Surviving the Holocaust: Segment 3 — Isolating Jews from Society

Surviving the Holocaust: Segment 3 — Isolating Jews from Society


>>Narrator: Nazi practices included a systematic
removal of all Jewish influences. Jewish businesses were marked and patrons were
discouraged from entering. Irene’s father lost his lumber business because it was
seized outright by the Nazis with no compensation. Jewish citizens were
suddenly forced to prove their citizenship in Hungary. To prove it they
had to have Nazi-approved documents and the Nazis made those documents difficult
to obtain. Jews who couldn’t prove Hungarian citizenship were deported. >>Mrs. Weiss: Even
though my parents and grandparents were citizens they put on every kind of
handicap possible. My father actually spent a lot of time trying to acquire
that by going from office to office and paying for everything. And and eventually
he, he got the paper. It was, I remember it was, they were almost
celebrating. He came back with that paper “okay we’re safe.” Every step of the way,
from the time this happened until we ended up in Auschwitz, we always
rationalized for the better; always thinking that “okay it’s getting worse
but we see some light” you know. People just can’t accept the worst. And so here
we had this paper and we’re safe. Except they’ll make, don’t show yourself in the
street you know. Don’t, uhm, get involved with the law in any way
because they won’t protect you. Nobody was safe. Even school kids, younger ones
than in high school, say, “I have my rights”, you know you hear that in classroom. Well
what if you don’t have any rights and the police are on the other side. They
they don’t protect you, they stand by while people do you harm or take out anything
from your home. It’s a very difficult concept that we were guilty of something,
we were guilty of being alive. Just by virtue of being a Jew, you were hunted.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *