UMI Global Citizens 2018 Presentations

UMI Global Citizens 2018 Presentations


– Hi everyone. So, today we are
presenting, the eight of us, well actually a couple of
people couldn’t make it, so I’ll be speaking on their behalf. But we are the Urban Morgan
Fellows of summer 2018. So we went all over the world. We had a couple of people
in domestic work here, and we also had people all
over other parts of the world, Europe, Africa, you know, you name it. We all, although in different places, were furthering the mission of human rights and Urban Morgan. So, our mission today is hopefully to inform you about this program,
how you can get involved, and hopefully convince you to go abroad because all definitely think you should. So, now I’m going to turn
it over to Francesca, who’s our first presenter,
about her time in Georgia. – So good afternoon everyone, my name is Francesca Gottardi
and I spend my summer at the Ministry of Internal
Affairs in Georgia. So in my presentation, I
will tell you a little bit about Georgia, give you some key facts, talk about my experience at the ministry, talk about the ministry, my duties while working there, and why I recommend this experience. So here are some key facts about Georgia. If you don’t know much
about it, don’t worry. It’s a small country in the Caucasus and the capital capital city is Tbilisi. Four millions people are living there. The currency is Georgian Lari, and the language is Georgian,
the official language. The type of government is a
semi presidential democratic republic with a president
that is the head of state and it’s currently represented
by Giorgi Margvelashvili, and a prime minister that
is the head of the cabinet of the ministries, head of the government, which is Mamuka Bakhtadze. So, here is a little map of Georgia. Georgia borders on the north with Russia, east with Azerbaijan,
south Armenia and Turkey, and then with the Black Sea. And an interesting aspect
about this tiny little country in the Caucasus is that about
20% of the country itself is occupied by Russia. So, this is part of what
made my experience there under a human rights perspective
particularly interesting, because, of course, this
situation causes tensions, and a situation that
it’s interesting to study under the human rights perspective. So, the ministry is organized in, the government, the Georgian government is organized in 14 ministries, and one of those is the
Ministry of Internal Affairs. So, the minister, which
is there in the picture, representative picture
with me, Giorgi Gakharia, is the representative of the
Ministry of Internal Affairs. And then, there are four deputy ministers, one of those is Natia Mezvrishvili, that help Giorgi Gakharia
carry out his daily mission. So, the function of the
Ministry of Internal Affairs are threefold. First of all, the ministry
oversees the police force, then it’s in charge of
safeguarding public safety, and maintaining civil order. So, a difference that I
noticed with the US is that the activity of the
Ministry of Internal Affairs in Georgia is very much centralized. While here in the US that’s not the case. And in terms of Georgian relationship with the European Union, they
are there, they’re visible, and Georgia, although it’s not
part of the European Union, is striving every day to
comply with EU legislation to align its values
with the European Union. Also, to give the strong message of being a Western, civilized country
that shares those values. So, my duties were multifold. So, first of all I was reporting directly to Deputy Minister Natia Mezvrishvili, who is a former LLM, as I was last year, so we could immediately
relate on the experience we had here at the
University of Cincinnati, and again, she’s in a very
high up position right now, and that’s a person who I was working for. So, my daily work consisted
in taking care of portfolios, and in particular, my
asset there was to conduct international reader research, as my background is in
both civil and common law, that was an interesting asset for them. So, I researched on cybersecurity, in particular, cyber bullying, and then I compiled
portfolio on the police force with a comparative
perspective, and in particular, I analyzed the role of police force, when it came to the relationship, and their way to behave towards
minorities and juveniles. And I also compiled a
dossier on domestic violence. Then, part of my duties were
also to attend conferences, go to events, and then
report back to the ministry. The atmosphere at work was
very relaxed, very stimulating. It was, of course, very
gratifying to be part of a structure that would
otherwise be very difficult to access, and to see how
politics and law in the making work at a governmental
institution of that level. And then, it was particularly
interesting to me to witness that women were given
a very prominent role. So, two of the four deputy
ministers were women, and many of the lawyers
working in my department were also women, mostly young women. So for me, it was
interesting and stimulating to work hand in hand with
professionals of the same gender that could be an inspiring example for me. And the schedule was
Monday through Friday. I worked full time. And again, the atmosphere
was really positive and it felt really challenging
in my daily activities. So, here’s why I
recommend this experience. First of all, to challenge yourself. Second, it’s an eye opener
to what other realities might look like and to other
ways to approach the law. And it is also a great
way to challenge your practical legal skills and
to just get off the books and put your skills into practice. And of course it’s a way to
experience a new culture, and to travel as most
of us in our free time also had the opportunity to
visit the bordering countries. And of course, every
experience of that kind carries an intrinsic
networking and resume value. So, here’s why I recommend it. And this is my thank you, madloba didi, to the Urban Morgan Institute, in particular to Professor
Lockwood and to Nancy for allowing me to be part of
this incredible experience. So, thank you, and for any
questions, I’ll be around. (audience claps) – Alright, thank you Francesca. So, hi everyone, my name’s Kennedy Womack. I think I know most of you. My externship abroad was
in The Hague, Netherlands, at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. So, in very brief detail, there is much that could be said about it,
so I can’t go into all of it, but the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, or STL, which I’ll call it for short, is a tribunal of international character. The STL was inaugurated on March 1st, 2009 and has four organs, which
are the chamber, the registry, the prosecutor, and the defense office. The high courts of the
STL are on the outskirts of The Hague, Netherlands,
so it’s actually in a place called Leidschendam, but we also mainly say
that it’s in The Hague, and it also has a office in Beirut. The primary mandate of
the STL is to hold trials for the people accused of carrying out the attack of February
2005 which killed 22 people including former Prime Minister
of Lebanon, Rafic Hariri. The STL marks an evolution
in the development of international justice,
with a number of features that do not exist in other
international tribunals or courts. It’s the first international tribunal to try crimes under national law. The STL prosecutes under
the Lebanese criminal codes relating to terrorism
and offenses against life and personal integrity,
illicit associations, and failure to report crimes and offenses. My internship was in the
registry part of the tribunal. So, I worked in court management
services, in the registry. The registry is responsible for the good administration and
servicing of the tribunal and is led by the registrar
and basically makes, in effect, the engine room for any external and internal functions. So, court management services provides legal, procedural, and
administrative support and services in all matters relating to
proceedings before the tribunal. It serves as a liaison between the organs to ensure the most efficient
use of courtroom time and coordinates the required
support and facility services before, during, and after
the proceedings each day. CMSS is also responsible
for receipt of all filings, decisions, and orders in all trial related
proceedings at the tribunal, as well as the efficient
management of court records, administering requests
for judicial cooperation between the tribunal,
international, and other entities. Finally, the CMS also
serves as the in court representative of the registrar
in daily court proceedings. Although I can’t get into extreme detail about my internship
projects, as they are secret until the tribunal is dissolved
upon the case conclusion, I can tell you that my
primary internship duties were to assist in processing exhibits in specialized electronic data system, including completing
accurate metadata fields to ensure search and retrieval capability, to assist with maintaining
compiling reports and drafting submissions, and to assist in completing legal analysis for functions related
to the court management responsibilities of the section. So, now for the fun part. Life in the Netherlands was
amazing and life changing. As predicted, each day brought
new adventures and discovery. It is a bit funny how Holland
held up to its stereotypes. There’s lots of tall
people who are blonde, so many bikes everywhere,
and amazing stroopwafels. People in the Netherlands are
also some of the most kind in the world, and I made
so many friends there, and I miss it everyday. In conclusion, I’m so
grateful for the opportunity to travel abroad this summer
thanks to Urban Morgan and Nancy and Professor Lockwood, and I guarantee your experience will be nothing short of magical, if
you choose to do the same. I made friends from all
over the world like Bo-ya, who is from China and
hopes me to visit her soon. You have the most
incredible work experience getting to see monumental international decisions take place firsthand, and ultimately you wake up every day in one of the most beautiful
places in the world, and what better can that be. If you even are considering
going abroad, please talk to myself or one of my
fellow interns about it. I guarantee we can answer
any questions or concerns you may have, as we were
right in your shoes last year. Take a leap of faith. Just do it. It’ll change your life. Thank you. (audience claps) – [Audience Member] Was
Bo-ya at the tribunal? – Yes, she was in the
office of the prosecutor. – Hi everyone. So, I didn’t technically go abroad, but LA can constitute a foreign
country, in so many ways. So, I was partnering with Urban Morgan. So, last summer I did go
to Dominican Repbulic, so that was part of my
first year experience. This year I went to LA to
work on immigration cases, which, in this climate, are
very much human rights cases. So, I worked with Esperanza
Immigrant Rights Project. They are an offshoot
of Catholic Charities. It’s a weird relationship. They’re affiliated with
Catholic Charities, but they’re not exactly
under Catholic Charities, so they have a lot more leeway than some other Catholic
Charities organizations do. So, they’re in downtown LA, and they work with immigrants who are
unaccompanied minors, and then they have a direct
representation program that works with immigrants who are in Adelanto Detention Center. I felt really weird taking this picture and like smiling outside of Adelanto. It’s an absolutely horrible place, but I needed something. (laughter and crosstalk drown out speaker) I know, I was like,
should I frown or what? – It’s probably more LA to. – A little bit about
LA, so this is Malibu. I did take advantage of all the beaches. You should, if you go on
an Urban Morgan experience, take advantage of the culture
and where you’re living. These are a bunch of the interns and some of the staff that
I worked with this summer. We were on a march to protest
the family separation. So, that was a cool experience to be involved in advocacy as well. And the World Cup was this summer, and I was in downtown LA. It was like all Mexican. So, we went, as an office outing, to a Mexican bar, and it was crazy. But I want to talk a little bit more about the work that Adelanto does. I’m sorry, the work that Esperanza does. So, they have several programs, and if you were to intern with them, you can apply for different programs. So, they have a legal orientation program that works in Adelanto Detention Center. So, those interns have to go to Adelanto two to three times a week, which is like an hour
and a half away from LA. So, it’s a pretty intense
commitment, but it’s really cool. They meet in the morning
times with detained immigrants and tell them about their rights, help them fill out different
application processes and different things. So, they’re actually in
Adalanto Detention Center. The LOPC program, the Legal Orientation
Program for the Community, is based in our office, and they meet with unaccompanied minors and help them also fill out applications, they do know your rights trainings, and they do a lot more
community orientation. There is a help desk, inside of the court, that Esperanza runs as well. So, if you’re a part of the help desk, you meet with clients right before they go into their proceedings, if they’re pro ses, so if
they don’t have an attorney. And there’s also a low bono program. So, they charge clients
a little bit of money, and they help them with their processes. I worked in the direct
representation program. So, we represent immigrants
in Adelanto who are detained. And we work with a lot of immigrants who have mental illnesses. There is a case in the ninth
circuit, it’s called Franco, that determined that immigrants
who do have mental illnesses do have the right to an
attorney, which is really nice. Hopefully it’ll be
implemented countrywide, but at least in the ninth
circuit there’s a strong case. So, a lot of our clients, the government actually
pays us to represent them, and the administrative proceedings. So, my client was a
lawful permanent resident who’d been in the US for 40 years. She’s severely, severely,
severely mentally ill, shouldn’t have been in Adelanto. She was hospitalized five times
during her representation. Her treatment was terrible. It was a really intense case. But we represented her
in her legal proceedings to apply for withholding of removal. And we were actually granted
the case after I left, so I wasn’t able to be at the hearing. I wrote a filing. I think we filed about 1300 pages, which I’m sure the judge
was really excited to read. It was all of her medical information, her criminal history records, and I wrote the brief for that case. So, I got to be a part of. That was basically the
work that I did all summer was preparing this one case for trial. And these are all the interns that we had. We had a bunch of one-Ls,
actually most of them were one-Ls, and then I think three of us are two-Ls. So, if you’re interested in this program, you should definitely apply. LA’s a cool place to live, and you get to be a part
of changing people’s lives and helping protect people’s rights. This was one of the fundraisers at the end of the year for Esperanza. Definitely go to LA, and if you’re interested in immigration, it’s a really cool experience, and you can be involved in
a lot of different programs. If you have any questions, let me know. (audience claps) – [Kennedy] Doesn’t Ronnie look
like a major queen in this. – Hi my name is Ronnie. I went to Gaborone, Botswana. It was kind of different this year. Typically they would work
with Unity Dow in department. She was previously the
Minister of Education, but a few weeks before I
got there, she was switched to the Minister of
Infrastructure and Housing. This is Unity Dow. (audience laughs) (audience member mumbles question) Yes. And then actually when I was there, she was moved again to, I think it was, the Minister of International Affairs, – [Audience Member] Foreign affairs. – Foreign affairs, yes. So, there wasn’t really much for me to do with her at the parliament, so I ended up working at her
law firm, Dow and Associates, which her son is actually
the leader of the that. So, I got to partake in a
lot of general practice law, which was very good, cause their laws are very similar to ours. Botswana was a British protectorate, so they kind of copied and
pasted the British common law. If you end up going
there you’ll be able to not only experience a lot of law, but it’ll actually be
similar, and you can apply it when you come back to your two-L year. It was very nice. It was a beautiful country,
and I blended right in. Everybody thought I was from there, until they tried to speak Setswana to me. Then they realized that
I was not from there. They were actually shocked when I told them that I was American. But I did actually
learn a lot of Setswana. I’m starting to lose it now, cause I haven’t really been practicing. But it was beautiful. This was from a bonfire
that we had one night. It was winter there
when I went over there, but it was very nice. It was very calming, very peaceful. I know a lot of times you
don’t really get this view of like the moon and the stars here. So, it was very peaceful. I got to cross the border
a lot into South Africa. This is me, one foot in Botswana,
one foot in South Africa. I actually tried to go to Madikwe, which is a game reserve in South Africa, but we kinda took the wrong way and went to the wrong gate, so it was like interaction over this (mumbles) So, hopefully you guys will have more success at seeing more wildlife. – [Kennedy] Who took this last picture? Also while I was over there
I got to work with Kitso. I met her. She was also an attorney
at Dow and Associates, so I basically met one of
my best friends over there. It’ll be a great experience
to meet new people, when you experience a different culture, while learning transferrable
skills here in the US. – Hello, I’m Isabel Johnston. I was working at Kayi and Wilkes immigration firm in Washington, D.C. So, I was also not able to go abroad. I think my story’s pretty
similar to Natalia’s because we were both doing immigration. (asks question softly) Alright, so, I was at Kayi
and Wilkes Immigration Firm. Wilkes is Lindsey Wilkes,
and she went to school here. I met her last year at a
human rights conference that was here, and Professor
Lockwood introduced us, and he was like, I need
you to work together, so make it happen. So, we made it happen. She graduated in 2012. And so, her firm, she started
with her partner Varsha Kayi, about five years ago. It will be five years in December, and it’s just the two of them, so our office was those
two attorneys and then me. And so, I was able to
do literally everything that I could do. I took the lead on several
Central American asylum cases, and I was still able to be kept
up to date once I came back, because I’m still working
for them remotely. So, once those asylum cases were granted, I was able to know, which was really cool. I worked directly with the clients. I would be the direct
communication for a lot of clients. And then I also had experience. Oh that’s Lindsey and Varsha. I was able to go to court,
and draft some motions, and really just get an
experience with like everything immigration. And most of what they do is asylum, so it was mostly asylum related, but we also had some like family
petitions, marriage cases. And then the previous picture was, or this is the Library of Congress. The previous picture was at a rally, the Families Belong Together rally, that was halfway through the summer, and it was huge. There’s the White House. We yelled a lot of things in the direction of the White House. There were a lot of people there. People kept passing out from the heat, but it was super cool experience. So, that was something also
really cool about being in DC. Just being in the nation’s
capital, going to this rally. I was able to go to another
end family separation rally. Just had access to a lot of advocates, and then connected with
other attorneys in the area, people who are working in
immigration advocacy generally, even outside of the law. I don’t know what else I have. – [Kennedy] I think it was
just those four so far. – Okay, so it was just cool being in DC, getting to explore,
going to see monuments, having access to a different
kind of cultural diversity that you don’t really see
as much in Cincinnati, eating a lot of cool food. – [Brittany] Pride parade. – Pride parade. I saw Brittany at the Pride
parade which was really cool. – [Kennedy] You guys
just ran into each other? – Well I knew she was gonna be in town. But there were like other UC students that were in town for that
weekend, so that was cool. Another cool thing about DC
was that I was able to meet up with people from the rest of the country that happened to be in
DC for specific reasons like training for their internships. I saw my sorority big from college, who was getting her training
for an internship in Colorado, was in DC, so I was able to
see her, which was really cool. I wouldn’t have been able to do that outside of the country, probably. So, this was just a really good experience to get a lot of good
hands on legal experience. – [Audience Member] Did you go inside the Library of Congress? – Yes I got a card, and that
was the only time I went. (laughs) – [Audience Member] They
have that beautiful, right? – Oh like the entire inside is a amazing. We took a lot of pictures. I think my experience
was also kind of weird, because, since it was just
the three of us in the office, I didn’t really meet other law students or have other intern friends. So, I was doing a lot of things by myself, but I still had a good time. It was a good growing experience. I was only able to do this because of Nancy and Professor Lockwood through UMI. (audience claps) – [Kennedy] Oh no, I just needed it for some information. – Hi, I’m Rebekah. I went to Galway, Ireland for mine, and honestly it was wonderful. That’s actually a picture of
me in front of the building. It’s a very small building. That is me and Kathleen. She’s friends with Nancy Ent. She’s an amazing woman. She’s an American. She teaches there, and she
really made me feel at home, while I was in Ireland,
because when I first arrived, I’m like I have no idea what’s going on, and she honestly made it so much better. Wrong button. Just kind of like a quick thing. This, where I am in Ireland, is Galway. So, it’s on the west coast. I think of it similar to like California. It’s very kinda like surfer like. It’s where a lot of people go on holidays, and it’s about three hours west of Dublin, so you can catch a bus from
Dublin to Galway and so forth. And it’s super nice; loved it. And that’s kinda what it looks like. All it is is pretty much
you can walk all the time. My favorite part was to
walk down here by the coast, cause it’s quite rocky,
but still it has beaches, during like the low tide, so
you can go and chill there. And this is actually,
they have a lighthouse, and that’s actually Galway right there. You can walk on the
lighthouse, kinda look back, and that’s the North Atlantic right there. Extremely cold. Wouldn’t recommend swimming in it, especially if you’re
not used to cold water. And this is the River Corrib that runs down near downtown Galway. Just kind of nice beauty shots. It was absolutely beautiful, and yes, it is almost always cloudy. That’s why Irish people are so light. It’s always cloudy. There’s not a lot of sun. There was a good week where it was sunny, and then it was like this
the rest of the time. And also, important
thing, it’s very important with the Irish people, is, with
the great famine, in Galway, a lot of people left Galway. It was the last sight of Ireland they had before they left for the Americas. And there’s a lot of
reminders of the great famine, especially this one. This is about how a little girl, she was basically skin and
bones, she was starving, and she ended up dying in their care, and the doctors realized that
she had not eaten in so long, and that was because, even
though the crops were failing, the English were still requiring Ireland to ship their food out of Ireland. It’s definitely a very important thing that Ireland really, like, has, cause it happened recently,
in the late 1800s. So, I just thought I’d talk about that. There are lots of historical stuff like, we’re not used to things
being younger than, or, yeah, older than like in the 1700s, but there’s a lot of
history, and I love it. And actually before my internship started, I did a research internship,
before it started. They have an ICC summer school, and that’s actually a new ICC judge. She is from Uganda. That is Judge, hopefully I
can pronounce her name right, Judge Solomy Balungi Bossa, from Uganda, and she is now a new judge on there. And so, everyone comes
from all over the world to learn about the ICC. In this case, a lot of
people from Africa came, because we were talking about
how important Africa is to it. So, I got to meet a lot of people that I would never have
met before, had I not gone. So, pretty much what I did was research. This is what an average
day for me looked like. Just sitting there scouring the internet, not only for UN global compacts, security council resolutions, important international literature that can be used for law,
and so forth and so on. So, pretty much my day. Everything was super relaxed,
because you’re just holed up, researching at a computer,
so it didn’t really matter. That’s pretty much how
I would spend my days. It was pretty easy to do, because I absolutely love researching, and you could pretty much, as long as you had internet connection, you could go anywhere to do the research. And I also got some research
buddies along the way. Both of them are also from America. That over there, she is Boudica. She is like 20. She graduated from college, super smart. And then that’s Dana. She, surprisingly, is actually a law student in Ohio as well. Didn’t know that until I met her. So, we really kinda
formed a little cohort. And yeah, we’d talk about war crimes. Kind of felt bad. Even though I’m doing human trafficking, that was my research on human trafficking, Boudica had to do stuff
in terms of torture and translating and doing
transcripts on torture. So, that’s the stuff we were workin’ with, pretty nasty stuff, but it kind of helped that we all were in it together. And, like everyone else,
I got to travel a lot. I tried to do my best to travel
to a lot of EU countries. I actually traveled,
with Kennedy, to Germany. We walked Berlin for like an entire day, and I also traveled with
her to the Netherlands. And I traveled, actually by
myself, to visit Luxembourg, because my mom’s paternal
side of the family actually immigrated
from Luxembourg in 1858, and so I wanted to kinda
get in touch with my roots. And found the house that they
actually lived in in 1858. I still actually have relatives that live in Luxembourg to this day. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to meet them. They were on holidays at the time, but they do still live there, and I got to go by their
house and everything. So, it was kind of wonderful
to get in touch with my roots. It was an amazing time. I don’t really have much more
on it, but if you can, do it. It was amazing. I would never have met some
people unless I had done this. I think that’s the best
thing about going abroad is you can meet people that you normally would never talk to, and honestly, the thing
with human rights is you just kinda have to see the person, and if you see the person, you can really deal with everything. So, yeah that’s pretty much it. (audience claps) Well the next few people,
so Megan and Lauren both couldn’t make it today, so
they sent me some pictures and just a little paragraph
to read on their behalf. So, Megan Dollenmeyer went to the Indian Law Resource
Center in Helena, Montana. The Indian Law Resource Center
is a nonprofit organization that provides legal assistance and advocates for indigenous peoples across North, South, and Central America. She said that she spent a lot of time conducting legal research and drafting. Oh sorry I just realized I was over there. Drafting memos on key issues in the field of federal Indian law, which is the law governing the relationship between the federal government and Native tribes. Megan says she also worked
on some of the center’s international projects and their project on limiting violence against native women. She said that working at
the center was incredible, and learned a lot about
a niche field of law, and built relationships with
attorneys around the world. She said that if you’re
interested in indigenous rights, she would highly recommend working at the Indian Law Resource Center either in its Helena or
Washington, D.C. office. She sent these pictures. Helena is a beautiful place. I’ve never been there, but
I would love to go now, after seeing these. It’s just gorgeous, and
it just looks so peaceful. So, she took those. I’m obsessed. I think that’s her boyfriend’s arm. This is a cathedral of Helena, I believe she said in
her explanation of it. I don’t know much about
it, but that is there. So now I’m Lauren Ashley. So, Lauren spent her
externship in Bogota, Colombia, where she worked alongside
Professor Liliana Sanchez, at the University of Javeriana. For her externship,
she worked with Liliana on a research project regarding
sexual violence in Colombia. Her research revolved around
how the Colombian courts have generally treated
victims of sexual violence, the prevalence of sexual violence
against women in Colombia, and how their judicial
system can better respond to claims of sexual violence. She said that overall she had
an extremely rewarding time in Colombia and can honestly
say that she did not have any negative experiences,
while in the country. She made wonderful friends from Colombia and still talk with them a great deal and learned a lot about their culture and their current political climate. She said that she was
able to use her Spanish, as half of her research was actually in the Spanish language. So, for those of you who speak Spanish and like to capitalize
on your language skill, she would highly recommend doing
an externship at Javeriana. For any of you who may
have additional questions, she said that she would welcome an email at [email protected] It’s beautiful. I’ve never been there
also, but looks great. I wanna go now too. These are, I guess, some
of the people she met. They look really nice. I don’t know them, but. And that’s it. So, thank you guys so much for coming. (audience claps)

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