending out to lots and lots, so we were well over, I think 10,000 a day, emails coming out of our servers,
so just give you some idea there. So again, you’ll see this screen every time you come in. You have the option to modify it and then just click on “I certify” and you continue on. This is our e-Courts homepage. And you’ll see it says “Home” up at the top. There’s three tabs up there. Again we start with the Help. Up at the top, you can click on, get some information on it. You’ll see your name reflected back and you’ll see our Help Desk number listed out there. Again, if you have any problems,
questions or technical issues, give us a call. Underneath that is where we select our court or division. So this is where we go in and say I want to file in Criminal, I want to file in Special Civil Part, I want to file in Tax, I want to file
in Civil Part, which is what we see here. Click on that and then based on that, you’ll see an announcement section at the bottom. This is where we can give you
information on what we’re doing with the system. If there’s going to be a system outage, we’ll post it here. System enhancements, we’ll post it there. Some other instructions, please do this or don’t do that. We can post stuff right there to
get you the information very quickly. Then we have two options. I picked my court, read the announcements. I can either e-file from here or look at the case jacket for any case that’s out there. We have that also as tabs at the top. You can click on the “e-filing” and “case jacket” tabs there. It’s redundant, but you’ll see throughout
the system it can be a little bit easier, depending where you are, to which you select it. So I’m going to turn it back to Beth
Ann for walking through a complaint. Strom: OK. And just to give you a
roadmap of where we’re going from here on out, I’m going to walk you through the filing of a complaint and then Mark is going to come back up and he’s going to show you the case jacket in detail. So a few things that I show you, I’m
going to move through a little quickly, but he’s going to be covering them right afterward. It just made a little more sense to show you a document filed before we show a case jacket. Then after Mark goes through the case jacket, I’m going to show you the filing of
an answer and the filing of a motion. So for a complaint. You’re going to start from the home
screen that Mark had just shown you. So once you’ve logged in, you go to this screen. You can either click on the tab for
“e-file” or here as we’ve indicated, click on the “e-file” button. This is slide 21. In the next screen, it’s going
to have three different sections. I’m going to go through those three
sections quickly and then we’ll move ahead. So on the top of that section, if
you were filing on an existing case, you would put in the venue and the docket number. Here, we’re going to be filing a new case, so we would click on the “New Case” button. Before we do that, I want to
show you the bottom of this screen, which is Pending Filings. Now we’re not showing you any
here, but for complaint filings only, because there’re so many steps
to filing a complaint in e-Courts, you can save your work and go back to it later. And you’ll see as we go through these screens, there are a couple of screens where you can save. So if this firm that we’re looking
at had saved any complaint filings, had not submitted them yet, but had just stopped at some point,
you would see a list of those below. We’ve also seen some of the firms in Special Civil have told us that they may have
a paralegal or a legal secretary, some staff person do the work of
the complaint and save it in Pending and then the attorney goes in and reviews that and then hits the “Submit” button themselves and that’s one way to ensure the attorney’s responsibility ultimately for that filing. Of course, you can do whatever method works for your law firm. So here we’re going to click on “New Case”. And it takes you to a screen that has a lot of stuff on it. Now I just want to ask how many people in the room are already working in Special
Civil or Foreclosure for e-Courts? Some. So, so you have to get my back here and assure everybody that this actually goes a lot quicker. So I’m going through it slowly to show you the steps, but it really does go quickly. So on this screen you’ll see a
lot of things and this is slide 25. You’ll see a lot of items that look
really familiar and they look like the questions that are asked for the
case information statement for the CIS. So some good news about e-Courts. It creates the CIS form for you, so you don’t have to type in a form or make a form, but you do have to provide us the information, so that e-Courts can create the form for you. So most of the questions involved in the CIS are on this page. First you’re going to select your venue and then you’re going to click on one of two certifications, stating as to whether or not this case has any related cases currently in the courts or anticipated. Then we move down to the next section, “Enter Case Details”. The first thing you’re going to do is click on the type of document that you’re filing. Here it’s a complaint. There are other types of documents that could initiate a case and give it a docket number and so
those are all on the dropdown box. It could be a petition. We have a separate one for a name change complaint, a verified complaint with order to show cause. But here we’re filing a straight complaint and so that’s what we’re going to select. And then you’re going to select the case type. In this example, personal injury
and that would be a dropdown box that would give you all the available case types. And then you put in the case caption. Notice that to the left of all of those
fields is a red asterisk, so e-Courts, if the field is a required field, you will see a red asterisk. If it’s optional, you won’t. The next field, which we have outlined in
red for you is called “Law Firm Case ID”. That’s not a mandatory field. This is a place for you to put your file number for a case. It is alpha-numeric. You can use a combination of letters and numbers. And this is for the purpose of when you get that notification back with the docket number, you’re also going to get the firm ID, the firm’s case ID, so that you can match up that
docket number with your own file number. Audience: How many numbers of letters can we use? Strom: I’m not really sure how big that field is, but we haven’t had anyone
complaining that it’s not big enough, so I guess that’s good enough. Not mandatory, but it’s for your convenience purely just to help you out a little bit. Then you’re going to go on and
answer some of those CIS questions. Your jury demand, putative class
action, Hurricane Sandy related and so forth. And there’s also a text box at the bottom, which again corresponds with the block on the CIS form, which is a free form field and you can
put any other information about the case that you want the court to know. Once you’ve completed this
screen, you’re going to hit “Continue”. And now you’re going to, I’m sorry. Audience: One second, if there is a
related case, where would that form be put? In that box at the bottom? Strom: If there is a related case,
actually you’ll get another text box and you can put that, you can put that information there. So in the next screen you’re going to enter the plaintiff. In our example, we only have one
plaintiff, but notice the blue plus sign there. Every time you go to add a party in e-Courts, or if you’re adding a document
when it’s time to upload documents, you’re going to see that blue plus sign. You can hit that as many times as you need to. There’s no limit on the number of
parties or on the number of documents that you can have in a filing. So we’re going to hit the blue plus sign. It’s going to give us a pop-up box and
we are on slide, I’m sorry, slide 27. Here is where you’re going to
put information about your party. And all of this information goes to ACMS, the Case Management system and all
of this, if it has a red asterisk, is required by ACMS with one
exception and I’ll explain that in a moment. So here we’re going to put the party type is a plaintiff. The party description in this case is individual. And I want to stop and explain this
particular field to you a little bit, because there’s only two values that you can choose. One is individual and the other is business. This is not a type of a party. We know there’s other types of parties
rather than just individuals or businesses. This is just a format for the name field. So when you select individual, when
you go to put in the party’s actual name, it breaks out a first name, a middle initial and a last name. In the business format, that is one long field. It’s just a single field and you type in the name. The address. The address for your client is not a required field. Any of those address fields are not required. However, you notice in our example
that there are red asterisks there. The reason is that any time you enter
something in any one of those address fields, all of them are required. So for example, if on that first
address line you put in “Not Applicable”, because you’re not going to put
your client’s address in there, then you have to fill out the whole thing. So don’t put anything. This is of more use for the court staff
for ? Audience: Don’t put “Not Applicable”? Strom: Don’t put “Not Applicable”,
because then you’re going to have to fill out all those address fields with something. So the court staff sees their
version of this, the internal version is almost identical to what you’re seeing. So when the court staff is putting
in information on say, a pro se party and they’re uploading that document, they have to put in all of that address information. If a party is represented by counsel,
you don’t have to put in an address. And there’s also a spot for a phone number and again, that’s an optional field as well. Down at the bottom is really the more interesting section, because that name field is very limited. The first name only has nine characters and of course, middle initial is one and last name
has twenty for a total of 30 characters. That is an ACMS limitation. However, party names may be longer or there may be more information
about that party that you need to convey. So for example, if this party’s name
instead of being Andrew was Christopher, Christopher doesn’t fit. It comes out as “Christoph”, it cuts it off. You could go down to the section below and click on an “Alternate Type of Full Spell” and then in the “Alternate Type” field to the right of it, you can put a fuller name. You could spell out the entire name. That’s 49 characters, so it’s a little bit bigger. If your client is a business owner
and you want to put a “trading as”, “doing business as”, if it’s an estate, there’s numerous, and this is only showing a few of them on this screen, there are numerous alternate party
types of alias types that you can put in. You have the option to put in five
names if you need to go that many. If any of you work in foreclosures,
sometimes foreclosure plaintiff parties have very, very long names and they’re
going to actually use all five lines. But for most cases you don’t need that many. Audience: Do you still have to enter
John Doe, 1, 2, 5 and A, B, C appropriations or is that like a linking click? Strom: So the question is for fictitious parties. Do you still have enter John Doe,
one through whatever, A, B, C company and yes, you do and you would put that in as a
party name with a business format. All right. Any other questions about the party name before we go on? So once you complete this screen and
save it, it’ll take you back to that original screen and then you can
add as many parties as you want. We’re actually not showing you that here. Once you’ve added all the parties, you click “Continue” and you move onto enter the defendants. So this will be the same thing. You’re going to click on the blue plus sign and here, this particular party is going to be in the business format. This is not a business, this
defendant is the State of New Jersey, but you’re going to use that format
where it’s going to be all one long field. Put in an address if you want to; you don’t have to. And then click “Save”. Once you’ve entered a party, you will
be able to see the party on that screen. And now we’re on slide 30. I could probably use your paper. Now we’re on slide 30 and as you can see, some information about that party is already available to you. And notice to the left of the party that you can click on “Modify” if you made a mistake, a typo and you want to go back and fix it or
you can even click on the trash can icon all the way to the left and delete that
party altogether and start over again. If you had any additional parties, you would click the blue plus sign and use the same process. There are few more questions at the bottom of this screen. One is asking does the defendant
have a primary insurance company? If they do and you know it, then you’re going to click “yes”. And again, this comes from the CIS and there’s a dropdown box. You can start to type in the name of an insurance company or you can select one from the dropdown. And then the other question, do the parties have a current, past or recurrent relationship? And if you click “yes” for that, it’s
going to ask you the type of relationship, again directly from the CIS form and that is for the purpose of
the court determining what, if any, type of alternative dispute
resolution the case is going to need. Once you’ve entered all your
defendants, you’re going to click on “Continue”. Audience: The John Does, would that come here? They’re not going to come on the plaintiff’s page. Strom: The John Does would come
here on the defendant page, yes, yeah. You’re now at the stage where you’re
going to upload the complaint document. Now again, as I said, you can
upload as many documents as you want to; there’s no limit on the number of
documents, so if you need to break it up, if it’s a particularly long complaint, if there’s any exhibits or other
documents that you’re attaching to your complaint, you can upload them all as separate documents. Yes? Audience: Is it required to like, if you do have exhibits, do you want the complaint separate from the exhibits? Do you want the exhibits like
individually scanned in and uploaded that way? Strom: There’s no specific requirement for how to break up documents or if you should break them up. However, I’ll tell you that when
you start to look at case jackets that if you can break them up at this upload stage, it’s really easier to follow a case jacket. Audience: So you’d rather just have the complaint filed and then attach the exhibits
separately as just marked exhibits? Strom: And it’s easier to view a case
jacket if documents are broken up, yes. So you’re going to click on “Browse” and just find the document that you
want to upload from wherever it is stored on your system and click on “Save”. And you’ll get a confirmation that says the document has been successfully uploaded and
that’s in green at the top of slide 32. Now I want to show you a couple of things on this page and you’ll see this in a lot of sections in e-Courts. Notice the blue lines. The first one, right underneath that
green confirmation says “Case Details” and there’s a little triangle, a little black triangle. We call that a twisty. So here you can see the case
caption, but if you click on that twisty, it’s going to expand and it’s going to
give you the information about the case that you had entered. The same with “Filer” and “Adversary”
and even “Upload Required Documents”, although we have that open. And the reason that we do that, we compress these sections, so that it’s easier to see them on the screen. If you don’t need to see everything, you don’t have to scroll down to
get down to the bottom of the screen; you can just click the little
twisties and compress those sections, you don’t have to look at them. But if you need to look at them, you can open them up. Audience: When you say twisty, do you mean the arrow? Strom: I mean the little black triangle, yes. Yeah, we call it a twisty. Other people probably have better names for it. Audience: We can call it a triangle, right? Strom: you can call it a triangle. So before you go ahead and submit this complaint, there’s one very important thing that you need to do. And in the middle of the screen,
you see there’s a certification. “I certify that I have redacted all confidential
personal identifiers pursuant to Rule 1:38-7”. So you’re going to get this checkbox certification with every filing that you make
in e-Courts, every single filing, even though you may have done it with
the initial filing as required by the Rule, you have to do it every time you file. And e-Courts will not let you go
on unless you check that checkbox. So this is just a reminder. It’s actually the first reminder,
because you’ll see another one in a moment. The first reminder that you have
to make sure that you’re redacting any confidential personal identifiers. Once you’ve done that, you can go ahead. By the way, I didn’t point out to you earlier, but we’ve now reached point of entering a complaint where you can save without going forward. There were a few before that I didn’t point out to you. But if you notice on the bottom of this screen, there are three buttons on the
bottom on the right, a back button, a Save button and a Continue button. So any screen where you have that Save button, you can save and turn that into a pending complaint. You can go back to it later to finish it. But here we’re almost ready to go on,
so once you’ve checked that checkbox, you’ve uploaded all of ? yes? Audience: If you save something, can anybody else access it? See if it’s something that’s saved in pending? Strom: If you save a document to
Pending, only someone from your firm can see it. Yeah, it’s not visible to the public
and it’s not visible to other attorneys, or I should say other law firms. So once you hit Continue, you’re
ready to pay for your complaint. So all of the other information that
you’ve seen displayed is still available, but down at the bottom is a Fee section. And so a couple of areas of this Fee
section that I want to point out to you. One is, there is a checkbox to certify if
your client is exempt from the filing fee and we’ll show you that in a moment. Well, we’ll show you that when we do the answer walkthrough, that there will be a dropdown box with reasons. So you’re going to have to state a
reason that your client is exempt. Below that checkbox is the filing fee. This filing fee’s based on the document type that you selected in the very beginning. e-Courts calculates that automatically. To the right is where you select your payment information. And so, as Mark said, the only way that you can pay
for a filing in e-Courts right now is through a Judiciary Collateral Account or JACS account. If you don’t have a JACS
account, it is very easy to set one up. You can go on the Judiciary
website, under the section for attorneys. Follow the instructions. You do it online. They do take ACH payments and other types of payments, so you can load that account immediately. For those of you who don’t have a JACS account, just to let you know that you do
need to put $500 in it to start and you have to maintain a balance of $300 at all times. So you need to make sure that you’re maintaining that balance. It is very easy to check your balance online however, and it’s very easy to reload that account. We are looking at other payment methods. There aren’t any available right now,
but as you can see, we’ve already built in, because that’s a dropdown box, so as
soon as other payment methods are available, they’re going to be added to that dropdown. Right now Collateral Account is the only thing you can check. When you logged in, e-Courts knows what Collateral
Account or Accounts your firm has and so if you have more than one, you’ll have to select one. If you only have one, it’s just going to display that one. You can also add a JACS client reference number. This is not an e-Courts field; it has nothing to do with e-Courts. It has to do with your monthly
statements from the JACS account. So some firms put some information on there to help them to identify the charges on their account. So they may put, for example, a client file number. They may put some code that represents
the attorney that’s working on that case or a paralegal that’s working on the case. It’s an alpha-numeric field. There’s no edit, so on it you can
basically put whatever you want. And again, the only purpose of that is to help you to identify the charges better on your monthly JACS account. Now at this point you CIS has been created and if you click at the bottom left on “View” or “Print CIS”, you’ll see a draft of your CIS form. This is a PDF. You can look at it, you can save it, you can print it. You don’t have to look at it at all if you don’t want to. And if you do, once you’ve viewed it, you can just close it and it will
go back to that previous screen. You’re going to hit “Continue” on the main screen and it’s going to give you a popup box. So this is a final step before submitting your complaint and this is a reminder of a couple of different things. One is that this document is
about to go into a public case jacket. So you need to make sure that it
contains what it needs to contain, both in terms of the data and in terms of the document itself. It can only be removed by court order. Now we’re doing that, because we want
the $50 for the motion to remove it. So I want to be very clear about why you need a court order to remove a document from e-Courts. As soon as this document goes in
the case jacket, it was viewable. It was viewable by somebody, somewhere and someone could have relied on that for some purpose. So in order to remove a document from this public record, you need a record that it was removed. So that’s why we’re doing that. So this is a reminder to you
every time you go to file a document, that this document is going to
become a public document in a moment and that it can only be removed by court order. There’s also in red a reminder to
you that refunds are not available once the document has been filed. If you’re OK with this, you click on “Yes”. And you’re going to get a confirmation. We’re on slide 36. It says in green that this document has been submitted and an email notification has been sent to you. It also gives you a little bit of information about your case. It gives the docket number, it
gives the caption, the case type, the track, the judge and the team that was assigned. And at the bottom it also tells you what the names of the documents are that were uploaded. Notice that in addition to the complaint, there’s a case information statement uploaded. That’s the one that e-Courts created for you. The date that it was entered
into e-Courts and the total payment. At this point you could view the case jacket if you want to and I’ll give you a preview of a case jacket in a moment. Or at the bottom right of the screen, since you’re now done with this
filing you can start a new case. So if you click to view the case
jacket, this is what it looks like, slide 37. I’m not going to go into any detail on this at all; I just wanted you to get a quick preview of it, because in just a moment Mark is going
to be going through the sections of it in much more detail. You’re also going to get an email notification. This is a little preview of what the email looks like. Again, Mark is going to go into this in some more detail, but just to let you know that this
notification is going to tell you, among other things, who was and was not electronically served. Again, for a complaint, no one was electronically served, because you’re the only one on the case, so complaints still must be served on paper. Yes? Audience: I’m sorry if you said this already. Does it, if you fail to, if your
balances dip below the minimum amount of your Collateral Account at the
time you’re trying to file something, will it deny the filing or will it file
it and then you’ll get a notification? Strom: Yeah, e-Courts will reject a
filing if your Collateral Account is too low. Audience: So what’s you fix? Because sometimes if you have a firm with multiple attorneys and your balance has dropped
below the minimum amount in one day and you’re filing at 7:00 o’clock, what are your alternatives? Strom: So you alternative is you have to go onto the JACS page on the website and reload. Audience: I’m not familiar, I haven’t ever loaded it myself. Is that something that’s available at all hours as well to do? Strom: It is. You can add money 24 hours to your JACS account. Any other questions about filing a complaint? All right. Mark is going to walk you through the case jacket. Talbot: OK. So case jacket in much more detail, right? Excruciating detail. So go back to this slide that I showed a little bit earlier, just a quick technical review of the case jacket. Again, it’s available to all attorneys. Documents are free to view; no issues there. Everything’s available in PDF. Again, anything prior to e-Courts
probably won’t be in there to start. And then all documents are public for now. One of the questions is how does
the public get to these case jackets? At this point in time, every county
should have public access terminals, so public can come in and look at
the case jackets on those terminals. Additionally, in the Hughes Justice
Complex, Superior Court Clerk’s Office has a pretty good number of public access terminals, people come in there and look at it as well. So this is what the case jacket looks like. Divided into three sections. First up at the top, you always
get that header, with the Help. We also show the docket number
that you’re currently looking at. The way you get to a case jacket
and a few different options there, the first is as Beth Ann showed at the end of a filing. You’ll have a little link to go in and view that case jacket. Second, on the email confirmations,
you’ll get a link to the case jacket. And third, you can go into the case
jacket, I’m not showing those screens today. You can do a search by docket number,
you can do a search by party name on a case and that’ll also get you to a case jacket. So here I am looking at it. My first main section at the
top is information about the case. It’s kind of global information. I see the caption, I see the court; we’re in Civil Part here. You will note that case jackets,
whether you’re looking at Civil, Criminal, elsewhere, all have the same look and feel. You’ll see the county, you’ll see the
case initiation date, when it was created, case type, status, whether
there’s a jury demand on it, case track, the judge assigned and the team assigned. Then we have a block of nine fields. What’s the original discovery end date? What’s the current discovery end date
and how many extensions have there been. What’s the original arbitration date? The current arbitration date and
the number of adjournments and lastly, the original trial date, current
trial date and the number of adjournments. This is real-time data. This is what the court is seeing internally. This is what our legacy applications
would have in them, this is across the board. Everyone’s looking at the same
information on the case at the same time. Our next section relates to our parties. And we have that broken up by tabs: plaintiffs, defendants. So here I’m looking at the
plaintiff’s tab and I’m looking at the top. I see there’s one plaintiff on this case. If there were more than one
plaintiff, more than one defendant, that number at the top would change. Then I’m looking at an individual. I see this is an individual as the, our description. I show that party’s address information. So if I added their address, if I added their phone number, all that would show up here. If I didn’t add it, it would be blank. I also get the attorney information. Now this is for a complaint we just electronically filed, so we’ll see that attorney. We’ll get their Bar ID and we’ll also get their email address. This makes it very easy if you need to
find somebody, you’ll see it right there. If there were multiple parties, you’ll see those twisties again Beth
Ann was talking about a few minutes ago, those little triangles. Click on those, those will expand individual parties, you can see their information. Now Beth Ann spent a while talking
about all the alternate names we can put in, whether it’s a full spell for somebody’s name or other alternate names doing business as. Any of those would be available. There’s a little “aka” you’ll see next to the name. Here I’m seeing an individual
name, but if I just hover over that, it would actually open up a little
window and list out all of those party names that have been added in for that party or alternate names. It makes it very easy to see anytime you want. Over on defendant, same information. Get the name up at the top, any
alternate names would be shown there. Get their description. This is a state agency here. I’d get that address, phone
number, whatever has been entered in as well as the attorney’s name, Bar ID and email addresses. So case information, party information, individual parties on that case and lastly the case actions. So as we move forward into
e-Courts, every action taken, every filing, every order, court notices are
getting put into that case action section. This kind of builds out over time. So in the example here, you’re
seeing we started with a complaint. We get a file date, a couple of icons there on that first row, I’ll return to in a minute. And that Docket Text, it says a
complaint was filed by this person on behalf. That gives us just a very quick synopsis of what happened. An order was signed by a judge. A motion was filed on behalf of. All that’s put in there. That’s the same stuff you’re going
to see on your email notifications and it’s automatically generated by the system. Every time you file, the court signs an order, automatically creates that Docket Text, you don’t have to type anything in, auto-generated. Transaction ID is next to that. Every filing, every time you hit
“Submit” gets a unique Transaction ID, so we can always trace your filing back into the system. Again, if you have a technical problem, give us a call. You have that number. The vicinages can also look up
individual filings by Transaction ID. And lastly, Entry Date. We talked about the ability to backload older documents or something comes in by pro se, maybe it was stamped “file today”
but we didn’t backload it for a while. So you can see a difference there between the entry date, when it made it into the system
and when it was originally filed. It’s a lot of information we just covered. A lot of case information, party information, then the individual actions on the case. We give you the option in the upper
right-hand corner to create a summary report. Very simple. You click on that and it’ll actually create a quick PDF and list out all that information. You can save that off somewhere; it’s a great reference. You could print it if you wanted to. Just makes it very easy to refer
back to what’s going on with that case. So back to those icons I skipped over. Yes? Audience: Quick question. When you file, say a complaint,
and you get your email notification, if someone files an answer, do you
get an email saying an answer was filed? Talbot: So if you filed a complaint, right? That goes in, automatically creates a case jacket, all that attorney information’s there. Subsequently someone files an answer electronically. You’re on the case, it knows who you are, it’s going to automatically send you a notification. Audience: You no longer have to
serve your adversary paper copies? Talbot: If you’re filing an answer and
your adversary has electronically filed it, all hooked up to the case, then you would be good. And Beth Ann’s actually going to show some screens in a bit where you would see where it
would tell if you still had to serve. So our two icons. Here pretty self-explanatory. First is a paper clip and we’ll start with that. Those are for the attachments. These are the documents that were attached in that filing. You’ll get a little popup and as Beth Ann talked about, it can be easier if you break out
documents, break out the individual exhibits. They’re all listed out. You can click on one or you can select all of them in one shot and see them in one PDF. When you open up a document, it shows up and up at the top, this is the official blue stamp, blue strip if you will. This replaces the old-fashioned stamps on all the documents. So if you want to know, is this document
official, did the court really receive it? That stamp up at the top is what tells you it’s in our system. It’s official. It gives you your docket number. You’ll immediately get that back on your documents. It shows the date and time down to
the second, when the system received it, page one of four, two of four, so you can’t lose any pages and lastly, the Transaction ID, you can always trace back to that individual filing. So all you would do is click on a document. It would open up the PDF and you would see it. The second icon is an envelope. This is for notifications. So we actually store a copy of the
email notifications in the system, so you always know what went out. We actually send two notifications; one is on e-filing. That’s your confirmation email. That’s where you would get something
back immediately that says you filed this, here’s the documents you attached,
here’s the filing fees, etcetera. All that’s there. And the other is notification to all the parties on the case. So we’re looking at the notification
that’s for all the parties on the case. For any e-Courts users now, how often do you find it takes to get that notification? Seconds? Seconds. I saw a snap of a finger. That’s good. So it should be that quick that
you’re getting that right back. That’s good. If it takes longer than that,
something’s wrong with the mail server. So looking though that, you’ll see up
at the top, somebody filed something, the plaintiff, the defendant,
the case caption, the case number, all that information’s coming
out on every single notification. The Docket Text is there as well. And then, key parts Beth Ann mentioned I believe before, if someone was notified electronically, you’ll see that listed out and where they were notified. If someone was not notified
electronically, it will list that as well, which means they would need to have been served on paper. So again, that notification’s out
there on every e-filing, orders, etcetera. The actual email, a little bit better
than the copy we have in the case jacket. This gives you links, so you will be able to click on
one of those links to the case jacket and go immediately in and see those documents or click on the individual document
link and it’ll open that up immediately. All right. Any questions on the case jacket? Audience: [inaudible 1:17:46.5] I’m really at a loss at how that can happen [inaudible 1:17:55.7] so somewhere really, the Civil Division, somebody’s making these decisions and I’m just wondering how that happens [inaudible 1:18:03.5]. I mean, it doesn’t happen often; it’s happened twice in a year. Talbot: So this is someone who’d be
not an attorney getting notification? Audience: My client. Talbot: Oh, OK. Yeah, we can talk
about that offline if that’s all right, but that’s a good question, yeah. All right. Yeah, we can try that. So deficiencies. This is something that can happen
if you upload a menu, your resume, something like that. The system’s not going to
scream, we just take it as a document, but if it comes into the court, someone’s reviewing it. They can actually, on the court side, send a deficiency out. That’s just a quick note to parties on the case, also an entry in the case site, there’s a deficiency. They get to describe that deficiency,
so you know what you need to cure that. And then they can submit subsequent filings as needed. Yes? Audience: Do you have the ability to
screen with, before, when you review, you review these, do you see the
name of what you think you’ve attached. Is there the ability to click on
it and then see if it’s in fact what you intended to attach, so
you don’t have to have a deficiency? Talbot: Sure. Great question. If I’m uploading an attachment,
right after I click on “Upload”, I’m attaching it and I do a
browse, it actually turns it into a link. And I went back to slide 32 and
you’ll actually see it says “Complaint” with a little blue underline. You can click on it, it’ll pop open the PDF. Look at it, verify and if you don’t like it, there’s a trash can to the left and you can upload it again. So again, deficiencies if there’s a problem. Clerk’s notices. It could be a variety of reasons. They just want to get some
information out to all the parties on a case, you might see those coming out as well with the notifications. Audience: Is there a way to fix that deficiency from here or do you have to wait and file something? Talbot: You would need to follow the instructions on the deficiency through refiling. The case jacket is simply an inquiry view. We don’t allow you to do any data entry through case jacket; just looking at the system at this point. I’m going to turn it back over to
Beth Ann for responsive pleadings. Strom: All right. I’m going to walk you through the filing of an answer, it should look very familiar to you very quickly. So you start after logging in with this home screen. And here, though, you’re going to
select “Enter a, Search an Existing Case”, which is at the top of the screen. So you’re going to put in the venue and the docket number. Notice after the docket number there’s a little question that you can answer yes or no to, asking if you want to submit the filing to other cases. This would probably be most useful if you were filing something to consolidated cases. For example, the same motion to one
or more cases that were consolidated. If you click “Yes” here, which
we’re not going to show you here, but if you clicked “Yes” it would give you a dropdown and you
would put in those other docket numbers. But here we’re filing an answer on a single case and so we leave it to the default of “No” and then we’re going to click on “Search”. Here you’re going to see a lot of the information that’s already existing for the case. And again, this allows you to
confirm that you’re in the right case, this is the right caption, this is
where you want to file your answer. And at the bottom, select “Filing Type”. So there are two dropdown boxes. The first is the Filing Type. So Filing Type is just broad categories and this is because there’re so
many types of documents you can file. We don’t want you to have to scroll down through drop boxes, so we give you a Filing Type. Filing Types are such things as
responsive pleading, which we’ve selected here, motion related, which you’re going to see in a moment, post-judgment documents and a few other broad categories. There’s only a few categories. But once you select that Filing Type, then the dropdown to the right will
give you all of the available types of documents that pertain to that generic category. So here we’re going to just select “Answer”, but there may have been, for example, an answer with a counterclaim or an
Answer with a third-party complaint or both or all of the various permutations of
answers that you can choose from here. And once you’ve done that,
you’re going to click on “Continue”. So again, for an answer, as with a
complaint, e-Courts creates the CIS for you. And so, you’re going to answer a lot of those questions that are relevant to the CIS. A little bit different here, because you are going to know whether
you have a counterclaim, cross-claim, third-party claim, a few other questions are different. The format’s a little bit different, but it’s all the same that you need for the CIS form. And so, complete that section. And then at the bottom you’re going to
select who the filing party or parties are and who the, who the parties
are that you’re filing against. In this case, we only have one plaintiff and one defendant, but the defendant is going to
select the checkbox for “Movant”, that’s what e-Courts calls the
filing party and then for the plaintiff, “Adversary” in this case. Notice that there are, the names of the
parties are in blue with an underline. You can click on those and get
information about those parties. And to the right of that the question “Special Accommodations” and here, if you click on this,
you can see any interpreter requests or any other accommodations that have been requested for the party by previous filers or you can request accommodations
here if you need to for your party. Yes? Audience: Let’s say that I
needed an interpreter of some language and I don’t have that in my initial filing. Can I go back in and see if special accommodations are made? Strom: You can go back. If you omitted accommodations, you can go back in later, but can you only do it through a filing? Yeah, you have to do it through a
filing that you’re submitting, though. So once you’ve answered all of the
questions and you’ve selected the parties, requested accommodations or interpreter as needed, you can go ahead and click “Continue”. And this is going to bring you a popup, which is new. You didn’t see this for a complaint. But for any document other than a complaint, you’re going to get a popup box
and this is your first notification as to who e-Courts is going to serve
electronically or rather, who it’s not. So this box is going to show you who
you’re going to have to serve on paper. Now just suspend what I showed you with the complaint, because we already know the
complaint was electronically filed, but we’re going to, for the purpose of demonstrating this, assume that that complaint had been filed on paper and the plaintiff then in this
case would have to be served on paper, because they had not entered an appearance in e-Courts. So just for the purpose of
illustration we’re showing you that. And you can click “Continue”. In the next screen, you’re going to go ahead and upload
the documents, document or documents. The answer obviously is a required document. If you have other documents that
you’re going to submit with the answer, you can click on the blue plus sign
and go ahead and add them as well. And then at the bottom of the
screen where the fee information is, you’re going to go ahead and select that. In this example and I told you before, we were going to show you what
happens if the filer is exempt from fees. And so, we have that checkbox selected and you can see to the right there’s a dropdown box. Below that, all of the boxes are
greyed out for the payment type, the Collateral Account number and so
forth and to the left at the bottom, the filing fee is zero, because this
filer was exempt from the filing fee. So from here you go ahead and continue. You can view the CIS if you like,
just as you did with the complaint. Again, it’s a PDF, you can look at it, you can print it, you can save it or you can just skip by it; it doesn’t matter. And once you have viewed that, if
you wanted to, when you close it, you’re going to click “Continue”. And again, as with the complaint,
you’re going to get this final warning box; the final warning that once you hit “Submit” this document is going to go to a case jacket, it’s going to be a public record that
can only be removed by a court order and also the filing fee, if any, is nonrefundable. So if you’re OK with this, you can go ahead and click “Yes”. And you’re going to get a confirmation
message as you did with the complaint. This document has been successfully submitted. A notification was sent to you by email and in fact, and those of you who are already
working in e-Courts in Special Civil or Foreclosure, you know that
this usually happens very quickly. It does again show you a transaction ID at the bottom. It shows what documents were uploaded,
the date that it was entered in e-Courts and the filing fee, if any. At this point you could view the case jacket if you wanted to. The answer is in there. You could click at the bottom for a new
case and you can start a new document. Any questions about responsive pleadings? They’re pretty straightforward. The last document type we want to show you is a motion filing and this begins on slide 64. Again, assuming that you’re at the home page, you’re going to search on an existing case. You’re going to put in the venue and the docket number. If this is going to go to more than one
docket number, you’re going to click “Yes” and then go ahead and search. As with the answer, you’re
going to see some basic case details and then at the bottom of the screen you’re going to select a filing type or category. Here, “Motion Related”. And then the dropdown box to the
right of that is going to show you all of the possible motion types that you can select. The category is Motion Related for a reason, because not only would you file a motion from here, you would file an opposition, a reply brief, etcetera and all of those are available
options in the second dropdown box. So you’re going to select the
type of motion that you’re filing and click on “Continue”. On the next screen you’re going to
select who the moving party or parties are and the adversary or adversaries and again, this same availability of being able
to see information about the parties or about accommodations or requests for a translator. Audience: If you’re filing, you are the movant? Strom: If you’re filing, you are the movant. So e-Courts always calls the filer the movant and the party you’re filing against as the adversary. So once you’ve selected the movant and adversary, you’re going to click on “Continue”. Here you’re going to upload the documents. We tried to help you out here and prepopulate some documents that you may want to upload. So here for the motion, the Notice of Motion is required, the certification in support of the motion is required. They’re both PDF documents and the proposed form of order is required as a Word document. Other types of documents may be attached. Some of them you know that you need to
have, but we’re not listing it as required, because we know that some firms have templates and they combine certain sections of a
motion, so we give you some flexibility. So just because it’s not marked as
required, you know what you need to submit. And the court staff will review it and if there’s a problem, they’ll give you a deficiency
or Clerk’s note and let you know. You can also add other documents
by clicking on the blue plus sign. So for example, you would add exhibits here. At that point if you’re going to add a
document that we don’t have something prepopulated for you, you have to type in the document name. But other than that, just upload it as usual. There are a couple of questions that are specific to motions, so you have to state whether or not you want oral argument, yes, no or if opposed, whether or not, sorry, my vision is awful. I know, I can’t read anything
and I’ve done this a million times. Whether or not it’s a
cross-motion and the proof of service date. So for an e-filed document, particularly
if all of your adversaries being served are going to be served
electronically, that would be today’s date. But it does give you the opportunity if you’re going to be serving anybody on another date, you can go ahead and put, I guess the date of the last party
that you’re expecting to be served. And also you have the opportunity
to put the date that you’re asking for a return date. This would be the same date that
you have on your notice of motion. The reason that we ask you to put
this here is because the court staff on the other side can easily see what date you’re asking for without having to open the document. If that date is available, if
there’s no reason why you can’t have it as in the paper world, they’re going
to go ahead and give you that date. If not, you will get a notification if the date is not the same return date that you requested. You will go ahead and enter the fee information. If your client’s exempt from the filing fee, you’ll click on that and select a reason. Otherwise, e-Courts has calculated what the fee is based on the document that you said you were filing. You’re going to select your Collateral Account and continue. Audience: If you say no, will it allow you to make changes? Strom: If you say no, it will allow
you to go back and make changes, yes. So again, you’re going to get the popup box, “This document is going to become a
public record as soon as you submit it”, so it can only be removed by a court
order and the filing fee is nonrefundable. So when you’re comfortable with
that, you’re going to click “Yes”. You get the confirmation screen. “This document has been successfully submitted. An email notification has been sent to you.” And again, at the bottom of the screen
it’s going to give you your transaction ID, which is also going to be in the
email and in the notifications, the documents that were uploaded, the date that it was entered into e-Courts and the filing fee. And at this point you can view the case jacket or you can click “New Case” to start another filing. Audience: I have a question. Strom: Yes. Audience: Within a complaint, you
get an answer and you did a motion. What if you needed to file, say a
letter to the judge or something? Does that get filed in here or does that go by mail? Strom: So all documents that you
would normally file with the court can be filed in e-Courts. We’re only showing you the big three. Audience: But there would be some kind of a place in there ? Strom: Yes, so there’s a category for miscellaneous documents and something like a
correspondence to the court would be there. So I just want to say in conclusion that we are continually looking at enhancements to e-Courts. We’re adding functionality as Mark said. It’s not a finished product. We put out something that works and we
want to just keep making it work better. There are a lot of people involved in
determining policy, procedures, enhancements. We list for you a few of the groups of people in the Judiciary that are involved in this. And as you can see, there are quite a lot of groups. Audience: How do we make a suggestion if we have one? Strom: So if you have a suggestion and your feedback is very important to us as well and we’ve taken a lot of feedback from the Bar to make improvements and
enhancements, so if you have a suggestion, please reach out to Mary, your Civil Division Manager. Oh, there’s her card and she’ll get that, she’ll get that to us and we’ll work on it. All right. Any other questions or comments. Thank you very much. Braunschweiger: Thank you all for coming. [Applause]

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