TfL Safety and Citizenship – Junior Citizenship Schemes

TfL Safety and Citizenship – Junior Citizenship Schemes


Right now we’re at the Hackney Museum and we’re learning about all different types of ways to stay safe. The Junior Citizenship Scheme brings several agencies across London together to explain to Year Six pupils some of the important things they need to know about being a 10 or 11 year-old in London. – Smoking: good idea or bad idea? – Smoking: good idea or bad idea?
– Bad idea! – Okay… What’s amazing is to have an experience, for me and for the kids, where it’s one session where they’re learning so many things about being decent, responsible London kids. – You guys need to be strong; you need to be leaders, not followers. This morning we’ve got a group coming from a Special Educational Needs school. So we’re adapting our format slightly so we can take longer to go through key mesages. I would say that Transport for London have been fantastic in meeting the needs of our students and in tailoring the activities for their particular needs. It’s just great to see the students participating so actively and, you know, really getting involved. The events are varied. Some are indoors, some are outdoors, some split between the two. So, for example, we’ve got our vehicles that we can use outdoors which gives a bit more space. Because we’re quite adaptable with how we deliver, it means that wherever we’ve got, we can still deliver the safety messages, we can still get there, and get the messages to the kids for free and in that borough, and that’s what’s really important. Everyone uses public transport in London and we want to make sure that everyone knows how to be safe on the network and so the Safety and Citizenship team is able to deliver its programmes in a way that meet the various needs of the diverse audiences across London. If a school’s really worried about how the programme is going to turn out, I would say that they get in touch with TfL, they have a meeting before the programme starts and I’m sure that their worries will be taken into consideration to tailor the programme to their needs. – There are eight different activities taking place this afternoon. Time we got started. About half the kids in Year Six are dropped off by parents and carers. In secondary school I think that’s going to go up a lot more. – Here we are on the platform. I’m not standing in a great place though. Really what a day like this is going to do is prepare these kids to make that transition and use public transport, to use it sensibly and to make them better people for it, ultimately. – Do we go through these doors?
– No! The presentations are really helpful because they’re led by members of the community; by police officers and members of the Fire Brigade. They are the real messages, it’s not just me passing on things. I see it as a way of speaking to young people and trying to show us, as police officers, in a positive light. They make it real for the kids in a way that they can really understand. I had no idea that an Underground train could weigh as much as a blue whale. Sessions like this can really help them to become mature, sensible people. If I’m sitting down and I see someone elderly or
pregnant, now I’ll always give up my seat, We’ll definitely be bringing Year Six back again next year.
I think our parents really value it and the children really get a lot out of it.
So, yeah, definitely.

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