The Academic Library’s Role in Promoting Open Access Monographs

The Academic Library’s Role in Promoting Open Access Monographs


Good afternoon everyone my name is Mark
Derks and on behalf of ACRL and Choice I’d like to welcome you to today’s
program, “21st Century Book: The Academic Library’s Role in Promoting Open Access
Monographs” which is sponsored by EBSCO. Today’s discussion is one in a series of
sponsored webinars from ACRL and Choice that addresses new ideas, developments
and products of interest to the academic library community. Free to users, these structured,
60-minute, live presentations provide the opportunity for interactive discussions
of important new issues and developments in academic librarianship by librarians,
vendors, authors and other interested stakeholders. Before we get started I’d like to point
out a few features of the webinar software. In the main area of the screen
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program will be recorded and all registrants will receive follow up
instructions on how to access the archived version. Our speakers today are
Charles Watkinson, Dr. Rupert Gatti, and Michael Zeoli. Charles Watkinson is
associate university librarian for publishing at the University of Michigan
Press and director of the University of Michigan Press. He has extensive experience in scholarly
publishing and in library publishing collaborations with both university
presses and scholarly societies. He recently served as director of the
Purdue university press and head of scholarly publishing services in Purdue
University Libraries. His previous positions include director of
publications of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens and general
manager of the David Brown book company. As the umbrella entity for publishing
activities in the University of Michigan, Michigan publishing is exploring a range
of business models for open access books among them Lever Press,
Knowledge Unlatched and Digital Culture Books. Common themes are a desire to
avoid models that disenfranchise authors who are unable to pay and to
employ open access funding models strategically to advance authors’
ambitions around extended impact. Our next speaker will be Dr. Rupert
Gatti who is an academic, and director of studies in economics at Trinity College
in Cambridge. He is also a co-founder of the
award-winning open access publisher Open Book Publishers, publishing rigorously
peer-reviewed open access monographs across the full range of active academic
discipline and leading the way in innovative and multimedia digital
publications. OBP has now published over seventy five titles, including works by
early career scholars as well as renowned authors such as Noam Chomsky,
Amartya Sen, and former UK prime minister Gordon Brown. Operating as a regulated
non-profit company and publishing around 24 titles annually, OBP does not require any publication
payment by authors or their institutions, relying instead on the sales of printed
works, voluntary publishing grants, and membership fees from over 80 supporting
academic libraries to sustain their operations. Our final presenter today
is Michael Zeoli, who has worked at YBP since 1997 with a brief pause as
director of e-content development at ebrary he publishes regularly in journals and
organizes professional forums in which publishers and librarians are able to
discuss perspective. He is often included in conference panels including the
Charleston conference, the Association of American University Presses, Independent
Publishers Guild, and the Frankfurt Book Fair. Before joining YBP, Michael worked in
the acquisitions department at the Regenstein library at the University of
Chicago. At this point we’re ready to get started so I’ll turn the floor over to
you, Charles. Thank you very much Mark, and it’s
a pleasure to be here. So, I’m talking today as a publisher, as director of
University of Michigan Press and also as a librarian, and I’d like to start by just asking the question, “Why
do monographs matter?” And the reason for doing this is I think
there’s a a a narrative out there which is that monographs are the books that people
don’t read, and they’re produced primarily so authors can get promotion
and tenure, and I think that’s an important narrative to dismiss at the
start of this presentation, because scholars tell us that monographs really
matter to them. Both as authors and as readers, and I
have a couple of references on this slide that suggests that dual value. The
first reference is from a report by Michael Elliot from Emory University, and
it was recently published in the Journal of Electronic Publishing, and the emphasis
there is clear not simply because of the monograph’s
role in tenure and promotion decisions is it valuable. The second report is from the Higher
Education Funding Council of England from the noted historian Jeff
Crossick. And here he emphasizes that thinking through and writing a
monograph can help the author, and for readers the monograph offers specific
value in the area of inter-disciplinarity, so I just want to get that out there at
the start. The idea that monographs matter. So the
question starting from that premise is, now
turning to open access monographs, and the rest of this presentation really
looks at the question of “Why do open access monographs deserve library
support?” And if we believe that, how can we help support them? So I’d like
to make three arguments for open access monograph in descending order of
importance. The first reason why open access monographs deserve library support is because open access increases readership and
engagement in the public square, and that phrasing “in the public square” refers to
national endowment for the humanities’s articulation of the value of the
humanities for an educated citizenry and for people outside the specialist
parts of our universities. The fact that Humanities play a vital role
in public life. Open access monographs have the
potential to reach those citizens, people outside the subscription walls of our
institutions, and I’ve included a couple of examples of books that we at
University of Michigan Press have recently made open access, and quotes
from the people behind the books. Hybrid Justice is a book about the
extraordinary chambers in the courts of cambodia. It’s about justice and
legislation in Southeast Asia. The authors describe here how their goal
was to reach people in Southeast Asia to affect public policy in that part of the
world where there are very few people who can afford the prices of American
published books. Campaign Finance and Political Polarization is a book about
what it says on the cover–it’s about the role of our campaign finance in the
electoral cycle. It was funded by the Hewlett Foundation and here is a quote
from them. “The main reason we supported an open
edition was to promote civic engagement that improves representation by informing citizens about the work of Congress and candidates for its offices.”
So, promoting public engagement to me is very much about inclusion, diversity,
equity, and accessibility. Things that we care very much about as librarians. The
second reason why open access monographs are
such a good thing is because open access catalyzes new forms of digital
scholarship and learning. Here’s another example from the
University of Michigan Press, in our digital culture book series–and this is
an example which shows a certain type of digital scholarship that involves the
work of commenting, of building community, of bringing other people into a
conversation with a scholarly work. So, this is Ethical Programs, is the book,
and here you see the Hypothesis commenting tool turned on, and a group of
people using multimedia as well as text to comment on the work. The
scholars are engaged in a conversation with the book, something that would be
much harder to do–if not impossible– in a non-open-access environment. Thus the reason our for really
supporting open access monographs. And the least important to me is to do with
the economics of the monograph. This is an type of publishing which University
of Michigan Press has been very committed to over the years and as a
publisher with a requirement to sustain its operations majorly
through sales and licensing revenue, that commitment has cost us. This is a graph
that shows the last 10 years of sales for University of Michigan Press. And the Academic line reflects our monograph business. And you’ll see a decline in
revenue of almost fifty percent over that period of 10 years, and many of you
will be familiar with the reason for that. A really declining monograph budgets,
moves to employ new electronic aggregation models, which predate
on print sales, those things like demand-driven acquisition patron-driven
acquisition, short-term loan, etc. So, these are the three reasons why I think
open-access monographs deserve library support, and now i want to talk about
some of the strategies that librarians can use to support the growth of this
sector of publishing. Just in short, I think that they fall into three
categories: invest, curate, connect. So, what I mean by invest well one thing
to realize and acknowledge at the start is just how little funding the
Humanities disciplines receive. This is a graph from the american academy of arts
and sciences, and you’ll see that this is about research and development spending,
and the mark for the humanities is down there, just barely scraping the bottom of the
graph in red vs. medical sciences, high flying, right at the top. In an environment where we consider
open access from monographs a good thing and there is very little federal grant
support, and relatively little institutional support, where does the money come from? Well, you guessed it. It probably comes from libraries. And the
problem with monographs which is so different from journal publication is
that monographs are expensive to produce. And so it’s expensive for a single
library to fund an entire monograph cost although, as I’ll refer to later, there are
moves afoot from the Association of American Universities, from the
Association Research Libraries, the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, to
change the situation–to look at institutional funding for authors
who are on their faculties. However, these figures which reflect
actual cost of–direct direct cost of production. I’m including staff time and freelance costs for three of our books at University of Michigan Press, published
in 2014 and uh we participated at that time in this is ITHIKA study on the cost of
publishing a monograph, with which I think many of you will be familiar with. So, monographs are expensive to produce
and so library collaborate and this is being the primary way in which open
access monograph publishing in the United States has developed and here are
a number of collaborative enterprises involving libraries that are looking at
different models, collaboratively, to support monograph publishing. So, that’s the first way libraries can
help. The second way: I’ve used the term curate
to cover the various things that libraries and their partners in the
information supply chain do to add value to a published work. A what I want
to remind you here is of the very important role that our organizations
like EBSCO and Yankee Book Peddler play in ensuring that works are
discoverable, that they fit into library information supply chains, and of course
this is work that we’ve increasingly outsourced to such organization over the
past few years. And as the little hands exchanging money suggest, this is work
where those companies, which are commercial companies, they have to be
paid for the work that they’re doing to add value. And that information supply
chain could be expanded hugely, of course. Here it suggests, for example, that
preservation services like Portico have to be taken into consideration, but you
could also think of a number of other arrows going off for other value-added
services. Anytime there’s a value-add happening,
somebody needs to pay for it. In such an environment, who should pay for these value added
information supply chain services where there is no option to take a percentage
of a price to pay for those? they’re an open-access book there’s no
percentage of the price to take and recently it’s really started to be a conversation
about publishers bearing these costs but I would argue, perhaps controversially, that it’s really
important that libraries step up to also pay a portion of the cost for some of
these value-added services. Even if the content is free, it’s not
really free and just to illustrate the problem here
is a record from Coutts Oasis for one of our books that was included in the
Knowledge Unlatched program, and if you look at this slide, you’ll see are in the
purchasing module of Oasis, you’ll see that there are
all kinds of ebook options as well as print options, but if you look down this
list you will not see an open access version. So, how does this open access version get
into this conventional information supply chain that we all rely on? So, the
other part of this, that i think is very important, is also the question of how
does the open-access monograph get preserved? And here’s an example of the
Hathi Trust record. Knowledge Unlatched works with Hathi Trust to
preserve the open access books that it unlatches, but in the long term Hathi Trust probably needs to work out
a way of paying for this preservation service and other partners in the
preservation sphere, like Portico also need to … needs to find a
business model … They need to find a business model for this, and it’s only
going to get more and more difficult for these materials to be preserved as
digital scholarship products grow in number. So, I just noticed a question coming through
about the differences between the open monographic examples in the disparity in
costs to produce. I’d just like to say that one of the things to really remember is that
in the ITHAKA study, this is a cost to the first digital copy–to the
digital copy that would be used to print the book. So, one of the things to observe is that
there’s very little cost difference between the print book and the
digital copy that is used to produce it. looking at the disparaging cost between
those three volumes there are reasons of length. There are reasons of number of illustrations. There’s also a sort of embarrassing
little reason which is that some authors are easier to work with than others, and that explains the cost disparities. And you can learn more about that in the ITHAKA
report just referenced. And lastly I just want to say that I think there’s a third area
in which libraries can support open access monographs effectively, and
this is perhaps one of the most exciting areas and that is in terms of
developing the traditional role of librarians on campuses as glue people–as
people who connect our groups with each other. This is an area where the Lever Press
initiative has been particularly thoughtful, and i can say that as as a
participant in that initiative Lever Press is a publishing imprint that is
being created by a group of over 50 liberal arts colleges and it’s in
partnership with two established publishers Amherst College Press taking on
editorial leadership, and Michigan Publishing, of which University of Michigan Press is part, taking a kind of production and distribution lead, and here is Lever Press, created by this
partnership. For those libraries the themes of libraries and librarians in
those 50 plus liberal arts colleges they’re not just the funders of this
initiative, they play a determining role in the way in which this publishing
operation is shaped and in the way in which faculty are connected to it and
here are some examples of how librarians are working in a very integral way to
really power power the publishing that Lever Press is doing. So
finally, I just wanted to make a couple of
comments about the future of open access monographs, because I think this
is a quickly changing world which deserves all our attention. Trends
to watch: there’s a really interesting question, I
think this will resonate with many of you, that we’re facing at University of
Michigan library, in terms of the number of requests that are coming in for
support for open access publishing. In the monograph space, those are often quite small request for
their participation in library membership schemes, etc. but they do add
up. and now with the growth of Knowledge
Unlatched, for example, some of those requests are going to become much much
larger. So, previously they may have been
fundable out of a sort of a scholarly communications or discretionary
funds of various sorts, but increasingly there’s this big question about the role
of the materials budget interesting materials that are not of exclusive use
for the institution and the difficulty in defending that kind of our monetary
investment. I think that’s a very hot area, the
second thing is the increasing multimodality of publications things
which could not necessarily be reproduced in print and how that area of
innovation and digital scholarship will cross over into the
open access ebooks space particularly in the area of discovery one of the things currently happening is
that there may be a print copy of the book that can be discovered in the
information supply chain because that’s being sold but that at least will mean the title is in the catalog, even if the open access version is hidden, but what
about things that don’t have a print component? An extra level of problem is the discovery and preservation. And finally, in a world where impact is not measured
in terms of financial income, what are the new measures of that? Measures and indicators of impact we should be looking for, and how
do we aggregate and analyze, and communicate to authors, to funders, to publishers the impact of these new forms of
digital monographs so with that I’m ending. I see there are some interesting
questions coming up and i just wanted to say, “Is anyone working on a
single discovery source for open access monographs” is a very interesting
question. I think the answer is, “not yet,” but
there are some interesting moves afoot, such as the Muse-Open platform, and also
potentially the project which is called UP-Scope, which is
kind of a discovery system for University Press content, but with this I
will end my presentation thank you very much. Thank You, Charles. This is Mark stepping in to turn
things over to Dr. Gatti. i am very happy to have him up next. Thank you very much, and thank you all for attending the webinar, so i think Charles, Charles has hit an awful lot
of the thing that I agree with and a few things that I disagree with, so I’ll pick up on
some of those as we go along. I’ll at least put my flavor on them. I’ve got two hats, the one as an academic,
and the other is being involved in a start-up purely open access framework and so you know some of the advantages of that is that
we can look at digital publishing and publishing for the complete we can start
from a different base, and I think that’s something – I like to go on a
says is this continues so all just a scalar very very very
briefly i have introduction was here but open book publishers I way we publish academic lakes at do it
they’re the link there if anybody wants to go through and have a look at the
side of the plate of salad them and as I’m talking and we let you know lots of
books and they’re all free access of all they’re all available there I so do feel free to tell me what the
side if I had done talking here and i think this was all given an introduction
but we’ve got about 80 titles now we come up to me and I reader online free
readers is is we expect in the next month I think it’s like to point out that you
know this but the brit of our readership that you get by having material as I
level online just completely to banks the idea that monograph so they are only
for a very small hitting a community so we’re getting 400 readers a total the
total per month from all around the world and and so really there’s a lot of
appetite here for academic knowledge good quality academic knowledge that’s
been burned up in the monographs and inaccessible and the locations up I just want to quickly draw visitors
from where and just get over it pretty quickly and but picking up on charges .
about cost so last year we we published 20 new
title and it cost of the hundred thousand plans hello so I had / 20 we get 5,000 pounds
for a total cost and what you don’t have and it’s going to become a bit cheap of
crispix of times what it was but you know we’re coming back from the fucking
dollars there so i think it was pretty out there that can be done I have very different amounts of money
been was identified in that report and I think that’s a very important part of a
business model going forward is thinking how do we get these costs stopped
because it affordable to be doing it as we were doing it under the leg if you
will I again just very briefly to the the
tree primary sources of income that we have really it’s already said we don’t
charge public and offers any publishing fee about definitely have to send it i
will you come true from the title primarily of paper bag though that we
stroll and go back I back and front formatted Digital Editions that if I just have a
pretty country from there three percent comes from publishing
grace that authors are able to apply for no compulsion to that but this
publishing money out there so if there are further and that’s it’s a big chunk
of our of our revenue to look like the same come true from library membership
schemes wee witch witch child mentioned we’ve got all that library membership
program just put down over 30 for any city five
percent of 11 years coming true from sale it clearly we depend on norm sales
income to stay in our business so that’s just you know supporting my
child was saying is what we’re going to find different revenue streams I just wanted to follow up with other
words if an issue about the dissemination both the both the and
distribution and the discovery channel open access works and how these have
changed and I think it has a big impact on the role of libraries of could can
have going for you I could do that i just wanted to chase
down a particular and concentrate on a particular title so this is a book we
published in april university universal declaration of human rights in the
treatment center again is the link up there a couple of things just to quickly
point out on that we’ve got these free to reach edition there with that pointer
is we got retail editions at up here with a paperback and hardback and deep
and movie and these ebooks it’s just not it’s just not one version
of an e-book this there’s lots of different versions a lot
of dishes different digital editions which is the tree that could be lots
more I think something to keep in mind as
well there’s lots of different types of digital editions that there and it could
be costed differently and the distribution systems could be different
and that that’s something to keep in mind as well I have the third the full
thing to point out is that there is additional resources that come with a
lot of books now so that this web page of this home page is quite important to
the whole at for the provision of academic content not just the book
itself but also access to additional resources that might be associated with
the book and then finally just to point out we’ve got this ovp customized
component here without an axis which you can mix and match across books and
across content and this is the facilities that will help people to
create their own content and then like how we do it they can make their own and that’s
something again it’s a novel and and and something to think about going forward
about what an open access for can do and be so the supply chain just quickly going true
you know it’s a very traditional retail supply chain we with we’ve got trees finally supply chains for a book in the
retail taken to the library and the third is that was an access weeks so this is this is as with all know if
we get printed works but we pump the pump out amazon and the end and get a lot of
relatives of books or the old number of books so some of which will be accessed
your heels and other places and eBooks the territory the typical evil place of
the rest of these are four big ones but they left a lot of evil places these are coming from and directly to
the researcher or the reader I and the payment stream isn’t exactly
the opposite direction I’ve got a little little a picture of
other library down to the bottom there always got nothing to do with it as I
said that’s it independent process between the
researcher and the second string is it was wonderful the library supply time
but I supply chain means that we bring our printed works staying true to the
various I also distributed Ingraham trail suite we sort of childhood slides can use of
the big one in there any in in Britain until it’s good this is the typical crisis coming to
reveal the books go through the the aggregator and then it gets as sent out
to their the library and the money goes in the opposite direction the direct relationship between the
publisher and the library similarly with ebooks coming the other
way they’re going to revere various different than a great many platforms
are JSTOR’s go quickly hello yeah i would drive acceptor and
again this is a relationship between the library and the aggregator and between
the publisher and the aggregator and the money’s going in exactly the opposite
direction there is one big difference between
those two channels of air you just find my slices a be here but
it’s a very researcher is concerned the researcher interacts with the library
for disc to discover the works and to access the works and so their library
change there and one of the things that I would like to say is that they’re like
a chain millions broken its eyes open access to
existence and that reality night I like to point out is a very big
difference between the way that the object is conceived in these two models
under the printed works and it goes through the end the end holder of this
is the owner of the book in some sense they have the control over their book
and they can do pretty much what they want livable it presently a little
reason the ebook distribution system is different from that it’s really sitting
on the platform of the of the aggregator and and the lively painting it they don’t have ownership over and I
think that’s something that’s we need to come back and think about because I i
I’m i inclined to say that the ownership model is much more appropriate in an
open-access world the neighborhood model and we need to be
thinking really seriously that prison we put these digital content that’s coming
true under this at end of this and
aggregating platform and I don’t think that’s probably the right way you can
see that don’t know the nexus well I’m swamping those two distribution channels
is the freed the free channel and and the books that we put up on google books
and Worldreader and wikipedia and they’re uploaded into wordpress and and
have it yet completely swamps the the distribution and the activity that we’re
seeing in fact the ratio of users on those free edition that we put out and
we patrol these various different platform is about a hundred to one we
get about a hundred times more interaction without books on these three
platforms then we do through the traditional
routes and at that then we say the most so all these all these very things that
identified google books world pray for work they will create the world greater
they all service that are providing different editions of the work so will
their own edition of the work and is serving at himself not to do with us
with putting it up it and then it’s interacting and the water is engaged quickly in this enter into this in
involvement interaction between this free online in two direction it’s coming up the middle with
the library i think has real role is when they when you offered
the scholar wants to engage in that and bring material onto it so i would see
increasingly the or for looking to the library to help in the dissemination and
bring the work on and and the library sub it can help in several ways I directly by doing the dissemination
themselves as Charles has been talking about what or indirectly by involving
publishers that can can can do the casket wall and this pluses and minuses
to both of those roots but here we’re getting the the library being engaged in
the dissemination process rather than in the discovery process this recipe I all of the correct very quickly as as
wealthy at the issue here now is that there’s a relationship direct
relationship possible between the publisher and the library and that’s
something that we’ve been working with with the library membership scheme is
that now we’re able to go to the libraries have a relationship with us
which means we’re able to provide different product for people within
their frame within their domain then we are offer generally so in this case
somebody from the university of cambridge can download all I digital
editions for free they can get discount on printed work and we can do that very
simply with an ID so that we don’t need anything complicated to do that anybody accessing our website from any
of those free free processes will come true and be able to access those
membership benefits that that has been provided ok so the other point is discovery and
and I I realize that I’ve hurry a little here
so of the trigger this simple discovery roots as for our works and one of them
would be google and if you get a google and type in the name of the book this is what I got you guys might get
something different but this giggles pretty clever on how it it does these
but in the top 10 there’s one two three four five six of
those I are links that go too risky to free
editions of the work so you can access the words in its entirety to those
lengths or did they differ some of them up at the party websites
have put up a free d is one of them is a trust that put up with contributed to
the funding of of the whole Commission with having to post that the book review
we’ve got the books in all cases they can be easily accessed by anybody just
by clicking on that link we’ve got we’ve got it and we’ve got here jstor this is the first or traditional a
scholarly provided its link there if you got rid of the JSTOR link through the
university of cambridge i get this your institution does not have access to this
book so here is the only scholarly
dissemination places that came up there and it doesn’t give me access to the
book internal it doesn’t even indicate that it’s an open access working if i were to go in down the other
scholarly dissemination roots are my go-to will care I’m going to WorldCat I’d findable here
it is definitely at the epic the bottom number four if I click through to that I get this no indication anywhere here that this is
a at an open-access work and it’s freely accessible it’s just find a copy online if i look
at that there’s a beard that there is a yes i have at a pretty obscure little do
I reference here if you click on that you can do a little ride and you can
access the work it’s not very obvious if you click on
the open for publishing site you actually get a JPEG image of a cover for
some reason and if you click on Jason well you know we’re ready to go into
Jason so i can put it that the standard did a discovery process is filed here
and and if you get an iron university library website you don’t get it at all you know I tried
it anyway just doesn’t apparently it hasn’t got into the catalog of cambridge
university at the stage involved remember libraries and they’ve got the
macros and everything is a do implement some for some reason getting at rooted ok so I’m that’s really the main point
that I wanted to make there’s lots of lots of of of of ways if you want to
discover the works people are using social media they’re using all sorts of
ways of discovering work the traditional way of doing it with
scholarly book reviews is usually slow and hardly even notice that the workers
out the next so once again this wildwood discovery in the under the traditional
way is failing I mean I have concluded and and I the the main point here is that the
traditional scholarly distribution of discovery process I don’t think it fit for purpose
presently for open access it needs an awful lot of refined libraries can have
a really really important role in facilitating discovery and dissemination
of open access work but i don’t think that that that that access is any longer
an issue i think axis is pretty easily solved and that’s pretty cool cracked
but discovering dissemination that’s where really where I think libraries
have got a role play and they I really think they need to take a
proactive leadership role in doing that so they need to decide what they need to
do and and and take up and an active role rather than relying on third
parties to do it for them so thank you very much I’m do a quick
plug for all I remember is your program only five hundred dollars and lots of
information is available on our website if anybody’s interested thank you very
much thank you dr. gotti I’ll and I’ll quickly turn it over to
our next speaker Michael yelling whoo it’s my pleasure to hand it over to most
thank you much gee I feel like I feel like I have
a funny accent i’m not sure i didn’t miss that listen I couldn’t agree more with with
all of what was said in the previous presentations even where they disagreed and I think
dr. gaudy left left left text at a point that I fully agree with that is that
academic libraries have an important role to play in shining a light up into
those areas of the publishers and other other players I i need to be aware of libraries know
so much more about what it takes to actually make those books available in
the library and so first I want to provide some context and and after
having watched Charles Watkins presentation i realized i duplicate a
bit of that so i will go faster as everyone knows library budgets have
not been increasing uh you can take any number of charts and graphs and data
from all over the place about library budgets this one shows a library
expenditures as a percentage of total university expenditures not an
encouraging line more context is if you look at the red line at the blue line
here these are library acquisitions of
university press titles since 2011 you can see since two thousand twelve
days in in in a very strong decline and digital and not been growing the interesting thing however is the
grey line which is da records which are in fact folks for university presses and
we can say that although sales have been declining I never before have there been so many
university press ebooks available in libraries so that it’s also a positive
note I Charles also referred to an article he had something to do with that
appeared earlier this week and inside higher end called pressing changes and
noted that in fiscal year 2005 the Press published 155 titles and sold almost
300,000 copies generating five million dollars plus sales eleven years later titles published drop
by 40 60 at third and sales were cut almost in half and revenue plummeted by
forty percent i’m looking at 63 university presses a
will take him from one particular University Press platform and looking at
the percentage of the new titles published so about 3,400 new titles
appeared in our fiscal 2016 none of the aggregator platforms i
exceeded fifty percent of those so although in that graph showing da
records available there are more University Press titles available than
ever before I have there are a lot of titles that
aren’t making it into that into that Universal content so a lot of it is
falling out i also have proof that data on the
ithaca study showing the cost of publishing monographs Charles talked
about the average price was between 30 and 50 thousand dollars and ranging from
a little sixteen thousand dollars all the way up to a hundred and thirty
thousand dollars to produce a monograph it’s quite an extensive business and his
trials that emphasized its not free there are still costs so we’re squeezing
the balloon there maybe efficiencies but that they’re still costs and open access
content has been available for a long time and vendor systems although i don’t
know that you’d call it open access to the finals in there and so for example a
national academies press I to name just one eye open book
publishers is another world bank ranch corporation I’m i’m sure you all know Athabasca
University Press they’re all out there online free you
can download a PDF read online a doctor . he showed you some of the options for
open book publishers and here it is in Gobi you can see that it’s been profiled
which is our google plant system where we add metadata content levels of
leadership levels of crisis for the books to the print is a scary surprise
acids for virtually all of these and also in the right side
you’ll see there’s libraries history consortium of history . history Ultimate editions table of contents at
the reviews so this is how that open access title
but is for the retail user is integrated friendly into a systems for a discovery
insemination through to academic libraries what’s interesting about this particular
book also when i looked it up i looked a little . or in its canadian library
university of calgary and i found that this book sold fifty five copies total I’m and when I looked at my little peer
group here I saw that none of these libraries for the only one did rick
anderson at university of utah gotta print edition of this but it’s available
in almost all of those libraries as a vivir a record which is free in turn to
use and so the book actually is very widely available at anybody who might
want to use it I’m and this is what it looks like and
go be in terms of your digital purchase opportunities so you have three of the major
aggregators with different models and a price for each and here’s some in the RetailMeNot market the Amazon
version see that the kindle edition sixty dollars and paperback and seventy
dollars so what’s important here is is the
integration into vendor systems to support library workflows that support
the Avengers a child support the libraries and I think again this is why
it’s important for libraries to become actively involved and engaged with the
publishers to let them know what they need and so we have three main areas
that yvp that we need to support the acquisitions process the in an hour and
transactions for the content technical services which make it discoverable
cataloging records Sarah ad and collection management at
how does this fit in with the rest of the collection including duplication
control and how do these titles integrate this is a huge problem with
the roughly 70,000 new english language scholarly bolts and a library will
consider through an approval plan every year we don’t those books into
approval system and match it to library profiles and there’s an output in my PDA
it might be a notification slip it might be part of an evil collection I send out instructions that publisher a
standing order etc so the library support services are essential and when
we start to think what they are it’s the identification I have a pre-publication of what these
titles for the souls will be so we need to be at influence in some way about
these the titles we also need to know the floor mats and we need to know where
the content will be available whether on open book publishers can they support a
link from you know a million libraries worldwide the profiling system metadata
creation that facilitate the collecting we have to integrate these titles into
that process delivery mechanisms that we have to school paper and cloth and dr.
got said thirty-five percent of their revenue comes from those sales I the evil platforms we need to have links
to all of those at the models collections integrated e-print of San
standing order subscriptions etc we need to manage duplication control and in the
case of the physical book straight in and out and soils warehousing cetera I cataloging for the library with
customization so in the book arrives he’s an open access it easily integrated
into our processes in place of the physical processing for Chromebooks and
that the invoicing record keeping the the old business management piece that
you saw in the upper right corner of that will be ready to record there’s a lot of costs there without
even getting to profit I just to support this part of business I thought one of the parts of the ithaca
study that was lacking was the marketing and distribution part which is important
for making these things available easily in academic vibrates to the challenge
for open access inclusion in discovery and distribution workflows open this should be free to the library is
that includes tus every acquisition and delivery Marc records no hidden fees there should
be a print option available and global distribution and so grace is an essential role to play in
forming open access initiatives of work so support requirements why are those important to you and we
have just two minutes left and I know discussion is important here so I’ll end
with that thank you thank you Michael and I this
is mark from a serial and choice if you have questions for our panelists i would
encourage you to enter them into the chat box and as they roll in we would be happy to to put them to them
and I think we have a few here in the cube uh one of the questions that came to a
little earlier from Robert in Charleston West Virginia he said do you feel the
University Press has an obligation to their faculty and or regional material i
believe that was for Charles but I would let anyone on that the panel who has a
response to that – feel free to response yes after this is charles I’m i do think so I’m most university presses I as Robin
knows have a sort of a regional list I’m the challenges with open access
their that the regional list is often are still a moneymaker for university
practice and there is some reluctance to give up that financial flows so a little
bit of reluctance around open access although i will say that i think there’s
a an interesting and related conversation about availability all
University Press regional books in public libraries in their region which
in my experience is very very limited and may be an interesting role for a DPL
a to play in that space I’m in terms of own faculty university
press is generally publish only around a ten percent of the other that only about
ten percent of an average university press of books would be from their own
faculty and there’s still this kind of inbuilt are concerned about publishing
your own faculty members some university presses of dealing with that by setting
up publishing services operation and that’s what Michigan has done its what
university of north carolina has done though another option thank you I think we have another question from
lisa and greenville north carolina and then she asks what the new show access
and indicators practice improve discoverability not to dominate the
conversation but this is charles again um I think there are interesting
initiatives that nice is doing I’m i picked up on chat briefly that I
think a really important standard I’m uh entity I’m in this spaces editor
editor is a book and street group that set the standard for onyx which is like
a mark for publishers it’s the information supply chain standard and
they actually maybe even a couple of years ago created an onyx standard for
open access ebooks which is actually very very good and now I’m excuse like
ypp and coots are actually looking at ways of bringing that into their system
and I think that will help a lot thank you n dad I believe analyse and at least from San
Francisco ass perhaps we just need a practice we just
need to discovery methods to do a better job of finding a way book content shoot
and she notes that are understanding records and world can be incredibly
confusing is there a way to to improve that too to
make them more more accessible or two are there additional standards that
could be used or that the folks know about on the panel gosh I don’t want video in 1 speaking of
any start that off i mean i think absolutely record in WorldCat are
incredibly confusing um and I really think oclc is a very
important player in this space and I haven’t heard them talk a lot about the
challenges of open access books but well cat records being confusing as a problem
for all publishers now and the number of times we’ve had also is now coming to us
saying why didn’t my royalty statements match the number of libraries to appear
to have a book that you published of mine is ridiculous and of course our
world cat records do not illustrate um well which life is actually have
materials in their collections because of da etc so a lot of work to be done at
a shield as Chelsea’s and i believe it was get a question from ok thanks hey can I just
give everybody a good is it really that bad i think i just
wonder how many academics actually use I’m have the the library catalog can you
know the discovery process is really happening away from the the traditional
rituals they used to and yes we do need good ways of discovering content but you
know without access the entire content is available for search engines online
just not just the title in the mac record the entire content so i think it
changes entirely to search process that an academic it will be looking for and
what we’re looking for in a discovery engine we’re not looking I don’t think for a
title any longer we’re looking for the content and that’s
available in an open access for men it can be searchable and it said i did
it i think we need a completely different way of discovering content and
we need to be working on that I’m but yes great thank you for that we got another question from you on and
in Princeton New Jersey and he says for Michael I didn’t see section in Gobi
which marks the book is open access if it is why is that right well the way we
find out about content is still teach from publishers and Friends of open
access publishers to do we don’t have any feeds that have been offered and i
think that these issues have been concerned in terms very recently in
trouble since political leaders by the way and they’re very focused on creating
the content and family hosted center and i have not been engaged with vendors and
data I feel that that needs to happen are you
touch that our necks for example in an extremely the field that lets us know
that something is available as open access to where they’re always they’re
feeding us that information and then we have to a broadband technology which of
course is in order to prevent your system I have including that information in our
system so braise some engineering work at yourself and relationship building
that needs that second and third and none of it is easy whatever i’m moving in that direction
it’s a good question I expect one day left you’ll see that great thank you uh and aaron from urbana
illinois notes for or sort of apps I’m not sure we should assume the workflows
for access restricted books are good ones and i think that was that directed
or came out of dr Gotti’s discussion with just a few words on that sorry I i was trying to type of the same
time i’m not sure and John my comment on on the public doesn’t bother but just
got up I’m can you look at that absolutely so
erin was was asking or commenting on the he sayin he’s not sure that we should
assume the workflows for access restricted books are are necessarily
good ones and ensure they apply to away books yeah I’m not natural what you mean by
the fight that working with slides there and is it the right size with publisher
of the workflow see distributor in the workflow to the academic I’m and I that
I don’t mind so it’s the same for all those I don’t think you want to swing at
work work so close that I a good and not sure that we want to be repeating those
i think that you know we really are in a world everything is shaking up in car
workflows that I i I’m going to change as well and and we’ve got to be flexible
on we’re going to be having the community and I you know it’s michael
city to city is going to be sending out the signals of water is needed to the
people at their position to be able to open provide that and yeah yeah and this is charles i mean
i think the person i disagree on this I’m I i consider the traditional library
supply workflows as really important in over open access books partly because
and really concerned about the idea that open access ebooks are represented in
any way as different as having their own siloed work slow because I we already
have a credibility issue around open access ebooks and suggesting that they
have to have a separate workflow that they are not equivalent to access
restricted books really arm increases that credibility issue I i I’d better actually agree with you
Devon add child shorter yeah we’ve got it we’re going to be able
to say this book should side by side with an open x1 did not then not and yeah they can do it because I think
open access for can do everything a college access work can do a whole lot
more and they’re certainly we don’t want to
be saying that this solid offer something separate and they need to be
integrated and that’s why we need the whole system to be changing to integrate
them into the system and and make it work thank you for that thank you to all of
you and unfortunately our time is coming to an end today so like to take a moment to thank you
charles and dr. Gotti and Michael for spending some time with us today ah and i’d like to give each of you a
virtual round of applause that is the information you shared with
was really wonderful and what we have and i know i personally have appreciated
your insight that just as a reminder for folks that are watching this week ever we have recorded stage program so be on
the lookout for a follow-up email from a crl and choice that should include instructions on how
to access the archived version of this recording thanks again for joining us and I hope
you enjoyed the session please have an excellent day

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