The Mexican Citizens Fighting America’s Fires

The Mexican Citizens Fighting America’s Fires


The reason we need the Diablos is because of our remote nature. They’re all very good firefighters. We’re the only park service unit in the country that has an international fire crew. We’re not always just depressing fires. Another really important role for us as firefighters is the prescribed burn. This river even though it’s the border, it brings us together. The river forms a border at El Paso and Juarez, and it travels about 1,430 kilometers before it reaches the Gulf of Mexico. Along that border, the population right now is roughly about 3 million people. The river and the water that it provides is hugely important. The river has brought us together. And even though it’s a border, we are working collaboratively to protect it. Climate change is a real issue. It’s becoming warmer, it’s becoming drier. And there’s not enough water as there was in the past. So right behind me is Giant Cane. It’s scientific name is Arundo donax. It grows five feet in a month. And it has taken over many rivers in the Western US. What we do is burn it before we apply herbicide. So the black you see over here is what we burned yesterday – the cane. And this is what we want the cane to look like after we burn it. And then over here behind us, the green is what we’re going to be burning today if we get favorable conditions. By the end of today, that will now look like this. With burning Cane, the biggest thing that we want is to get a big fire quick. This is about as ideal as you can get with burning the Cane. Couldn’t ask for anything better. This event today is kind of a benchmark for us. The river is going to look like a river again. You know a lot of people see fire and smoke they think of destruction, but in this case, in this particular time, in this moment, along this particular river, this fire reads to me rejuvenation. This is two nations coming together to manage a resource that’s of value to both of them. Americans when they think about the border, it’s what they hear on the news. And it’s often all bad. And they don’t hear the good stories. We’re working on a significant stretch of the river here. This is not like 100 meters or something like that. We’re working on over 100 kilometers of river.

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    ROLANDO HERNANDEZ

    My Father Fought Wildlifes In The Late 60s Early 70s He Was A Volunteer, We Lived In A Small Town Were We Grew Up , Wilder , Idaho , My Father Would Sometimes Be Gone For Months At A Time, He Would Tell Us Of The Places He Had Been And Bring Us Souvenirs , I Still Have Two Leather Vests He Got On A Indian Reservation I Respect These Men Who Volunteer To Fight These Wild Fires Knowing That They Can Lose Their Life At Anytime, There Is Nothing Stronger than A Heart Of A Volunteer

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    Salvador Guerrero

    Saludos desde Washington compas, de parte de un bombero voluntario. Seria un placer trabajar con ustedes

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