Civil service exam takers on steady rise… A move to prevent future uncertainties?

Civil service exam takers on steady rise… A move to prevent future uncertainties?


The economic state of the country has seen
big companies hire fewer new workers than they have in the past. In response, more young jobseekers are looking
for work with the government. Oh Jung-hee reads into the trend. Korean college grads have traditionally applied
for jobs at big conglomerates,… but now a growing number want to work for the government. A recent poll by online job search portal
JobKorea showed… four in ten jobseekers in their twenties or thirties have prepared
to take the civil service exam. The number exam takers has steadily risen,…
last year hitting an all-time high of more than 700-thousand. Reflecting the trend, students at one of the
hundreds of private institutes in Seoul’s Noryangjin neighborhood are all gathered with
the same goal in mind: entering the civil service. So why the craze for government jobs? “I didn’t have many career choices with my
university major. And I thought the civil service isn’t bad,
considering the job security and pension.” “I wake up at about five and come to this
institute by seven. We study on our own until 9, and take classes
until one. It is tiring, but still, I want to be a civil
servant.” At a time of low economic growth,… they’re
attracted by job security and flexible working systems. The annual pay of Korea’s civil servants has
risen every year since 2013, regardless of the state of the economy. Plus, it’s commonly understood there’s little
threat of being laid off or overworked. Maternity leave and flexible working systems
are well instituted, and a pension virtually guaranteed. “I would definitely say more students have
been registering for courses here. And to satisfy greater demand, we’ve also
put more course online.” One expert says the growing interest in the
civil service is a potential problem… because it could signal a loss of economic vitality. “It’s generally the private sector that powers
the economy. So, a concentration of working-age people
in the public sector would mean less creativity and less energy in the economy.” The expert added… that, while it could be
a temporary measure to absorb workers that the private sector has not been able to,…
the government should also offer incentives to private companies to boost their hiring…
in order to revitalize the economy and bring about fresh innovation from young people. Oh Jung-hee, Arirang News.

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