Dutch Citizens Adopt Graves at Netherlands American Cemetery

Dutch Citizens Adopt Graves at Netherlands American Cemetery


Netherlands American Cemetery located in between
Maastricht and Margraten is the only American Cemetery in the country. This is where 8,301
of our fallen troops from World War II lay to rest. But there is one significant thing
that makes this cemetery standout from all others.
We’re the only cemetery in the entire organization, the ABMC, we have 24 cemeteries, where 100
percent of our graves have been adopted by local families. And these families, actually
the entire region feel so grateful still to this day that they adopt the graves and treat
these soldiers as if they are their own family. And adopting one of these graves isn’t as
easy as you would think. There’s a waiting list where several people who have already
signed up before you, just waiting to pay tribute to those who have fallen. And for
those who have already adopted one. They come out two, three, four times a year.
They put flowers on the graves and they make a point of learning and researching as much
as they can about the soldier as possible so they can feel that connection.
They love coming out and taking the time out of their day, just to say “Thank You.” Army
Sergeant Joshua Blair, Netherlands American Cemetery.

Comments

  1. Post
    Author
    Herman Wolters

    I have adopted the grave of pvt Harry Green from the 17th airborne division.
    And I hope to find his familie, just to tell them that his grave is well taking care of.

  2. Post
    Author
    American Battle Monuments Commission

    Thanks @Isidorus Hispalensis. Many of our other sites are also supported by local adoption programs. We have citizens that honor our fallen by laying flowers and visiting these eternal resting places.  

  3. Post
    Author
  4. Post
    Author
    larry Bak

    an we americans all need to learn from this. our brave are taken better care of over there then here. i think im going to have to adopt a grave in my hometown of a World War II Soldier my father served in World War Il. I think it would make him proud anyways.

  5. Post
    Author
    Scott Smith

    I have an uncle buried there. I can't say enough about the American Battle Monuments Commission, The Faces of Margraten, or the helpful people of the Grave Adoptions. This grave site should get much more attention than it does.

  6. Post
    Author
  7. Post
    Author
    MrBobman1966

    i doubt anyone will see this but thats ok.. Just wanted to say Thank You to the people who take the time from their schedules to honor our men there. God Bless You All.

  8. Post
    Author
    abdelkaderelbrazi

    My gilrfriend's family adopted the grave of 2 Lt. Frederice T. Flodberg from the 402nd Fighter Squadron. What the video says about the attitude of the locals towards the liberators is so true. We've conducted a full research to find out as much as we could about him and we even tried to get in touch with the Flodberg family but it didn't work out. My girlfriend's mother has tons of books about the war, about the involvement of the US troops, etc.
    I'm Polish and even though the Americans didn't liberate my country, it doesn't stop me from feeling grateful for their sacrifice. To me, the very fact that I'm now allowed to live in the Netherlands, in a FREE COUNTRY, is a reason big enough to feel like this. It's all thanks to them. We owe them and will never be able to pay this debt back.
    We always return to Margraten with a big lump in our throats. My girlfriend and I have promised to take care of lieutenant Flodberg's grave in the future, when her family can't do it anymore. It will be an honor and a privilege.

    P.S. One thing that really made me cry was when we were walking between the graves last year, until we found one cross with a flower and a short note: "Remembering and loving you on Father's Day. Your Kathleen." It's so amazing to know that the graves are visited not only by the locals but also by the families of the fallen soldiers. It probably cost them a lot of effort and money to come to the Netherlands to pay their tribute, but they do it anyway.

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