Who’s a U.S. Citizen? (Fatuma) | Lineup | Cut

Who’s a U.S. Citizen? (Fatuma) | Lineup | Cut


– Your name? – Callum. – Callum. Is that an accent? Is that an accent? I’m gonna guess no, you’re not a citizen. – I’m Fatuma. I was not. I’m from Kenya. I am a U.S. citizen. I think 2012. This is gonna be interesting. Alright. Y’all are so pretty. What’s your name? – Mary. – What’s your last name, Mary? – Demiga. – Are you Habesha? – Yeah. – I know my Habesha’s. How was it like growing up? – So, I grew up with my family. – Yes. – I moved here with my mom. (laughter) – I’m gonna say no, she’s not a citizen. – Why do you say that? – I say that because I
grew up with my family, like somewhere else, and
then I moved to the U.S. I just made that correlation
that maybe like– – But you’re a citizen though. – I am. – What makes you think I’m not? – That’s a good question. I just, I don’t know. Maybe you’re like, I don’t
know, in the process. I don’t know. – Sounds good. – But yeah, yeah, okay. – Hi. – I’m Fatuma. Your name? – Callum. – Callum. Is that an accent? Is that an accent? Because of the British accent
I’m gonna say he’s not. I feel like maybe he’s just here to like, for school or he moved here. Okay, give us your
American-English accent. – Okay, alright. Well I can only do a Southern accent. – Oh! – Now you have to do it, yeah. – Howdy, mate. That’s as good as it’s getting. (laughter) – My name’s Kendra. – Nice to meet you, Kendra. What is your last name, Kendra. – Gallan. – How was your background? Were your parents like, strict? – Yeah, they were. They were really strict, yeah. – Okay, what kind of
holidays do you celebrate? – Christmas– – Which one’s your favorite one? – New Year’s. There’s more traditions. Like you get to eat 12 grapes and like, make a wish for the 12 months of the year. – How did I not know this? Where do they celebrate it most? – I feel like in Latin America. – That answers my question. I feel like you’re from Mexico. I’m gonna say no. Okay, I’m gonna say no. Alright, what do you do for a living? – I’m just an engineer. – Just an engineer, did you hear that? Have you been in the
Seattle area for long? – Yes, since ’87. – He’s a citizen. – You probably think I’m old too right? (laughter) – No, I’m just thinking. Like the citizenship
like, process is long, but not that long. So I’m gonna say you are a citizen. – Okay, well we’ll find out. – That can’t be good. – Jocelyn. – Jocelyn. Do you speak any other language? – Si. – Oo, okay. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Girl, hold up. What is the supreme law of the land? – I have question marks all over. (laughter) – Okay, I’m gonna say she is a citizen because here’s why. I feel like a lot of people
who are already citizens don’t really know that. Yeah, I’m gonna say
yes, you are a citizen. – Okay. – I’m Fatuma. – I’m Maria. – And last name? – Gallan. – Were your parents really strict or– – Yes. – Immigrant parents are
very strict meaning no boys, sleepovers are out of the question. What does like, your typical like, Super Bowl kind of date look? – I don’t like football. – Do you like soccer, my lady? – Yes. – Ah okay, so… I’m gonna say no, you’re not a citizen. Are you Latino? – Um we’ll find out I guess. – Okay, okay. I’m gonna need to find
out what all y’all are. Have you been in this area for very long? – 18 years. – 18 years. Getting your citizenship doesn’t take more than 18 years usually. Yeah, I think you are a citizen. – Alright, thank you. – Do you play soccer at all? No soccer? Do you play any sports? – I play basketball, football, baseball. – He’s a real American. I’m gonna say you are a citizen. A lot of parents try to
get their kids into sports at a very young age and so if you’ve done three, I feel like you’ve been here awhile, or maybe your whole life. So yeah, a citizen. He is a citizen. (screams) Okay, okay this is pretty good. Out of how many people? Eight people. So– – You got me right. – Are you like, Ethiopian? – I’m Ethiopian and I have a green card. – That, okay that makes sense. How long have you like, been in the U.S.? – I’ve been here for 10 years. – You’ve been here for 10 years? – Yeah. – Are you looking into
becoming like, a U.S. citizen? – I’d rather just stay with
my Ethiopian citizenship since it doesn’t allow dual citizenship. – Wow, okay I did not know that. So you learn something new everyday. Okay, was that accent– – No, it’s real. – Okay, it’s a real accent. Dual citizenship!
– Yes, yes. – Okay, okay. I know, I’m like, is he
from Africa somewhere? (laughter) – So were you like, born here or– – I was born in England. – You were born in England. – Yes, my mom is originally American. My dad is British. – Oh, okay. So you had it at birth, even though you were born in, in England.
– In England, yeah. If you could choose which
citizenship means more to you, which one would you pick? – Right now, it’d definitely the U.K. I think before this last
couple of year or… Yeah, you know what I’m talking about. (laughter) – Yeah, I got you. I know, I know. So I got you wrong,
you are a U.S. citizen. – Yes. I was born here, I moved
to Mexico when I was three. Afterwards, we all moved back. So that’s the privilege
I hold in my family, the fact that I can go
back whenever I want. – Back and fourth– – And then you also didn’t notice that my last name’s Gallan, and her last name’s Gallan. – So you guys are siblings? – Yes. – Oh Lord. So you guys, same mom
,same dad and everything? They look so different! Come on up, I got you right. Where are you from? – I was born in Cambodia. I left the country when
I was seven years old. – Yeah. – Got to the U.S. about 10-11 years old. So between that time I was
staying in a refugee camp. – Really? – Typical Cambodian story. – What, you know, brought, got you into a refugee camp? Was it like, a war or something? – Yeah, the Khmer Rouge war where half the people in the country died. – Half? – Half. Like I said, I’m very
fortunate to be here. – And you’re an engineer. – You know, I just– (laugher) – American Dream, right?
– Exactly. Oh my god, that was so great. Great to meet you, thank you. So I guessed you– – You got me wrong. Thought I was a U.S. citizen
– Yes. but I’m not. Cause I’m here with DACA. – How has this whole like, whole immigration kind of issue like, affected you personally? – It’s physically, mentally,
and emotionally draining. So I think that anybody
who is a U.S. citizen is a lucky person. – Very lucky. The sisters that tricked me. So this is the other one. Your sister’s a U.S. citizen– – But I am not. – But you’re, wow. – I just have DACA, too. – DACA, wow. So in your experience, like how has it been for you? – It’s been kinda frustrating.
– Yeah. She can travel and stuff.
– Yes! And then recently my grandma came, and when I met her for the first time– – Yeah, yeah. – It was really emotional. And then when they went off
like, they went off together, I couldn’t go with them. – Wow. I’m so happy I guessed you right. – Yes, good job. (laughter) – So you said you’ve
been here for 18 years? – Yes. – From where?
– From Thailand. Do you have dual citizenship? – Yes I do. – If you were to choose one or the other– – For me, I would choose
American citizenship. For my gender information, in Thailand I’m a male. In America, I’m a female. – Yes. – So it’s more easy
for me, to living life. – Exactly. Thank you so much. – Nice meeting you. – Nice to meet you. I got you right. – Oh yeah. – Hey, thank God. From your standpoint, being
born here and everything, what message do you have
to people who have to– – Go through everything? – Have to go through it, yeah. – Keep pursuing your dream.
– Yeah. Eventually, it’ll get a little bit easier. I mean, it’s still
gonna be hard, you know, coming from a different background because people are really
like, close minded. – Exactly. True, true. But keep going. Okay. It means a lot to me cause
over here I have more of a chance to kinda choose
what I want to do with my life, who to be, and I get to see the world from like, different perspectives
cause you have all kinds of people here too, so. (applause) Thank you all. Thank you for having me.

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    tyra Jackson

    I really knew the first girl was Ethiopian and the fourth man was Cambodian. And I thought the pretty lady second to last was either Thai or Vietnamese.

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    Sabrina Valenzuela

    Ughhhhh. I couldnโ€™t imagine being as breathtakingly beautiful as Fatuma is. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿฝ Kudos to your parents for making such a perfect daughter. Sending lots of love, blessings, and light your way, baby girl.

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    Claire Schneider

    i love how sheโ€™s like โ€œIs tHaT a AcCeNt?โ€ while thereโ€™s a fist sized hickey in his neck๐Ÿฅด

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    Shane Etchison

    Asking a Cambodian why he was in a refugee camp… not sure if I should blame American or Kenyan schools. Probably both.

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    BuzzFeedRight

    5:28 the kid is lying in front of minority's because if his British citizenship did matter more he wouldn't be living in LA ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

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    Chapo Dallas

    I love the fact tht she has the same name as me but both of ours are spelled differently (phateema) I love it !!โค๏ธโค๏ธ

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    T. Cherie Frederick

    I'm Vietnamese and it's so funny bc people think I'm not from America. They're always shocked bc I don't have a Vietnamese accent and I speak perfect English, (I even have a country accent ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿคฃ). Since I've married my husband (he's African American) people definitely think we are a military couple and he got me from overseas. My husband and I actually met in middle school. But in reality, I was born and raised in Mississippi. A year before I was born, my parents came to America.

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    Emily & Mari plays

    Thatโ€™s guy that was an engineer was born where my mom was in Cambodia and went through the same war my mom did

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    50,000 subscribers w/o videos

    I forget other people donโ€™t do the grape thing for new years ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

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    Michael Tang

    Bruh, how do you value a U.K. citizenship over US? I know trump and everything but cmon the U.K. is literally going to implode from this Brexit stuff.

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    Anna BryJo

    Haha Calem is such a British name it's my cousins and his siblings are rory, isla, dougal and my other cousins are euen and Ellen and my sister is carys we have a weird British family

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    willie jones

    I'll marry the girl in the Middle with a blue and red striped dress and give her citizenship! Who's with me?

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    Keerti Venkat

    I loved watching this mainly because they talked about why their US citizenship is so important. As the child of immigrant parents I constantly am learning how I have a better life and way more opportunities simply because I'm a citizen, and what my parents went through to get their citizenship.

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    Abdulla AlTurabi

    Is no1 going to talk about that thai shemale tricking us into thinking she's a girl? Holy mother of god my mind is blown

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    Alejandra Marquez

    As soon as the girl in the denim jacket said the 12 grapes tradition was american I knew she was born in the US cuz girl that tradition is not american

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    Valerie

    The girl with the glasses and denim jacket was obviously a U.S. citizen because before she said โ€œ…I think Latin America.โ€ If she wasnโ€™t a citizen, she most likely wouldโ€™ve have been sure where.

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