Just the Job – Civil Engineer

Just the Job – Civil Engineer


Jayden: Kia ora, I’m Jayden from Riccarton
High School and today I’m going to be checking out career path in civil engineering. Clinton: To find out what a Civil Engineer
does, we’re at SCIRT – an Acronym for Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team… Clinton: …showing Jayden around is SCIRT
Training Manager, Mason Tolerton. Mason: I hear you’re interested in a career
in civil? Jayden: Yeah mate. Mason: Excellent, well we’ve got a busy
day planned for you – let’s have a look round. Duncan: This organisation that is SCIRT is
a virtual organisation that’s been created specifically to deliver the rebuild of the
damaged infrastructure – the horizontal infrastructure we call – in Christchurch
after the earthquake events of 2010 and 2011. Duncan: What I’m talking about is the water
supply – the potable water network, the sewage and waste water network, the storm
water and drainage, and then the roads, with the associated structures like bridges and
retaining walls and that sort of stuff. Mason: So we’ve got 20 different organisations
represented here in this building alone. A lot of them are designers that you see here
doing the actual design work of the broken pipes, infrastructure, roads and figuring
out how that’s going to look when its repaired. Duncan: This organisation that is SCIRT is
actually pulled together under a head contract agreement and it’s an agreement between
three clients – Christchurch City Council, CERA and NZTA and five contracting companies,
so that’s Downer, City Care, Fletchers, Fulton Hogan and McConnell Dowell. Clinton: Matt Smith is currently working for
SCIRT as an Estimator. Matt: Hi Jayden. Jayden: Nice to meet you. Matt: Come and have a look at what we do. Jayden: Sweet. Mason: So what Matt does is use his experience
and knowledge that he’s got as a site engineer, working on site on projects, estimate what
the cost will be for work that needs to be done for SCIRT so that then gets sent out
to the delivery teams and gets maximum value to the people of Christchurch and the government. Clinton: Matt has just completed the New Zealand
Diploma in Engineering Practice in conjunction with Connexus, the Industry Training Organisation
for the Infrastructure Industry…. Jayden: And how did you get into it? Matt: So when I left college, I was working
with my uncle for Downers, in a civil site… Jayden: Yep. Matt: …I knew that I could do training,
get a form of education, plus gain knowledge of the civil industry, which I enjoy. Clinton: Downer offered Matt a Cadetship allowing
him to learn and earn at the same time. Matt: It took me four years, but with the
right discipline and attitude and mentoring, it can take you about two and a half years. Clinton: And it’s not just a job for the
boys – many women now enjoy rewarding careers in civil engineering. Lindsay: So NZDEP is qualification whilst
they’re employed, and therefore they’re earning as they progress through that qualification.
The NZDE is aligned with the Dublin Accord so wherever you work in the work, as a Dublin
Accord qualification, then that is recognisable. Clinton: Robert Jefferson is a Site Engineer.
He relocated from the UK to work on the Christchurch rebuild. Jayden: So what have you just finished here? Robert: So it’s part of the rebuild work
for Christchurch… Jayden: Yep. Robert: …we’ve been replacing the waste
water pipes… Jayden: Yep. Robert: As a site engineer my responsibilities
and roles include managing site crews, looking after health and safety, take and understanding
for the technical aspect of what we’re building and able to communicate that onto the crews
to deliver the project. Jayden: I hear you’ve got a bit of an accent,
so where are you from? Robert: I’m originally from East London,
I came over here for work and to travel at the same time… Jayden: Oh yep. Robert: …which is a benefit of engineering,
because it can take you around the world and open up doors for you. Robert: I came to Christchurch as the next
step for my career to contribute towards the earthquake recovery. You’ve got a unique
opportunity here to help out with something that’s significant, not just nationally
but internationally. Duncan: Civil engineering as a career is a
good platform to travel, and because you’ve got these skills that are skills that people
want, you can work overseas, so it’s a good way to go. Clinton: Across town, Duncan Henderson, A
Graduate Engineer, is planning the Rebuild of Anzac Drive Bridge.
Duncan: So at the moment it’s a four lane bridge with the pedestrians on the far side… Jayden: Yep. Duncan: …and yeah so basically what you’ve
already seen, the abutments were quite badly damaged. We’re just going to do some surveying
on top of the bridge. Duncan: So Jayden, this is Reid… Jayden: Hi. Duncan: …he’s our survey cadet, he’s
going to help us today with the surveying that we need to do. Reid: We’ll start with the GPS, so this
kind of consists of – you’ve got your controller… Jayden: Yep. Reid: And this is like your receiver, so there’s
24 satellites rotating around the earth, so this things picks up as many as it can, like
sometimes it’s as high as 18, so yeah, right now its picking up six satellites. Reid: So moving on from the GPS, this is called
a Total Station, so this is very accurate, it goes down to about mm but its all based
on your setup, so this thing works a little bit differently – it doesn’t have a GPS
so you have to tell this where it is, like you have to tell it it’s position. Reid: This, it shoots a laser out and into
this it reflects the prism and shoots back so this thing can calculate the distance,
it’s a pretty cool piece of gear Duncan: When I finished high school I was
trying to decide between architecture and graphic design and engineering and I ended
up deciding I wanted the more scientific maths-based background of engineering. As I found out
more about what civil engineering was I realised it was exactly what I wanted to do. Being
able to build things like this is pretty cool. Duncan: I like to think of engineers as “social
innovators” – we need to find more and better ways to do things for the community.
Everything we do is actually for the community, so you become more socially aware of the role
of an engineer, which is bigger than just building stuff. Mason: I think Jayden’s done really well
– he’s been really enthusiastic about looking at the different opportunities in
the engineering careers space and he’s got a really good work ethic, he’s working hard
at school and that’s going to pay off for him later on when he has to do some of the
more theoretical sides of the job. So it looks promising for Jayden. Jayden: I enjoyed the experience, it was really
cool to meet a bunch of new people, it was cool to see how the rebuild in Christchurch
is going on. Would I do the job? Absolutely! I love to help out the people of Christchurch
and watch the rebuild as it’s happens over the next couple of years. Clinton: The New Zealand Diploma in Engineering
Practice recognises practical skills and is achieved on the job. Training is available
through Connexus, the Industry Training Organisation for the infrastructure industry. There is
a recognised pathway to gaining the qualification. Students need a minimum of 48 NCEA Level 2
credits to study for the New Zealand Diploma in Engineering. Once the New Zealand Diploma
in Engineering qualification has been achieved you can enrol in the New Zealand Diploma in
Engineering Practice. Together both qualifications provide a pathway to professional registration
with the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand. Civil Infrastructure Engineering
is an ideal career if you enjoy problem solving. Skilled engineers are in high demand and the
Diplomas are recognised internationally.

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